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Energy Tomorrow Blog

Here’s How to Devastate U.S. Energy and the World Economy: Ban Fracking

hydraulic fracturing  fracking  democrats  consumers  economic growth 

Mark Green

Mark Green
Posted November 14, 2019

Calls for a ban on hydraulic fracturing by some of the Democratic presidential candidates continue to make for discussion on the campaign trail – and boy, that is a discussion everyone should be paying attention to. The stakes are sky-high.

Recently, we highlighted this Michael Lynch analysis warning that a fracking ban could devastate the U.S. economy. Now the Manhattan Institute’s Mark P. Mills has a piece on Real Clear Energy asserting that in the most serious scenarios, banning U.S. fracking could put the global economy in recession – entirely plausible, given that the United States is the leading producer of natural gas and oil, the two energy sources that supply 54% of the globe’s fuel. In all, Mills notes in this report, fossil fuels supply 84% of the world’s energy.

Those are the stakes when candidates kick around the notion of banning hydraulic fracturing, which is used for 95% of new U.S. wells today. Ban fracking and you pull the rug out from under U.S. production – and with it, energy security, global energy leadership and, yes, environmental progress – considering increased U.S. use of natural gas has lowered energy-related carbon dioxide emissions to their lowest levels in a generation.

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Senate Bipartisan Climate Caucus a Promising Addition to U.S. Conversation

senate  climate  emission reductions 

Mark Green

Mark Green
Posted November 13, 2019

Our industry is committed to creating climate solutions now and for the future. As energy producers, natural gas and oil companies are essential to a credible, national climate conversation – since this often is focused on energy production and use.

It’s also real and practical. We’re innovating new technologies and procedures for real-world results – to continue reducing emissions while also supplying the natural gas and oil our nation needs to be growing, prosperous and secure.

That’s why initiatives such as the U.S. Senate’s new bipartisan climate caucus are needed to help spur a solutions-centered discussion at the highest levels in Washington, so we can pragmatically and effectively see progress – both on climate and our country’s fundamental energy needs. 

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Natural Gas Exports Ban Makes Little Sense for Environment

natural gas  lng exports  carbon dioxide emissions  climate 

Mark Green

Mark Green
Posted November 1, 2019

The U.S. as a global leader in natural gas exports is underlined by a new government report showing that through the first six months of this year, U.S. net natural gas exports averaged 4.1 billion cubic feet per day (Bcf/d) – more than doubling 2018’s average net exports. This follows analysis that the U.S. became a net exporter of natural gas on an annual basis for the first time in 60 years in 2017.

These figures are significant for a number of reasons:

First, they attest to the strength of domestic natural gas production, which continues to set records – largely thanks to shale production enabled by safe hydraulic fracturing. … Second, expanding markets for U.S. natural gas helps support more domestic production – which means jobs, investments and other economic growth.

Third, growing exports of clean natural gas means other nations may realize the environmental benefits from increased use of natural gas.

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Natural Gas, Oil and Reinvestment in America

royalties  revenues  oil and natural gas production  interior department 

Mark Green

Mark Green
Posted October 28, 2019

America’s natural gas and oil industry continues to work for Americans – with revenues from production on federal and Native American-owned lands  and offshore areas driving $11.69 billion in federal disbursements back to the states, counties, tribes and reclamation and conservation programs. That’s $2.76 billion more than the previous fiscal year and nearly double the disbursements in FY2016, the Interior Department said.

Recipients included: $2.44 billion to states and counties, $1.76 billion to the reclamation fund, $1.14 billion to Native American tribes and individual mineral owners, $1 billion to the Land and Water Conservation Fund and $4.9 billion to the U.S. treasury.

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Here’s How to Devastate U.S. Energy, Economy: Ban Fracking

hydraulic fracturing  fracking  economic impacts  natural gas 

Mark Green

Mark Green
Posted October 25, 2019

Energy analyst Michael Lynch has a couple of charts in his recent article for Forbes that do a good job of showing the stark repercussions of banning hydraulic fracturing – as a number of Democrats have advocated on the campaign trail.

First, understand that modern, technologically advanced fracking is used for 95% of new wells today. Shale and tight sandstone formations, which need hydraulic fracturing to be economically feasible, accounted for about 69% of total U.S. dry natural gas production in 2018 and 59% of total U.S. crude oil production, according to the U.S. Energy Information Administration. So, yes, a fracking ban or something approaching it would put a major dent in U.S. production.


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Offshore Energy’s Fair Share

offshore development  royalty payments  gulf of mexico 

Mark Green

Mark Green
Posted October 24, 2019

As the New York Times launches another attack on congressionally mandated support for U.S. offshore development in the Gulf of Mexico, some facts are in order:

The Deep Water Royalty Relief Act enacted by Congress in 1995 was designed to help spur deep water offshore production as the U.S. faced increasing dependence on imported oil – and the courts found that its intent is clear. Background on the act here and here.

The false claim that there is a royalty relief “loophole,” asserted by the Times and others, omits the fact that between 2000 and 2018 natural gas and oil companies paid more than $122 billion to the government in high bids, royalties and rents. Add to that tens of billions the industry spent to develop those leases, creating jobs and boosting local and regional economies – an integral part of industry’s $1.3 trillion overall support for the U.S. economy.

Today, U.S. Gulf production is setting records, averaging 1.8 million barrels per day (b/d) in 2018 and expected by the government to reach 1.9 million b/d this year and 2 million b/d in 2020. This production generates millions in revenue-sharing dollars for coastal states, as well as the Land and Water Conservation Fund, which supports state conservation and outdoor recreation projects all across the country.


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For Public Health, Safe Operations in Colorado – And Everywhere

colorado  safe operations  industry standards  regulation  emission reductions 

Mark Green

Mark Green
Posted October 18, 2019

There’s nothing more important to our industry than protecting health and safety – of our skilled workers and the communities where they are engaged in supplying Americans with affordable energy for every aspect of modern life and economic well-being.

As energy companies, we know that maintaining the public’s trust and the permission to operate hinge on our ability to work safely and responsibly – caring for the environment, reducing our footprint and continually improving technologies and operations to reduce emissions.

This is the context as we consider a new report on the potential public health effects of natural gas and oil operations by the Colorado Department of Public Health and Environment (CDPHE), using 2015 data to model impacts.

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But What About New Mexico’s Students?

new mexico  education  oil and natural gas taxes  revenues 

Mark Green

Mark Green
Posted October 16, 2019

Hydraulic fracturing – the technological breakthrough that launched the U.S. energy revolution – has taken a beating during the Democratic presidential derby.

The Washington Post ran a graphic recently, showing that the entire field would ban fracking altogether or restrict it in some capacity. Here’s the portion of the graphic showing the candidates who would ban fracking completely. The group includes some top-tier candidates, U.S. Sens. Elizabeth Warren, Bernie Sanders and Kamala Harris. Sen. Warren tweeted last month that she would ban fracking everywhere, while Sen. Sanders told the Post that safe fracking is a “pure fiction.”

Not fiction are the negative impacts throughout our society that could result from banning hydraulic fracturing: millions of job losses, trillions lost to the economy, significant increases in household spending on energy.

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The Continuing Quest for Energy – and Lower Emissions

natural gas  emission reductions  climate  the-environmental-partnership 

Mark Green

Mark Green
Posted October 14, 2019

Looking over EPA’s new Greenhouse Gas Reporting Program (GHGRP) data on methane emissions, let’s consider two overarching points:

First, energy from natural gas and oil power and empower America’s modern way of life – better health, greater comforts and conveniences and opportunities for Americans and their families to prosper. No other energy comes close in terms of accessibility, reliability, affordability and useful adaptability across an economy and nation as large and diverse as ours.

Second, as America’s natural gas and oil industry produces the energy we count on every day, it also must continue to capture as much methane as possible from that production, to help the U.S. meet its climate objectives. On both of those leading priorities, our industry is on it.

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Producing Energy, Reducing Emissions in New Mexico

new mexico  emission reductions  production  methane 

Mark Green

Mark Green
Posted October 8, 2019

Take a look at a recent interview with API President and CEO Mike Sommers conducted by Albuquerque TV station KOB-4 – a conversation about the dual challenge of providing the energy Americans need every day to work, grow and prosper, while protecting the environment and lowering emissions. There’s no better setting for this discussion than in energy-rich New Mexico.

Indeed, the prolific Permian Basin that covers New Mexico’s southeastern corner before spreading into neighboring Texas is a big reason why the United States continues to lead the world in natural gas and oil production.


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