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Energy Tomorrow Blog

Affordable Natural Gas and Bettering Low-Income Americans’ Lives

natural gas  heat  consumers  energy costs  affordable energy 

Mark Green

Mark Green
Posted May 29, 2019

The headline of the opinion piece in the Orange County Register caught my eye – and should get the attention of everyone in this country:

“Fracking saves low-income Americans’ lives”

The article is based on research published earlier this year, which calculated that lower heating costs associated with surging domestic natural gas production averted 11,000 winter deaths in the U.S. each winter from 2005 to 2010.

Read on for details, but this research makes the critically important connection between abundant energy and Americans’ well-being.


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The Pro-Consumer U.S. Energy Revolution

consumers  energy costs  oil and natural gas production 

Mark Green

Mark Green
Posted April 9, 2019

America’s energy revolution is decidedly pro-consumer. Indeed, surging U.S. natural gas and oil production has significantly helped individual Americans and their families with their budgets, plan travel and more.

We’ll go mostly visual to absorb this – in a handful of charts from API’s Quarterly Industry Outlook, prepared by Chief Economist Dean Foreman. …

America’s natural gas and oil resurgence has played a major role in that when you think about the average family’s needs for driving, home heating and keeping the lights on (remembering that natural gas is the leading U.S. fuel for power generation). It follows, then, that families spending less on energy had more of their disposable income available for other needs.


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Explaining Natural Gas Price Fluctuations

consumers  natural gas  energy costs  prices 

Dean Foreman

Dean Foreman
Posted November 21, 2018

Recent headlines on natural gas prices may leave Americans feeling whipsawed by marketplace fluctuations (see here and here). So, let’s look at what’s been going on with natural gas this year. But first, four points to keep in mind:

Affordable natural gas has saved the average household more than $100 per year in recent years; (2) most consumers are typically insulated from wholesale price variations – the focus of recent news coverage; (3) price increases this month to date are mainly the result of lower inventories coupled with cold weather forecasts that, of course, can change suddenly; and (4) recent price movements in natural gas futures are well within the ranges seen during the resurgence in U.S. energy production

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Natural Gas Keeps Delivering for U.S. Consumers

consumers  natural gas  energy costs  emission reductions 

Mark Green

Mark Green
Posted January 17, 2017

These reports are significant in a couple of ways. Lower natural gas prices obviously benefit consumers, and they also benefit when costs are lower for the leading fuel for electricity generation. In addition, our air is cleaner because cleaner-burning natural gas has reduced carbon emissions from the power sector to 25-year lows. Future U.S. energy policy should recognize these natural gas benefits and others – including lower costs for manufacturers and export opportunities – by fostering more domestic natural gas production.

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Energy Year in Review

consumers  gasoline prices  energy costs  emission reductions  energy exports  access  infrastructure 

Jack Gerard

Jack Gerard
Posted December 28, 2016

Despite occasional policy obstacles, the U.S. energy revolution continues to enhance America’s economic and national security and deliver major benefits to consumers, the environment and manufacturers. With commonsense, market-based, consumer-focused energy policies, the new Congress and incoming administration can maintain and extend our global energy leadership.

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Winter and the Northeast’s Infrastructure Needs

consumers  energy costs  infrastructure  natural gas pipelines 

Michael Tadeo

Michael Tadeo
Posted October 28, 2016

Earlier this month the U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) issued its winter fuels outlook in which it said most U.S. households can expect higher heating costs this winter. In a conference call with reporters, API Chief Economist Erica Bowman discussed the approaching winter and underscored the need for increased natural pipeline capacity in the Northeast to help consumers there who historically have paid higher prices for energy than other parts of the country. 

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Beware of Tax Hikes That Could Impact Energy Renaissance

vote4energy  taxes  intangible drilling costs  oil and natural gas 

Mark Green

Mark Green
Posted August 19, 2016

The successful U.S. energy paradigm shouldn’t be put at risk by imposing higher taxes on the energy producers. Americans agree. In a recent poll 66 percent of registered voters said they oppose higher taxes that could decrease energy production. In a year where everyone is poll-conscious, it’s an opinion that should be heard.

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Just Say ‘Yes’ on Natural Gas, Infrastructure

natural gas  pipelines  climate  infrastructure  costs 

Mark Green

Mark Green
Posted July 1, 2016

When you see the significant economic, consumer and climate benefits to the U.S. from increased  use of natural gas, it’s quite a puzzle when some won’t take “yes” for an answer – yes to lower energy costs, yes to infrastructure jobs, yes to carbon emissions reductions. Unfortunately for Massachusetts residents, that’s the path the state legislature appears to be taking. More below. First, a review of how clean-burning natural gas is making life better across the rest of the country.

Let’s start with reduced household energy costs, which are helping to lower Americans’ cost of living, according to the U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA). In constant 2015 dollars, EIA says average annual energy costs per household peaked at about $5,300 in 2008 then declined 14.1 percent in 2014.

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Energizing Iowa

analysis  iowa  biofuels  e15  epa  ethanol  gasoline costs  renewable fuel standard  pricewaterhousecoopers  wood mackenzie 

Reid Porter

Reid Porter
Posted August 11, 2015

Our series highlighting the economic and jobs impact of energy in each of the 50 states continues today with Iowa. We started the series with Virginia on June 29 and reviewed Montana to begin this week. All information covered in this series can be found online here, arranged on an interactive map of the United States. State-specific information across the country will be populated on this map as the series continues.

As we can see with Iowa, the energy impacts of the states individually combine to form energy’s national economic and jobs picture: 9.8 million jobs supported and $1.2 trillion in value added.

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The Iran Irony

analysis  energy exports  crude oil  economic growth  gasoline costs  american petroleum institute  Jack Gerard 

Mark Green

Mark Green
Posted July 29, 2015

The current crude oil export debate basically is about global competition – and whether the United States will stop sanctioning itself and let an American commodity trade freely on the global market.

An irony – we’ll call it the “Iran Irony” – underscores the anti-competitive nature of our outdated ban on oil exports and the strategic shortsightedness of maintaining it.

The “Iran Irony” is this: While the U.S. advances a nuclear deal that would let Iran reemerge as a major oil supplier on the global market – to Iran’s economic and competitive gain – the United States denies itself similar benefits by banning its own crude exports. This is hurting America’s global competitiveness, diminishing the potential positive impacts of America’s rise as an energy superpower.

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