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Energy Tomorrow Blog

Domestic Oil Production and the ‘Teachable Moment’

regulations  natural gas  liquid fuels  imports  domestic oil production  access 

Mark Green

Mark Green
Posted January 9, 2013

The U.S. Energy Information Administration’s Short-Term Energy Outlook released this week contains two important crude oil stats:

  • U.S. domestic production is expected to continue growing rapidly over the next two years, from an average of 6.4 million barrels per day (bbl/d) last year to 7.3 million bbl/d in 2013 and 7.9 million bbl/d in 2014. Much of the production growth will come from drilling in tight plays in the Williston (North Dakota and Montana), Western Gulf and Permian basins (Texas).
  • U.S. liquid fuel imports, including crude oil, are expected to decline to an average of 6 million bbl/d by 2014. EIA says the net import share will average 32 percent in 2014 “because of continued substantial increases in domestic crude oil production.”

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Made in America: Increase Access for Secure Energy Future

access  anwr  domestic energy  energy policy  federal lands  liquid fuels  offshore drilling  onshore drilling  private lands 

Mark Green

Mark Green
Posted May 21, 2012

American-made energy. With the Energy Information Administration projecting that the United States will need more than 16 percent additional energy by 2035, the idea that we could, before then, see 100 percent of our liquid fuel needs met domestically and from Canada is huge. Make that gigantic.

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The President’s Fuzzy Energy Future

taxes  offshore drilling  natural gas  liquid fuels  gulf of mexico  domestic energy  anwr  access 

Kyle Isakower

Kyle Isakower
Posted March 16, 2012

Yesterday President Obama gave a campaign speech centered around energy policy.  In it he said:

“There’s a problem with a strategy that only relies on drilling and that is, America uses more than 20 percent of the world’s oil.  If we drilled every square inch of this country -- so we went to your house and we went to the National Mall and we put up those rigs everywhere -- we’d still have only 2 percent of the world’s known oil reserves.  Let’s say we miss something -- maybe it’s 3 percent instead of two.  We’re using 20; we have two.  Now, you don’t need to be getting an excellent education at Prince George’s Community College to know that we’ve got a math problem here.  I help out Sasha occasionally with her math homework and I know that if you’ve got two and you’ve got 20, there’s a gap.  (Laughter.)  There’s a gap, right?”

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