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  • How many service stations are there in the United States?

    The National Petroleum News compiles that information every year and gave us permission to report it on our Website. The trade publication’s July 2011 issue reported there were 157,393 locations nationwide selling gasoline, including service stations, truck stops, convenience stores and marinas.
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  • Do the major oil companies own all the service stations in this country?

    No. According to the latest information, the major integrated oil companies own about 3% of the 157,393 retail stations and operate about a third of the retail stations that they do own. When a station bears a particular API member’s brand, it does not mean that the API member owns or operates the station. The vast majority of branded stations are owned and operated by independent retailers licensed to represent that brand. According to the National Association of Convenience Stores (NACS), more than half of the retail stations in the US are owned by an individual or family. Through various branding agreements, approximately 37% of the retail stations in the US sell fuel under API members’ brands. See U.S. Retail Service Station Outlets Table and Retail Service Station Outlets Ownership Pie Chart.
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  • Who owns the rest of the stations?

    Independent owners. They may own just one station, or they could own several stations, or they could own hundreds of stations.
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  • Can these independent owners also sell the major brands of gasoline?

    Yes. Independents and jobbers can sell gasoline under the brand of one major company or multiple major companies, as well as have their own brand of fuel.
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  • Why is the price of gasoline so much higher in other countries?

    Many countries assess higher tax rates and use the revenue for their general fund budget.  For example, four countries, the Netherlands, France, Italy and Belgium assess more than $3 in taxes on every gallon of gasoline.
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  • What’s the single best thing I can do to save gasoline?

    Combine trips. Plan well and be sensible about how much you drive. Conserve by avoiding unnecessary trips, combining errands, and carpooling.
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  • When I am behind the wheel, how can I get more miles per gallon?

    Accelerate smoothly. Jackrabbit starts consume twice the fuel as gradual starts. Also, pace your driving. Staying at a constant speed is better than continuously speeding up and slowing down. Slow down. The faster you drive, the more gasoline your car uses. Driving at 65 miles per hour instead of 55 miles per hour reduces fuel economy by about two miles per gallon.
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  • Besides changing driving habits, what can I do to improve vehicle fuel efficiency?

    Maintain your vehicle. Have your car tuned regularly and keep tires properly inflated. An engine tune-up can improve car fuel economy by an average of one mile per gallon; under-inflated tires can reduce it by that amount. Also, less use of your air conditioner can improve fuel economy by as much as two miles per gallon.
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  • Does it make a difference what car I drive?

    More fuel-efficient vehicles can save gasoline. A highly fuel-efficient vehicle could potentially cut gasoline use in half or more. How much depends on the vehicle and driving habits and needs. If a less fuel-efficient car requires 20 gallons of gasoline a week compared with 10 gallons for a highly fuel-efficient vehicle, more than 500 gallons of gasoline could be saved annually.
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  • What about ethanol?

    Ethanol, which is often blended in gasoline, contains less energy per gallon than gasoline. However, a 10-percent or less ethanol blend would have only a slight impact on fuel efficiency. According to U.S. Department of Energy and U.S. Environmental Protection Agency fuel economy guidelines, E-85 (85 percent ethanol/15 percent gasoline blend) may reduce fuel efficiency by 26 percent.
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