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Energy Tomorrow Blog

Infrastructure: Catalyst for Progress, More Equitable Access to Energy

infrastructure  pipelines  access  consumers 

Mark Green

Mark Green
Posted September 25, 2020

A call for environmental justice (EJ) is featured in U.S. House climate legislation being debated in Congress. While the EJ section of House Democrats’ climate plan focuses on environmental goals, one part calls for an energy justice and democracy program at the U.S. Energy Department to reduce energy poverty and to ensure communities have equitable access to energy efficiency and renewable energy.

Building or expanding America’s natural gas pipeline network is key to reducing energy poverty in the U.S. – seeing that Americans, no matter where they live, can get affordable natural gas for home heating, cooking and other uses. Thanks to abundant, affordable natural gas, U.S. power sector emissions of carbon dioxide are at their lowest levels in a generation. Increasing infrastructure capacity, increasing natural gas use, supports this beneficial trend.

Unfortunately, this kind of energy fairness isn’t a reality everywhere in the U.S. Some Americans have no choice but to use wood-burning fireplaces or stoves to heat their homes, due to the lack of safe, reliable pipelines and other infrastructure to get energy where consumers want and need it.   

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Driving the Wrong Direction in California

california  electric vehicles  policy  consumers 

Mark Green

Mark Green
Posted September 24, 2020

Four observations about California Gov. Gavin Newsom’s executive order requiring that by 2035 all new cars sold in the state must be zero-emission vehicles – as well as his push for halting fracking in the state:

1. The governor's executive order could seriously impact middle-class Californians.

2. Seriously, a zero-emissions mandate in a state that has struggled to keep the lights on?

3. There's rhetoric and there's reality.

4. State natural gas and oil production is being targeted.


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Federal Leasing Ban Pledge Hits a Nerve in New Mexico

new mexico  federal lands  federal leases  economic impacts  jobs 

Mark Green

Mark Green
Posted September 16, 2020

As former Vice President Joe Biden continues to clarify his position on fracking – saying he’d allow it with some environmental safeguards – what he’s not talking about is huge: His and the Democratic Party’s pledge to effectively end new natural gas and oil production on federal lands and waters.

In this post we discussed the national impacts of such a policy, detailed in a new analysis, including weakened U.S. security, lost jobs and reduced economic output.

Few states are projected to be hit harder than New Mexico, where more than 30% of the land is controlled by the federal government and accounts for half of the state’s oil production. As of May, New Mexico was producing 885,000 barrels per day, ranking it second in the nation. So, yes, Biden’s promised ban is making folks in New Mexico a little nervous.


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The Administration’s Misstep on Eastern Gulf, South Atlantic Offshore Policy

offshore access  eastern gulf of mexico  atlantic ocs  us energy security 

Mark Green

Mark Green
Posted September 14, 2020

A national policy that puts U.S. energy off-limits to development would have serious negative impacts for our nation’s security, jobs, the economy and household budgets. As argued in this post, proponents of policies that ban new natural gas and oil development on federal lands and waters have a lot of explaining to do.

This includes former Vice President Joe Biden and the Democratic Party Platform, which both pledge to effectively end new federal natural gas and oil development.

Unfortunately, it also includes the White House, which announced this week that there will be no offshore oil and natural gas development in the Eastern Gulf of Mexico and South Atlantic going forward, into the year 2032.

This is wrong for U.S. energy, wrong for American security, wrong for jobs and wrong for economic growth. 

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Ban on New Federal Development Would Risk U.S. Security, Jobs, Environment

federal lands  offshore oil production  policy  jobs  emission reductions 

Mark Green

Mark Green
Posted September 9, 2020

Four questions for proponents of policies that would effectively end new natural gas and oil development on federal lands and waters:

Where will the oil come from that won’t be produced here at home because of such a policy?

Where will nearly 1 million Americans find new work after this policy costs them their jobs?

What will Americans do without because of higher energy costs resulting from the policy?

How will the U.S. continue making environmental progress if increased coal use caused by the policy raises carbon dioxide emissions?

These and other questions are prompted by a new analysis projecting the effects of halting new natural gas and oil on federal lands and waters -- prepared for API by OnLocation with the U.S. Energy Information Administration's National Energy Modeling System, which EIA uses to produce its Annual Energy Outlook.


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Biden’s Pledge to Pennsylvania Energy Workers Not All It’s Cracked Up to Be

pennsylvania  federal lands  president  politics  fracking 

Mark Green

Mark Green
Posted September 3, 2020

Former Vice President Joe Biden hit the campaign trail this week in southwestern Pennsylvania, home to the energy-rich Marcellus Shale – a good backdrop for discussing how Biden’s energy and jobs policies could affect Pennsylvania and other big production states, including New Mexico and Colorado, as well as Gulf Coast states.

Start with Biden’s remarks from Pittsburgh that, if elected, he will not ban fracking – clearly, to calm voters in shale country, where hydraulic fracturing has revitalized state and local economies, and necessitated by what he said in March and July, which sounded an awful lot like he would ban fracking.

So, case closed, right? Well, not exactly.


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Jobs, Tax Revenues Could Be Lost if Dakota Access Pipeline is Shut Down – Study

pipelines  jobs  tax revenues  north dakota  montana 

Mark Green

Mark Green
Posted September 2, 2020

While the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers completes a new environmental report on the Dakota Access pipeline (DAPL) in North Dakota, there’s new research showing that shuttering the pipeline would cut oil production from the prolific Bakken shale region, kill thousands of jobs and cost state and local governments millions in tax revenues generated by energy production.

The environmental effects of Dakota Access’ crossing under Lake Oahe are being studied anew after the corps was ordered to do so by a federal court. The review is expected to take 13 months. Although legal challenges surrounding DAPL are pending, an appeals court overturned the lower court’s order to halt operations and empty the pipeline while the environmental review is ongoing.

While we all wait for the review, an ICF analysis commissioned by API shows what halting Dakota Access operations would mean to production and economies. 

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Energy and Our Security

us energy security  oil and natural gas production  global markets  hurricanes 

Mark Green

Mark Green
Posted August 28, 2020

Americans’ safety and security are critically linked to energy.

Whether it’s energy to power a growing economy or energy that keeps America free and strong in the world – and even reliable energy in the wake of a Category 4 hurricane – abundant domestic natural gas and oil are essential for our security. ...

Abundant and reliable natural gas and oil from America make the country safer and more secure in a number of ways.

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Video: No Malarkey, Natural Gas and Oil Critical to U.S. Security, Growth

us energy security  economic growth  manufacturing  president 

Mark Green

Mark Green
Posted August 25, 2020

Former Vice President Joe Biden, talking about the benefits of U.S. natural gas and oil in the years leading up to his 2020 presidential campaign:

“North American energy makes us independent.”

“We now have over a hundred years’ supply of natural gas that would enable us to meet every single need we have in America.”

“We’re positioned to own the 21st century. … North America will remain the epicenter of energy.”

… Clearly, there was a time when the former vice president was quite bullish on U.S. natural gas and oil. He recognized the strategic benefit of falling U.S. oil imports and the advantages of affordable, reliable energy to American manufacturing. … Unfortunately, things have changed.


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California Blackouts Help Make the Case for Natural Gas

natural gas  renewable energy  california  electricity 

Mark Green

Mark Green
Posted August 20, 2020

Natural gas as the essential partner for renewables such as wind and solar is something we’ve talked about a lot (see here, here and here). Californians have been schooled on this point recently, with millions suffering under rolling blackouts during soaring temperatures because electrical utilities couldn’t keep pace with skyrocketing demand.

The state’s renewables mandate has played a role in their misery. By requiring that 60% of California’s electricity must come from renewables by 2030 and through green energy subsidies, the state has seen the competitive balance tilt away from other, more flexible power sources, including cleaner natural gas.

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