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Energy Tomorrow Blog

Energy Opportunities Abound for Trump Administration

100-days  natural gas  infrastructure  energy policies  trump 

Jack Gerard

Jack Gerard
Posted January 26, 2017

The first 100 days of a new presidential administration present an opportunity to establish priorities that will guide government policy for the next four years. Maintaining and strengthening the U.S. advantage as the world’s leading producer and refiner of oil and natural gas should be a top focus – not only for our energy security but for the economic, national security and environmental benefits oil and natural gas reliably provide.

The American people have a firm understanding of the importance of oil and natural gas. Recent survey results reveal that more than 80 percent of voters agree that U.S. oil and natural gas production can help achieve each of their most important priorities: job creation, economic growth, lower energy costs and energy security.

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Making the Most of the U.S. Energy Revolution

energy policies  exxonmobil  trade  energy exports  fracking  taxes  tax revenue 

Mark Green

Mark Green
Posted March 13, 2015

UPI – U.S. policymakers are called on to adopt the energy policies necessary to take advantage of the new era of abundance, the chairman of Exxon Mobil said.

Some energy companies with a focus on exploration and production are advocating for a repeal of a ban on the export of some domestically-produced crude oil. The ban was enacted in the 1970s in response to an export embargo from Arab members of the Organization of Petroleum Exporting Countries.

Exxon Chief Executive Officer Rex Tillerson led the drive, telling an audience at The Economic Club in Washington D.C. current policies are out of step with the energy landscape in the shale era.

"It is time to build policies that reflect our newfound abundance, that view the future with optimism, that recognize the power of free markets to drive innovation, and that proceed with the conviction that free trade brings prosperity and progress," he said in a Thursday address.

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Sound Policy for a Sound Energy Future

Energy Security  Economy  jobs  Policies  keystone xl  alaska  fracking 

Mary Leshper

Mary Schaper
Posted January 23, 2015

Forbes (Loren Steffy): President Obama didn’t say much about energy in his State of the Union speech Tuesday. Last year, he focused on energy issues more, and devoted much of the energy portions of his speech to natural gas. This year, he acknowledged rising U.S. oil production and the benefits of cheap energy that have come with it, and then he made a backhanded reference to the Keystone XL pipeline. In calling on both parties to support the infrastructure projects such as “modern ports, strong bridges, faster trains and faster internet,” he then encouraged lawmakers to pass a bipartisan infrastructure plan by saying: “So let’s set our sights higher than a single oil pipeline.” Certainly, the Keystone pipeline has become a far greater political punching bag than a meaningful piece of infrastructure. Environmentalists have greatly exaggerated its role in climate change, and Republicans in Congress are now determined to push through legislation supporting it almost out of spite for the administration’s foot-dragging on a decision.

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Energy Rhetoric vs. Action

energy policies  keystone xl pipeline  president obama  state of the union  oil and natural gas development  state of american energy  Jack Gerard  economic benefits  state department  canadian oil sands 

Mark Green

Mark Green
Posted January 21, 2015

In a State of the Union address that mostly skimmed over energy issues – remarkable, given the generational opportunities stemming from America’s ongoing energy revolution – President Obama still underscored the yawning disconnect between his all-of-the-above energy rhetoric and his administration’s failure to put that rhetoric into action.

Talking about the need for infrastructure investment, the president said:

“Democrats and Republicans used to agree on this. So let’s set our sights higher than a single oil pipeline. Let’s pass a bipartisan ... infrastructure plan that could create more than 30 times as many jobs per year and make this country stronger for decades to come. Let’s do it. Let’s get it done.”

We agree. America’s infrastructure needs are greater than a single oil pipeline – the political football known as the Keystone XL – which the president has been punting around for more than six years.

But there’s no good reason, no good excuse, for not making the Keystone XL pipeline Job No. 1 in a procession of infrastructure projects. President Obama hasn’t offered any beyond calling “temporary” the 42,100 jobs the U.S. State Department has said Keystone XL would support. Yet, those jobs are no more temporary than the ones that would be supported by building bridges, roads and other projects the president routinely cites.

That’s the disconnect between what President Obama peddles in speeches to Congress and around the country – and what his administration is doing.

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Energy and Leadership

energy policies  oil and natural gas development  domestic production  energy exports  access  regulation  offshore drilling  hydraulic fracturing  horizontal drilling 

Mark Green

Mark Green
Posted December 1, 2014

There’s a new global energy order – with the United States at the hub. That’s the assessment in a number of articles following last week’s meeting of oil-exporting countries.

The benefits to America are manifold. The U.S. as global energy’s new center of gravity means economic strength here at home through jobs, consumer benefits and greater energy security, and the opportunity to project positive American values abroad – by impacting global markets as discussed above and by helping friends overseas through energy exports. All result from America’s energy revolution, built on safe development of oil and natural gas reserves from shale and other tight-rock with advanced hydraulic fracturing and horizontal drilling.

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American Energy: Central to Our Lives, Future

energy policies  oil and natural gas development  louisiana  louisiana oil gas association  economic growth  offshore development  onshore development 

Mark Green

Mark Green
Posted September 11, 2014

Interesting energy discussion this week from New Orleans at a town hall event hosted by The Atlantic – where the focus was on infrastructure, jobs and economic growth, and the need for sensible, bipartisan energy policymaking.

There was no better place for such a conversation and certainly no better time – with our ongoing domestic energy revolution lifting the United States to global energy superpower status: No. 1 in natural gas production and expected to be No. 1 in oil production next year. This development is helping drive the economy forward, creating jobs, opportunity and greater U.S. energy security. Indeed, energy’s national economic impact is seen in a new survey of the 30,000 businesses, in every state and the District of Columbia, that support domestic energy development.

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Study: Shale Energy Benefits Schools, State and Local Governments

shale energy  shale benefits  energy costs  fracking  economic benefits  energy policies 

Mark Green

Mark Green
Posted June 5, 2014

A new study details the way America’s unconventional energy revolution – oil and natural gas safely developed from shale and other tight-rock formations with advanced hydraulic fracturing and horizontal drilling – is benefiting Americans where they live.

The new analysis by IHS shows that electricity and natural gas cost savings from shale energy is, in turn, saving billions of dollars for the nation’s school districts and state and local governments.

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The State of the Union and Our New Energy Reality

energy policies  job creation  economic growth  oil and natural gas development  infrastructure  keystone xl pipeline 

Mark Green

Mark Green
Posted January 29, 2014

Energy issue positives from President Obama’s State of the Union address Tuesday night:

Crediting surging domestic oil and natural gas production for adding jobs, creating economic growth and revitalizing the manufacturing sector.

Recognizing that because of domestic output the U.S. “is closer to energy independence than we have been in decades.” 

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Energy Policy Matters

Policies  hydraulic fracturing  keystone xl  biofuels  ethanol 

Mary Leshper

Mary Schaper
Posted September 24, 2013

Progress, Not Perfection, in Tackling Global energy Challenges: WEC Report

Breaking Energy: The US, which ranks at number 15 on the 2013 Energy Sustainability Index, is facing serious challenges to improving its place on the index, and more importantly, its energy sector investment outlook, because of policy uncertainty. The recent moves by the Obama Administration to regulate carbon emissions from coal-fired power plants are, despite the President’s good intentions, “the worst kind of thing that can happen” in energy policy design, Mark Robson said. “The value of … doing nothing has gone up.”

“It’s not enough for the policy to be good, it needs to be implemented well,” MacNaughton said, echoing Robson’s point. Companies can now expect a period of lobbying and litigation over the EPA carbon rule adjustment proposal that delays investment and corporate decision making still further in a country with a rapidly aging power sector, MacNaughton said.

Read more: http://bit.ly/18nRBZQ

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