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Energy Tomorrow Blog

Offshore Energy: 10 Key Ways Operations Have Been Strengthened

safe operations  safety standards  offshore drilling safety  bsee  regulations 

Erik Milito

Erik Milito
Posted April 17, 2019

With the Trump administration nearing release of a new five-year offshore leasing plan for oil and natural gas, offshore energy has never been safer or stronger – thanks to initiatives and technologies designed to enhance worker safety and protect the environment. (See this post dispelling offshore energy myths.) Below, 10 important developments that have strengthened the vitally important work of harnessing America’s offshore energy.

1. Center for Offshore Safety

The Center for Offshore Safety (COS) is an industry-led initiative to promote continuous safety improvement for offshore drilling, completions and operations through effective leadership, communication, teamwork, disciplined management systems and independent third-party auditing and certification. 

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Industry's Focus on Cutting Methane Emissions

emission reductions  methane  oil and natural gas  epa  the-environmental-partnership 

Erik Milito

Erik Milito
Posted March 18, 2019

The oil and natural gas industry is laser-focused on reducing methane emissions from production for two very important reasons.

First, the risks of climate change are real, requiring real solutions. Our industry takes these risks seriously, and we are driving solutions – evident in our innovation and technical work and in our long working relationship with the EPA.

Second, our members are in the business of providing natural gas, of which methane is the chief component, for clean electricity generation, to heat Americans’ homes and to supply manufacturers and other businesses that have realized billions in cost savings as a result. There’s no question that industry is highly motivated to capture as much methane as possible for progress on climate goals and for its customers. The results speak for themselves.

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Innovation, Science, and Fracking

hydraulic fracturing  ghg emission reduction  regulations  drinking water  energy production  horizontal drilling  carbon emissions 

Erik Milito

Erik Milito
Posted June 9, 2016

Competitive forces and industry innovation continue to drive technological advances and produce clean-burning natural gas, which has led to reducing carbon emissions from power generation to their lowest level in more than 20 years, making it clear that environmental progress and energy production are not mutually exclusive.

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Natural Gas and CO2 Emissions

air quality  co2 emissions  natural gas 

Erik Milito

Erik Milito
Posted July 17, 2015

Earlier this week Climate Central posted a story on carbon dioxide emissions from power plants noting that 41 states experienced reductions from 2008 to 2013, according to a study by Ceres, the Natural Resources Defense Council, Bank of America and four large utilities. 

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Nothing Modest About the Shale Revolution

hydraulic fracturing  fracking  american energy  Economy  revenue 

Erik Milito

Erik Milito
Posted October 22, 2013

Working in Washington D.C. big numbers (trillions and trillions) are thrown around casually, which can sometimes distort what these numbers actually mean in the real world.  An example from yesterday’s Washington Post:

The shale-gas boom will provide a modest boost to the U.S. economy. On average, the models in the Stanford study predicted that the natural-gas boom would raise GDP by about $70 billion per year over the next several decades (in current dollars).

$70 billion a year!  While, as the article notes, it is not an overwhelming percentage of GDP, ours is a big economy and $70 billion a year is nothing to be modest about.  There is a great breadth of industries contributing to our great economy so for comparison let’s pick one, and since I’m a big movie fan, let’s look at motion pictures. 

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Better Data for Better Decisions on LNG

department of energy  development  employment  lng exports  natural gas supply 

Erik Milito

Erik Milito
Posted March 15, 2013

Opponents of a free market for natural gas have been trumpetinga new study which purports to show that LNG exports would be an economic negative for the United States. This flies in the face of analysis done by the Department of EnergyThe Brookings InstituteICF International and others which showed that to boost economic activity open markets are the way to go. So we took a look at the study to figure out why their conclusions are not consistent with other industry or government projections. We found some serious biases and inconsistent assumptions added up to a fatally flawed report. Here are a few specifics.

The employment impact analysis is flawed because it assumes no incremental natural gas production.

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