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Energy Tomorrow Blog

No Laughing Matter: E15 Still Poses Risks for Motorcyclists

consumers  e15  e10  renewable fuel standard  ethanol 

Mark Green

Mark Green
Posted September 25, 2018

More than three years ago we posted a blog with a humorous cartoon to highlight the distinctly unfunny risks that E15 gasoline poses for motorcycle-riding Americans. Unfortunately, as debate over ethanol mandates in the federal Renewable Fuel Standard (RFS) continues, those concerns remain. They’re heightened by the administration’s plan to facilitate year-round sales of E15, which contains 50 percent more ethanol than E10 fuel that’s standard across the country.

That’s a problem for owners of motorcycles – and also owners of all-terrain vehicles – because using E15 in them can void warranties. 

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EPA Should Protect Consumers from the Broken Ethanol Mandate

e10 blend wall  epa  rfs34  ethanol 

Jessica  Lutz

Jessica Lutz
Posted July 18, 2018

In the decade since the inception of the RFS, EPA has consistently implemented the mandate in a manner that dictates more and more ethanol into a fuels market regardless of whether market conditions can bear such an increase.  The ever-increasing volumes of ethanol in the fuel supply – more than can be used in E10 gasoline - inefficiently pushes fuels such as E15 into the marketplace. This puts consumers at risk because three out of four vehicles in the U.S. fleet were not built to use E15, including some model year 2018 cars and trucks from BMW, Mazda, Mercedes, Mitsubishi, Subaru and Volvo, among others. A number of automakers have said that using E15 could potentially void car warranties. Moreover, E15 is not compatible with motorcycles, boats, lawn equipment and ATVs. 

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Consumer Interests Ahead of Ethanol Interests

analysis  renewable fuel standard  rfs34  ethanol blends  epa  consumers  american petroleum institute  Jack Gerard  e85  e15  e10 blend wall 

Mark Green

Mark Green
Posted May 29, 2015

With EPA already embarrassingly late in setting requirements for ethanol in the fuel supply for 2014 (due 18 months ago) and 2015 (due six months ago), the agency finally has proposals for those years and 2016 that would continue to drive ethanol use – though not at levels dictated by the Renewable Fuel Standard (RFS).

Top EPA official Janet McCabe called the proposals “ambitious, but responsible.” We’ll agree on the ambitious part – in that it takes a whole lot of something to thread the needle between marketplace realities and the flawed RFS – difficult for the nimblest of bureaucracies, much less a regulatory colossus like EPA.

Unfortunately, EPA comes up short, particularly for 2016. An RFS program that long ago went awry remains lost in the tall weeds of process over substance.

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Ethanol Policy, E15 and Real-World Impacts

ethanol blends  e15  e10  renewable fuel standard  regulation  consumers  environmental impact 

Mark Green

Mark Green
Posted November 3, 2014

Sometimes the public policy debate occurs at an academic level, and it’s easy to overlook the impact on real Americans.  A good example is the campaign to push higher ethanol-blend fuels into the marketplace, which could negatively affect millions of consumers and hinder the broader economy. True enough, but we should also look at the real-world impacts of forcing increasing levels of ethanol into the fuel supply, impacts on individual Americans like Russell Garcia in Chicago.

Garcia owns five independent service stations in Chicago. He recently wrote a letter to the editor of the Chicago Tribune to point out the consequences of a city council proposal to require Chicago gas stations to carry E15 gasoline – fuel containing up to 15 percent ethanol, 50 percent more ethanol than the E10 gasoline that’s prevalent across the country.

Garcia wrote that E15 won’t deliver benefits promised by proponents, such as cost savings and environmental improvements. Instead, he wrote, it would impact consumers and small business owners like himself and ultimately be worse for the environment.

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No Time for Playing Politics with RFS

renewable fuel standard  ethanol blends  epa politics  consumers  e10 blend wall  e15  e85 

Mark Green

Mark Green
Posted September 11, 2014

Mixing politics and energy makes for bad energy policy. Exhibit A: the Renewable Fuel Standard (RFS).

We’ve posted a couple of times (here and here) on EPA’s failure to be on time with its annual requirements for ethanol use, which is critical for refiners to comply with the law. If you missed it, the 2014 requirements were due Nov. 30, 2013, nine months ago. That’s a broken program. Now politics may enter in where it shouldn’t.

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Big Ethanol’s E10 Giveaway

ethanol  renewable fuel standard  e10  e15  Economy 

Mark Green

Mark Green
Posted August 15, 2014

Helmets off – as in motorcycle helmets – to the Renewable Fuel Association (RFA) for conducting an E10 fuel giveaway at the Sturgis Motorcycle Rally earlier this month in South Dakota.

We know Big Ethanol prefers ethanol in stronger doses than E10 (up to 10 percent content), but RFA must realize its efforts to get more of the higher ethanol-blend E15 into the nation’s fuel supply has risks with certain audiences.

Take motorcycle enthusiasts. The American Motorcyclist Association (AMA) has been direct in its concerns about E15 in the fuel marketplace:

Inadvertent misfueling with E15 (15 percent ethanol by volume) fuel is a significant concern to AMA members. E15 use can void manufacturers’ warranties, and the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency has acknowledged that E15 can damage engines. Although the EPA has approved its use in 2001-and-newer light-duty vehicles – which include cars, light-duty trucks and medium-duty passenger vehicles – the EPA has not approved its use in the estimated 22 million motorcycles and ATVs currently in operation. … Preventing these inadvertent misfuelings has been one of the AMA’s main concerns, because a vast majority of motorcycles and ATVs on the road and trail in the United States today are not designed to run on ethanol blends higher than 10 percent. And many older machines favored by vintage motorcycle enthusiasts have problems with any ethanol in the fuel.

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CBO Flags Potential RFS Impacts on Consumers

renewable fuel standard  ethanol  e15  e10 blend wall  e85  consumers  cellulosic biofuels 

Mark Green

Mark Green
Posted June 27, 2014

Count the nonpartisan Congressional Budget Office (CBO) among those cautioning that rising ethanol mandates in the Renewable Fuel Standard (RFS) could negatively impact consumers. In a new analysis, CBO says RFS ethanol requirements by 2017 could cause an increase of 13 cents to 26 cents per gallon in the price of E10 gasoline, the most common vehicular fuel used in the U.S., a rise of 4 percent to 9 percent, and an increase of 30 cents to 51 cents per gallon in the price of petroleum-based diesel, or 9 percent to 14 percent.

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The RFS and Regulatory Uncertainty

renewable fuel standard  epa  ethanol  e15  e10 blend wall  e85  cellulosic biofuels 

Mark Green

Mark Green
Posted April 30, 2014

In seeking regulatory certainty, compliance with rules and deadlines and policies that acknowledge market realities, industry is hardly being unreasonable. Unfortunately, these are scarce in EPA’s setting of new ethanol use levels under the Renewable Fuel Standard (RFS).

Let’s start with deadlines. Under the law EPA was supposed to tell refiners by the end of last November how much ethanol would have to be blended into the U.S. fuel supply this year. Four months into the year, refiners are still waiting. That’s regulatory uncertainty.

Market reality? EPA continues to signal on cellulosic biofuels that the 2014 mandate will have no connection to actual commercial production – setting up an absurd situation where refiners could be penalized because a “phantom fuel” doesn’t exist in commercial volumes necessary to satisfy the mandate.

Hello, EPA, can we talk?

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On RFS, 'This Is All About Consumers'

consumers  renewable fuel standard  ethanol blends  e15  e10 blend wall  e85  epa 

Mark Green

Mark Green
Posted December 10, 2013

EPA held the first of a series of public hearings last week on its 2014 ethanol use proposals under the Renewable Fuel Standard (RFS), during which the National Chicken Council’s Mike Brown observed that the Washington, D.C., hearing basically attracted three groups of people: ethanol producers, corn producers and “the rest of us.”

Quite a bit of truth there. The debate over the RFS finds ethanol backers fairly isolated in arguing that the RFS is fine the way it is and that higher-ethanol blend fuels – like E15 and E85 – should be pushed more aggressively into the marketplace to satisfy the program’s mandates.

The stance has them at odds a number of interests, including consumer and food groups, auto manufacturers, the makers of small-engine vehicles and equipment, turkey and chicken producers, restaurant owners and more. Strikingly, AAA, the venerable travel/motoring organization, has been criticized by Big Ethanol for opposing wider use of E15, which studies have shown could damage engines in vehicles not designed to use it. 

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