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Energy Tomorrow Blog

Natural Gas, Lower Methane Emissions and Rising Opportunity

natural gas from shale  emission reductions  methane  the-environmental-partnership 

Mark Green

Mark Green
Posted August 19, 2019

Even with natural gas playing a leading role in reducing U.S. energy-related carbon dioxide emissions to their lowest levels in a generation and strong industry initiative to keep lowering production-related methane emissions, natural gas opponents remain on the attack, including a new study that's critical of natural gas from North American shale (see rebuttals, here and here).

More authoritative and trustworthy is the National Oceanic Atmospheric Administration (NOAA), which issued these methane-related conclusions in a study published earlier this year …

U.S. natural gas has proven environmental and climate benefits, and it’s critically important here at home and around the world, helping to reduce energy poverty and improve peoples’ lives.


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American LNG Powers the World

lng exports  natural gas benefits  emission reductions 

Dustin Meyer

Dustin Meyer
Posted August 15, 2019

By now, the advantages of the American energy revolution are familiar. Soaring production in U.S. shale plays is delivering abundant, affordable and clean natural gas, which is increasingly displacing coal in our energy mix. Today, domestic emissions are at their lowest levels in over 25 years, due in no small part to fuel switching and low-cost natural gas.

While these trends have benefited Americans for more than a decade, an equally exciting story is emerging abroad. Growing exports of U.S. liquefied natural gas (LNG) are spreading these economic and environmental advantages to our allies across the globe.

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Flaring, Infrastructure and Embracing the Dual Challenge

natural gas  methane emissions  emission reductions  climate  safe operations 

Mark Green

Mark Green
Posted August 8, 2019

Our country needs abundant energy AND climate progress – both of them, continuing to advance together, as they have in the U.S. in recent years. Embracing the dual challenge of making energy abundant and accessible while reducing energy-related emissions is the realistic path to growth and opportunity that can broadly benefit the nation and the lives of individual Americans.

Certainly, our industry is focused on new innovations and technologies that continue to reduce emissions from natural gas and oil production and improve the environmental performance of our operations and facilities. …

The objective is continued progress. High-production areas, including the Permian Basin in Texas and New Mexico and the Bakken in North Dakota and Montana, need additional pipeline infrastructure to take away natural gas when it accompanies oil production. More infrastructure could reduce the amount of flaring – regulated, limited burning of methane – that takes place.

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Environmental Partnership: Paving the Way for Continuous Progress

the-environmental-partnership  emission reductions  methane  climate 

API CEO Mike Sommers

Mike Sommers
Posted July 30, 2019

We’re proud of the work of The Environmental Partnership – an industry-led initiative launched in 2017 that is leading the way to further reduce methane emissions from energy operations.

With 65 members to date, The Partnership serves as a model for industry leadership on shared environmental goals and creating pathways for new technologies and techniques – like optical gas imaging cameras, drones and other devices – to drive down emissions, while providing the energy vital to every American family and business.

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U.S. LNG Exports Deliver Economic, Environmental Benefits

lng exports  trade  emission reductions  china 

API CEO Mike Sommers

Mike Sommers
Posted July 11, 2019

Exports of U.S. liquefied natural gas (LNG) are set to jump a projected 72 percent this year compared to 2018, and the emergence of the U.S. as one of the world’s largest LNG suppliers is good news for the American economy. Research shows LNG exports could generate up to 452,000 U.S. jobs, and add up to $74 billion annually to U.S. GDP, by 2035.

The environmental benefits are no less significant.

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U.S. LNG and Cleaner, Healthier Lives Across the Globe

natural gas benefits  emission reductions  carbon dioxide  methane  climate 

Mark Green

Mark Green
Posted July 2, 2019

There’s very little that satisfies climate extremists – including practical solutions right at hand.

We live in a world where a huge chunk of the globe’s energy is supplied by burning coal, biofuels and waste. U.S. natural gas – exported as liquefied natural gas (LNG) – is an integral part of the world’s emissions solution, not the enemy some of these folks portray it to be. ...

We can do better than the dark future advocated by opponents of natural gas and oil. And exporting some of America’s abundance is opportunity for others to live better, healthier lives. 

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Right Under Our Feet

natural gas  electricity  emission reductions  carbon dioxide 

Mark Green

Mark Green
Posted June 25, 2019

Ten years ago this month the Waxman-Markey cap-and-trade bill died in Congress, and many still argue for a legislative solution to the challenge of U.S. greenhouse gas emissions. Happily for the United States, there’s a solution right under our feet – one that has led the way on emissions reductions, eclipsing what supporters of Waxman-Markey projected for their proposal, while fueling American economic growth and a range of consumer benefits.

It’s natural gas. Together with advanced technologies, many of them innovated by our industry, abundant natural gas has been the agent for progress on multiple fronts.  


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GAO Report – Another Reason to Sunset the RFS

ethanol  renewable fuel standard  consumers  gasoline prices  emission reductions 

Jessica  Lutz

Jessica Lutz
Posted June 11, 2019

We’ve warned before (see here, here and here) that the broken Renewable Fuel Standard (RFS) and its mandates for ever-increasing ethanol use put consumers at risk. And that the administration’s recent decision to allow summer sales of E15 fuel – a blend containing 50 percent more ethanol than the E10 gasoline that’s widespread across the country – is an ineffective approach to addressing concerns with the RFS that will only serve to make things worse. Now, we can add another report to the long list of evidence that the RFS needs to be sunset – this time coming from the non-partisan U.S. Government Accountability Office (GAO).

The GAO recently reviewed the effects of the RFS and found that requiring the use of corn-based ethanol and biodiesel in gasoline supplies hasn’t lowered pump prices or significantly reduced greenhouse gas emissions – two of the main goals of the flawed RFS program. In fact, the review finds that gas prices outside of the corn-rich Midwest likely increased because of the program. To make matters worse, the review also found that there has been little, if any, reduction in greenhouse gas emissions – a main selling point used by proponents to justify the program. 

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Natural Gas and Oil – Securing America’s Interests and Safety

us energy security  military  emission reductions  climate change 

Mark Green

Mark Green
Posted June 4, 2019

Some important points as the U.S. House Select Committee on Intelligence meets this week to talk about the impacts of climate change on U.S. security interests, global humanitarian conditions and other issues.

First, U.S. security is the responsibility of the U.S. military, which is the largest government user of energy, ranking ahead of many countries in overall energy use. More than any other energy sources and by a wide margin, natural gas and oil power America’s military.

Second, U.S. national security is directly tied to having access to safe, reliable, abundant energy and also decreasing dependence on energy supplied by other nations. Thanks to the U.S. energy revolution, resulting in record oil production, America’s dependence on others has fallen significantly since 2006.

Third, on the humanitarian issue, U.S. natural gas and oil offer a golden opportunity to lift regions and even entire countries out of energy poverty – with power for electricity that’s unavailable to nearly 1 billion people on earth and clean fuel for home heating and cooking, which about 2.7 billion people currently live without.


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NOAA Study Increases Understanding of Methane Emissions

methane  emission reductions  natural gas 

Mark Green

Mark Green
Posted May 24, 2019

There’s lots to know and understand from a new NOAA study on U.S. methane emissions from 2006-2015, starting with the study finding that there has been “major overestimation” of industry’s methane emissions trends in some previous studies.

While U.S. natural gas production has increased 46 percent since 2006, scientists found “no significant increase” in total U.S. methane emissions. During this same period, the NOAA study found only a “modest” increase in emissions from natural gas and oil activity. (In the context of surging natural gas production – emissions intensity, or emissions per unit production – industry emissions are even smaller.)


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