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Energy Tomorrow Blog

Happy Birthday, America!

american energy  us energy security  economic growth 

Jessica  Lutz

Jessica Lutz
Posted July 3, 2019

This July 4th, as a record-breaking 41 million Americans hit the roads to celebrate our nation’s independence, let’s take a moment to remember that the energy we use isn’t just the gasoline that gets us to the barbeque.

Here are just a few fun facts about the energy that goes into America’s Independence Day.


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The U.S. as Global Oil Growth Supplier

global energy demand  crude oil supplies  iea  us energy security 

Jessica  Lutz

Jessica Lutz
Posted June 19, 2019

Another big indication of the global impact of the U.S. energy revolution comes in the International Energy Agency’s (IEA) oil market report and its outlook for 2020, which says the United States will be responsible for virtually all of this year’s increase in oil supply. …

The fact that the U.S. is projected to fill this role is significant in terms of global market stability and the world’s security – that is, the United States as this growth supplier, versus less stable and/or less friendly regimes.  


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GAO Report – Another Reason to Sunset the RFS

ethanol  renewable fuel standard  consumers  gasoline prices  emission reductions 

Jessica  Lutz

Jessica Lutz
Posted June 11, 2019

We’ve warned before (see here, here and here) that the broken Renewable Fuel Standard (RFS) and its mandates for ever-increasing ethanol use put consumers at risk. And that the administration’s recent decision to allow summer sales of E15 fuel – a blend containing 50 percent more ethanol than the E10 gasoline that’s widespread across the country – is an ineffective approach to addressing concerns with the RFS that will only serve to make things worse. Now, we can add another report to the long list of evidence that the RFS needs to be sunset – this time coming from the non-partisan U.S. Government Accountability Office (GAO).

The GAO recently reviewed the effects of the RFS and found that requiring the use of corn-based ethanol and biodiesel in gasoline supplies hasn’t lowered pump prices or significantly reduced greenhouse gas emissions – two of the main goals of the flawed RFS program. In fact, the review finds that gas prices outside of the corn-rich Midwest likely increased because of the program. To make matters worse, the review also found that there has been little, if any, reduction in greenhouse gas emissions – a main selling point used by proponents to justify the program. 

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Celebrating National Ocean Month

offshore platforms  offshore energy  rigs 

Jessica  Lutz

Jessica Lutz
Posted June 6, 2019

Following past White House precedent, President Trump recently designated June 2019 as National Ocean Month in recognition of the ocean’s role in supporting the U.S. economy, national security and environment, while recommitting to safeguard its vital resources.

The U.S. offshore energy industry wholeheartedly supports the sentiments in the president’s proclamation and demonstrates this day in and day out.


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Administration Ignores Risk to Consumers, Pushes More E15 into Fuel Supply

renewable fuel standard  consumers  ethanol  vehicle 

Jessica  Lutz

Jessica Lutz
Posted June 3, 2019

The administration’s decision to allow summer sales of E15 fuel – a blend containing 50 percent more ethanol than the E10 gasoline that’s widespread across the country – is a disappointing and ineffective approach to addressing concerns with the broken Renewable Fuel Standard (RFS).

EPA’s rulemaking that extends the RVP waiver, effectively lifting a ban on summertime E15 sales, only worsens risks for U.S. consumers – given repeated warnings that pushing more E15 into the fuel supply could harm the vast majority of vehicles on the road that aren’t designed to use it, as well as engines in motorcycles, boats and lawn equipment for which E15 is incompatible. All to help farmers struggling under the weight of the administration’s own harmful trade tariffs.

It may seem obvious, but apparently it needs stating: EPA should be most concerned about the interests of U.S. consumers as it forms policy, not cleaning up messes caused by the administration’s flawed trade policy.

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Price Spikes in New England Limited by Natural Gas – Just Not Ours

consumers  natural gas  liquefied natural gas  imports  marcellus  utica shale 

Jessica  Lutz

Jessica Lutz
Posted May 17, 2019

It seems like each winter we see consumers in New England suffering not just from freezing temperatures but also the highest energy prices in the country (see here and here) – largely because there’s not enough natural gas infrastructure to serve the region during periods of peak winter demand. This past winter, the news was a little bit better.

Natural gas prices generally follow seasonal patterns and tend to rise in the winter. For example, the U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) has suggested

that liquefied natural gas (LNG) imports  helped to moderate energy price spikes in the region this year. ...

Still, domestic infrastructure constraints in New York and New England mean that residents remain faced with relatively high and uncertain energy prices plus the possibility of winter shortages – not to mention the unnecessary stress those conditions put on the region’s power grid. 

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Tariffs Continue to Hurt U.S. Consumers, Not China

trade  china  consumers  taxes 

Jessica  Lutz

Jessica Lutz
Posted May 8, 2019

We can’t say it enough: U.S. consumers, not China, are paying the costs of the administration’s tariffs on Chinese goods – which the administration says will increase on Friday to 25 percent on $200 billion in goods, up from the current 10 percent.

As we’ve noted here, here and here, Americans are the ones hurt by tariffs, which essentially are a tax on consumer goods that millions of U.S. families use.

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Offshore Energy Revenues Boost State Conservation, Coastal Protection

conservation  offshore energy  revenues 

Jessica  Lutz

Jessica Lutz
Posted May 2, 2019

Offshore energy development has delivered yet another economic and conservation boost to states – this time to the tune of $215 million.

The U.S. Department of the Interior disbursed the funds last week to the four Gulf natural gas and oil producing states – Alabama, Louisiana, Mississippi and Texas, and their coastal political subdivisions – for use toward coastal conservation and hurricane protection projects. And the best part? Not a single dollar came from taxpayers.


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Natural Gas: The Global Fuel of Choice

natural gas  eia  iea  emission reductions  global energy demand 

Jessica  Lutz

Jessica Lutz
Posted March 26, 2019

Natural gas is playing a lead role in meeting rapidly increasing global energy demand, and its growing use in electricity generation has resulted in significant savings in carbon dioxide emissions worldwide. These points were echoed by the International Energy Agency (IEA) in its Global Energy and CO2 Status Report released this week.

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The Critical Importance of Energy Access in Alaska’s Coastal Plain

alaska leasing plan  access  economic benefits  jobs  security 

Jessica  Lutz

Jessica Lutz
Posted March 18, 2019

In light of last week’s comment deadline for the U.S. Bureau of Land Management (BLM) Draft Environmental Impact Statement (DEIS) for Alaska’s Coastal Plain Oil and Gas Leasing Program, it’s important to remember just how critical natural gas and oil development is to the Alaskan economy, the Alaskan people, and the long-term energy security of the United States.

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