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Energy Tomorrow Blog

Video: Fracking Water Use, in Context

analysis  hydraullic fracturing  horizontal drilling  fracking  water  energy 

Mark Green

Mark Green
Posted September 23, 2015

A new EnergyFromShale.org video shows the relatively tiny amount of water needed to develop U.S. energy with safe hydraulic fracturing – the chief reason (along with advanced horizontal drilling) that the United States now is the world’s No. 1 producer of oil and natural gas

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Broad Benefits Result From Developing American Energy

domestic production  keystone xl pipeline  fracking  water management  oil and natural gas 

Mark Green

Mark Green
Posted April 7, 2014

U.S. Energy Boom Lifts Low-Income Workers Too

Wall Street Journal op-ed (subscription required): Mayors, governors and economic-development officials love natural-resource jobs—and today's North American energy revolution has been providing a lot of them. According to the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics, the number of new jobs in the oil and gas industry (technically a part of mining) increased by roughly 270,000 between 2003 and 2012. This is an increase of about 92% compared with a 3% increase in all jobs during the same period.

The people of New York and other states that have so far declined to take part in the boom might like to know what they are missing because these jobs pay well. The BLS reports that the U.S. average annual wage (which excludes employer-paid benefits) in the oil and gas industry was about $107,200 during 2012, the latest full year available. That's more than double the average of $49,300 for all workers.

At the other end of the wage spectrum are waiters and waitresses in food services nationwide earning about $16,200 a year, workers in the accommodations industry with average pay of $27,300, and those in the retail trade with average wages of $27,700. But the evidence from the oil boom regions is that energy development lifts wages for low-income workers too.

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Hydraulic Fracturing’s Global Impact and American Opportunity

american energy  global markets  hydraulic fracturing  fracking  water management 

Mary Leshper

Mary Schaper
Posted November 11, 2013

There Would Be No Iranian Nuclear Talks if not for Fracking

Bloomberg Businessweek:  Lost in some of the forecasting over what an agreement may eventually entail is the simple fact that none of this would be possible without the U.S. oil boom. Over the last two years, the U.S. has increased its crude production by about 2 million barrels a day. That’s like swallowing Norway, the fourteenth largest oil producer in the world. This new U.S. crude supply has allowed the West to put the squeeze on Iran without disrupting the global market or jacking up the price. 

According to a recent report from the Congressional Research Service (pdf), Iran’s oil exports have been cut in half since 2011, from 2.5 million barrels per day to a bit more than 1 million today. As a result, Iran has had to halt an equal amount of production.

The fact that this has all happened without the slightest disruption felt in the oil market is extraordinary. 

“I think it’s pretty clear that without the U.S. shale revolution, it never would have been possible to put this kind of embargo on Iran,” says Julius Walker, a global energy market strategist with UBS Securities (UBS). “Without U.S. production gains, I think we’d be looking at $150 a barrel,” says Walker. Instead, international prices have hovered around $110, and are less than $100 in the U.S.

 

Read more: http://bit.ly/1hAoafL

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Good News for American Energy

american energy  hydraulic fracturing  fracking  water contamination  taxes  keystone xl 

Mary Leshper

Mary Schaper
Posted October 8, 2013

Texas Continues to Lead the Shale Oil and Natural Gas Revolution

Forbes: Almost lost in all the news about the federal government “shutdown” (which has somehow left 83% of the government funded and functioning) over the last week are several new reports regarding the ongoing massive oil and natural gas Shale Revolution in the United States, and the role Texas is playing in making it happen…

When one includes condensate production from natural gas wells, Texas produced over 2.6 million BOPD in July, fully 35% of the nation’s petroleum production.  Just a little more than 2 years ago, in April 2011, Texas’s daily oil production was 1.3 million BOPD, accounting for just 20% of total US production.  That’s a phenomenal increase in only two years.  The state’s current production level would rank it 13th among all countries on earth, and the rate of increase will almost certainly move the state into the top ten within the next 12 months.

 

Read more: http://onforb.es/18N2qWO

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