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Energy Tomorrow Blog

U.S. Energy Exports and Geopolitical Transformation

us energy security  crude oil exports  lng exports  state department 

Mark Green

Mark Green
Posted March 21, 2019

Earlier this year we noted federal projections that U.S. liquefied natural gas export capacity would reach almost 9 billion cubic feet per day (Bcf/d) in 2019, with exports averaging 5.1 Bcf/d. Add to that crude oil and other liquids, and the U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) projects that the U.S. will export more energy than it imports by 2020 – for the first time since the 1950s.

The numbers take on even more significance as the context for U.S. energy leadership around the world. At the CERAWeek conference earlier this month, U.S. Secretary of State Mike Pompeo talked about the unique opportunity for U.S. energy to transform geopolitical realities and in the process make Americans safer.

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Unintended Consequences in Alberta's Limits on Crude Output

alberta canada  crude oil  refiners  trade  production 

Dean Foreman

Dean Foreman
Posted February 19, 2019

A profound shift has taken place in North American oil markets over the past few months that’s now affecting trade between the United States and its biggest crude oil supplier, Canada.  

It involves supplies of heavier crude oil – important for the manufacture of a multitude of everyday products consumers use, from local road surfaces to the roofing for their houses. While the U.S. is producing domestic crude at record levels, there’s still a need for heavier crudes.

With heavy oil from Venezuela declining for years, the importance of close ties with Canada and especially the oil-producing province Alberta has increased. Unfortunately, Alberta’s decision to limit oil production appears to be advancing uneconomic outcomes, where some U.S. refiners signaled they’ll shift away from Canadian heavy crude oil and seek supply elsewhere. 


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Correlation Grows Between Financial Markets, Oil Prices

crude markets  crude oil prices  consumers  investments  finance 

Dean Foreman

Dean Foreman
Posted November 15, 2018

Earlier this year we pointed out that a roller coaster of emerging economic factors could affect oil markets and, ultimately, consumers – and we were correct.

Rising interest rates, trade and tariff disputes, near decade-high U.S. dollar appreciation and potential financial market uncertainties have become pronounced over the past few months, affecting global crude oil markets and producing the strongest correlation between financial markets and oil prices in years

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U.S. Energy Production Up, Emissions Down

crude oil  production  us energy security  emission reductions  epa ghg regulations 

Mark Green

Mark Green
Posted October 23, 2018

Two stat lines capture the essence of modern natural gas and oil development:

First, the United States produced a record 11 million barrels of oil per day (mbd) in September, 2.2 mbd more than September 2017, according to API’s latest Monthly Statistical Report (MSR). It’s a remarkable output number, given where domestic production was less than two decades ago.

Second point: Just as remarkable is the fact the United States’ world leadership in natural gas and oil production is accompanied by world leadership in cutting greenhouse gas emissions.


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Trade Policy Impacts on U.S. Energy Becoming Visible

crude oil exports  production  trade  monthly-stats-report 

Dean Foreman

Dean Foreman
Posted September 20, 2018

In API’s latest Industry Outlook and Monthly Statistical Report, we have shifted from recognizing risks on the horizon to having a line of sight on some of them.  The effects of trade disputes in particular have become tangible.

Most notably, at the same time as the U.S. celebrated another new record for crude oil production of 10.8 million barrels per day (mb/d), U.S. petroleum exports decreased by 1.3 mb/d over the past two months.  

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Record Oil Output, Yet Dip in Petroleum Exports Suggests Tariffs’ Effect

crude oil exports  oil production  trade 

Mark Green

Mark Green
Posted August 16, 2018

Lots of positive energy data points in API’s newest Monthly Statistical Report – and one that’s potentially concerning.

The good is that the U.S. tied its record for crude oil production in July at 10.7 million barrels per day (b/d) and set a new one for natural gas liquids, 4.4 million b/d. With total liquids production up by more than 2 million b/d compared to July 2017, the U.S. has accounted for almost all of the growth in world oil production so far in 2018 – more than compensating for production losses elsewhere around the world.

Now the potential point of concern. The U.S. petroleum trade balance retreated in July, perhaps the result – at least in part – of trade tensions prompted by new U.S. tariffs. Crude export were down 240,000 b/d last month, and refined products exports decreased 220,000 b/d.


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Think: U.S. Oil, Increased Access to Boost Global Supply

crude oil production  access  us energy security 

Mark Green

Mark Green
Posted July 20, 2018

Big news in the latest API Monthly Statistical Report: U.S. crude oil production rose to an all-time record of 10.7 million barrels per day (mbd) in June – the largest monthly output, ever. According to the MSR, June domestic crude production increased more than 100,000 barrels per day over May, and the total was 1.6 million barrels per day more than June a year ago. But let’s go back to that top-line number – 10.7 million barrels per day – and comprehend what it means:

Economic growth and jobs – but also our country’s energy security, supporting the promise of present and future prosperity and opportunity. That’s the gift of the American energy renaissance that, well, keeps on giving.

All of the above support an argument that – to ensure an adequate global supply of crude oil upon which the U.S. and global economies rely – we should look to sustain and grow domestic natural gas and oil production. 

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More Energy Impacts in U.S.-China Trade Standoff

trade  crude oil exports  china 

Mark Green

Mark Green
Posted June 20, 2018

Two charts pretty well capture the what’s at stake for U.S. energy – specifically exports of domestic crude oil – in an intensifying trade standoff between the United States and China.

According to U.S. Energy Information Administration figures, this is a very big deal. Big as in U.S. crude oil exports to China accounted for about one-fifth of all U.S. oil exports in 2017 – growing from basically nothing in 2013 to 81.6 million barrels last year.

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Why the U.S. Must Import and Export Oil

crude oil exports  refineries  gasoline prices  energy policy 

Dean Foreman

Dean Foreman
Posted June 14, 2018

With Wall Street Journal headlines such as “Trans-Atlantic Oil-Price Spread Soars as Supply Glut Disappears,” it might be hard to remember that the United States’ domestic oil production stood at a record 10.5 million barrels per day (mb/d) in April, and the nation’s petroleum trade balance is in its best position in 50 years. This has reinforced U.S. energy security, lowered the trade deficit and boosted economic growth.

That said, given our country’s much improved energy outlook, some may question why we’re still importing crude oil and refined products. And, while we’re still importing oil, why do we export domestic crude – especially when prices have risen at the pump?  Why don’t we just keep American oil at home? ... 

Answers are found in an understanding of basic market realities.

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The economic—and environmental—case for natural gas

gasoline prices  crude oil  gasoline blends  gasoline taxes  consumers 

Jessica  Lutz

Jessica Lutz
Posted May 31, 2018

In a recently released report, the U.N. Conference on Trade and Development digs into the factors that have made the U.S. energy dominance possible, and – specifically – the role of natural gas in energy dominance. 

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