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Energy Tomorrow Blog

Understanding the Benefits of Trade

trade  exports  crude oil demand  lng exports  access  job creation 

Mark Green

Mark Green
Posted December 26, 2013

Though there are compelling, Economics 101-type reasons the U.S. should lift its dated ban on crude oil exports and help clear the way for the export of U.S. liquefied natural gas (LNG), opponents of both continue to misunderstand the way global energy markets work – as well as the significant benefits accruing to the United States from free trade.

You’ve probably heard the rhetoric: Keep American oil and natural gas locked up here at home for U.S. consumers.

This misses the essential fact that crude oil is traded (and priced) globally, and that limiting LNG exports will only limit U.S. participation in an important, developing market – while effectively denying our country the infusion of overseas wealth in exchange for valuable American commodities.

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Pump Price Update

crude oil  crude oil demand  crude oil prices  economic growth  eia  energy information administration  energy prices  gasoline  gasoline prices  global demand  iea  international energy agency  oil demand  oil prices  prices 

Jane Van Ryan

Jane Van Ryan
Posted November 3, 2010

Are you planning a trip during the upcoming Thanksgiving Day holiday? For those of us in the Washington, D.C. area, the Wednesday before Thanksgiving is the single busiest day on surrounding highways during the entire year. 

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Gasoline Demand Slips

crude oil  demand  domestic energy  domestic petroleum deliveries  gasoline  gasoline demand  oil  oil demand  prices  crude oil production  gasoline deliveries 

Jane Van Ryan

Jane Van Ryan
Posted July 23, 2010

Gasoline demand fell for the first six months of 2010, API reported today. According to the Monthly Statistical Report, U.S. gasoline deliveries (a key indicator of demand) averaged 8.88 million barrels per day, 0.6 percent lower than in the same period in 2009. 

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New Rule Penalizes Petroleum

crude oil  demand  energy  energy reality  prices  supply  ftc 

Jane Van Ryan

Jane Van Ryan
Posted August 6, 2009

Today, the Federal Trade Commission (FTC) announced a new petroleum market "price manipulation" rule that could lead to a less competitive market--hurting American consumers of gasoline, diesel and other petroleum products. Furthermore, it could discourage companies from providing information to the marketplace. 

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Fuel Demand: An Economic Indicator

crude oil  demand  diesel  energy  energy reality  opec  supply 

Jane Van Ryan

Jane Van Ryan
Posted July 16, 2009

If you're looking for an indicator that describes the current economy, look no further than API's oil demand and supply statistics. API reported today that U.S. petroleum deliveries--a key measure of demand--in the first six months of 2009 fell to its lowest level for the time period in more than a decade. 

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Gasoline Prices: It's the Fundamentals

crude oil  demand  diesel  domestic access  energy  energy policy  gasoline prices  prices  supply 

Jane Van Ryan

Jane Van Ryan
Posted June 16, 2009

Gasoline prices have risen to an average of $2.67 a gallon, the highest price in the past eight months. API's Chief Economist John Felmy and Statistics Manager Ron Planting attribute the price rise largely to what they call "market fundamentals"--the basic law of supply and demand.

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Diesel Fuel: Priced Lower than Gasoline for the First Time in Nearly Two Years

crude oil  demand  diesel fuel  diesel prices  energy  energy reality  gasoline  prices 

Jane Van Ryan

Jane Van Ryan
Posted June 1, 2009

When economists are asked why the price of fuel fluctuates, they often explain that price changes are due to the "market"--the interaction of all of the people around the world who buy and sell crude oil and fuels in the global marketplace. These buyers and sellers decide how much oil and oil products they are willing to buy or sell at a given price. Their decisions can be affected by several factors including weather, refinery operations, and geopolitical and economic conditions. The price of other commodities, such as wheat and corn, are determined in much the same way. I touched on these points a bit in last Friday's post.

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