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Energy Tomorrow Blog

Price Spikes in New England Limited by Natural Gas – Just Not Ours

consumers  natural gas  liquefied natural gas  imports  marcellus  utica shale 

Jessica  Lutz

Jessica Lutz
Posted May 17, 2019

It seems like each winter we see consumers in New England suffering not just from freezing temperatures but also the highest energy prices in the country (see here and here) – largely because there’s not enough natural gas infrastructure to serve the region during periods of peak winter demand. This past winter, the news was a little bit better.

Natural gas prices generally follow seasonal patterns and tend to rise in the winter. For example, the U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) has suggested

that liquefied natural gas (LNG) imports  helped to moderate energy price spikes in the region this year. ...

Still, domestic infrastructure constraints in New York and New England mean that residents remain faced with relatively high and uncertain energy prices plus the possibility of winter shortages – not to mention the unnecessary stress those conditions put on the region’s power grid. 

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Tariffs Continue to Hurt U.S. Consumers, Not China

trade  china  consumers  taxes 

Jessica  Lutz

Jessica Lutz
Posted May 8, 2019

We can’t say it enough: U.S. consumers, not China, are paying the costs of the administration’s tariffs on Chinese goods – which the administration says will increase on Friday to 25 percent on $200 billion in goods, up from the current 10 percent.

As we’ve noted here, here and here, Americans are the ones hurt by tariffs, which essentially are a tax on consumer goods that millions of U.S. families use.

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Offshore Energy Revenues Boost State Conservation, Coastal Protection

conservation  offshore energy  revenues 

Jessica  Lutz

Jessica Lutz
Posted May 2, 2019

Offshore energy development has delivered yet another economic and conservation boost to states – this time to the tune of $215 million.

The U.S. Department of the Interior disbursed the funds last week to the four Gulf natural gas and oil producing states – Alabama, Louisiana, Mississippi and Texas, and their coastal political subdivisions – for use toward coastal conservation and hurricane protection projects. And the best part? Not a single dollar came from taxpayers.


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Natural Gas: The Global Fuel of Choice

natural gas  eia  iea  emission reductions  global energy demand 

Jessica  Lutz

Jessica Lutz
Posted March 26, 2019

Natural gas is playing a lead role in meeting rapidly increasing global energy demand, and its growing use in electricity generation has resulted in significant savings in carbon dioxide emissions worldwide. These points were echoed by the International Energy Agency (IEA) in its Global Energy and CO2 Status Report released this week.

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The Critical Importance of Energy Access in Alaska’s Coastal Plain

alaska leasing plan  access  economic benefits  jobs  security 

Jessica  Lutz

Jessica Lutz
Posted March 18, 2019

In light of last week’s comment deadline for the U.S. Bureau of Land Management (BLM) Draft Environmental Impact Statement (DEIS) for Alaska’s Coastal Plain Oil and Gas Leasing Program, it’s important to remember just how critical natural gas and oil development is to the Alaskan economy, the Alaskan people, and the long-term energy security of the United States.

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NOPEC a Detriment to U.S. Economic and Energy Interests

Jessica  Lutz

Jessica Lutz
Posted March 13, 2019

A recent analysis from the Baker Institute sheds light on the implications of H.R. 948, the No Oil Producing and Exporting Cartels (NOPEC) Act, that was recently reported by the House Committee on the Judiciary as well as related legislation, S. 370, that has been introduced in the Senate. The daunting takeaway: The Act’s extraterritorial overreach would harm core U.S. economic and energy interests.

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U.S. Consumers Bearing the Brunt of Tariffs and Quotas

taxes  trade  consumers  imports  infrastructure 

Jessica  Lutz

Jessica Lutz
Posted March 13, 2019

The administration is considering doubling down on its trade war despite repeated warnings and thorough evidence that tariffs and quotas are negatively impacting American consumers, even while failing to lower the U.S. trade deficit. We can now add one more report to that long list of evidence with the release of a new analysis from the National Bureau of Economic Research (NBER) with all-too-familiar findings: the economic impact of trade restrictions is falling solely on consumers – not the countries that they target – despite the Administration’s claims. This serves as an unfortunate reminder that tariffs are a tax on imported goods that is paid for not only by American businesses but potentially consumers.

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Study Finds Negative Impacts of EPA’s Proposed RIN Reform

rfs34  renewable fuel standard  biofuels  fuel 

Jessica  Lutz

Jessica Lutz
Posted February 27, 2019

EPA’s proposal to reform a key component of the Renewable Fuel Standard (RFS) would only worsen the already broken RFS, a new study finds. ­The analysis by Covington & Burling for API affirms that the administration’s proposal to reform the market for Renewable Identification Numbers (RINs) under the RFS misdiagnoses the problem with the RINs market and provides misguided and counterproductive changes.

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New Modeling Shows Impacts of Trade Policy Gone Awry

policy  trade  oil and natural gas 

Jessica  Lutz

Jessica Lutz
Posted February 20, 2019

Earlier this month we talked about the unforced error of the administration’s tariff and quota policies that hamstring the economy, detailing the findings of recent report from the nonpartisan Congressional Budget Office. Now, new modeling has reviewed those suspicions in the context of the energy trade, and the indications are clear: The escalating trade wars could significantly limit the U.S. energy revolution and the benefits to Americans that it would otherwise bring.

The recent report, part of BP’s annual “Outlook,” a macro-look at the global energy system over the next 30 years, models a number of different scenarios including one in which global trade disputes persist and worsen. The results of this “less globalization” scenario indicate that the continuation of these policies would slow global GDP growth by 6 percent and energy demand growth by 4 percent in 2040. To make matters worse, the effect could be intensified in countries and regions most exposed to foreign trade – like the U.S.

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API is On the Move to Its New D.C. Home

Jessica  Lutz

Jessica Lutz
Posted February 14, 2019

A lot has been done since we first announced plans to move API’s headquarters in Washington, D.C., and thanks to the work of highly skilled craft tradesmen and women those plans have officially become a reality. In step with the innovation and advanced technologies that have led the U.S. natural gas and oil industry to meet record world energy demand while driving record CO2 emissions reductions, the industry’s leading national trade association has a new, self-sustaining LEED Platinum-certified building to call home.

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