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Energy Tomorrow Blog

Policies to Support American Energy Leadership

state of the union  american energy  Energy Security 

Sam Winstel

Sam Winstel
Posted February 6, 2020

During this week’s State of the Union address, President Trump kept with the decades-long tradition – and agreed with each of his six predecessors – by acknowledging the economic importance of domestic natural gas and oil production and outlining the policy pathways to a stronger energy future. The president noted that the U.S. has become the No. 1 producer of natural gas and oil anywhere in the world, by far, and that energy jobs are a record high.

Today, America is not only the world’s leading energy producer, for the first time in nearly 60 years, the U.S. is also a net exporter of total energy. As recently as 2009, energy imports represented 44% of the national trade deficit, but dropped to 5.2% in 2018 and then 1.2% in the first 10 months of 2019.

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American Energy Powers the State of the Union

state of the union  american energy  Energy Security 

API CEO Mike Sommers

Mike Sommers
Posted February 4, 2020

For decades, American presidents across the political spectrum have outlined their policy proposals to Congress at the State of the Union. Ideologies come and go with each transition of power. But every president from Jimmy Carter to Donald Trump has agreed that affordable, reliable, and homegrown energy is essential to the country’s economic growth, national security, and overall prosperity.

Historically, U.S. energy policy was driven by our ambition to reduce dependence on foreign natural gas and oil, but times have thankfully changed. In 2020, the State of American Energy is one of domestic leadership in natural gas and oil production and progress toward global climate solutions.

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Energy, the Common Ground for Our Union

oil and natural gas  state of the union  president  congress 

Mark Green

Mark Green
Posted February 6, 2019

Tuesday night’s State of the Union message was aimed at Washington finding common ground to work for the American people. President Trump said policymakers should embrace the “boundless potential of cooperation, compromise and the common good.” It struck a chord; more than seven in 10 Americans said they liked the speech’s approach and tone.

The challenge now is to move beyond rhetorical flourishes to action. Think: energy. In the quest for the common ground to do the common good, lawmakers can start with energy.

Energy is America’s strong suit. 

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Energy Makes State of Our Union Strong

state of the union  oil and natural gas  infrastructure  everything  spill 

Mark Green

Mark Green
Posted January 31, 2018

So, there was scant, direct mention of energy during Tuesday night’s State of the Union. We’re glad the president devoted some time to the country’s need for more infrastructure – just look at New England! – and he also talked about a new era of embracing American energy, also good. At the same time, we’d argue virtually everything the president highlighted during his speech involves energy in some way. The economy, national security, bettering the lives of Americans – all of these are connected to natural gas and oil and/or its development. Which is what we’ve been saying: energy is everything, and energy is powering Americans past impossible.

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The Imperative of the U.S. Energy Trade [R]evolution

state of the union  trade  oil and natural gas  us energy security 

Dean Foreman

Dean Foreman
Posted January 30, 2018

For the first installment of my API Chart of the Month series, let’s look at a pair of charts that show the strengthening of U.S. trade positions for petroleum – crude oil and refined products – and natural gas – supported by trade pacts such as the North American Free Trade Agreement (NAFTA). This is especially timely given the possibility trade will come up during tonight’s State of the Union address. 

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Keep U.S. Energy Gains Going

state of the union  oil and natural gas  us energy security  economic growth  regulation  trade  access 

Mark Green

Mark Green
Posted January 29, 2018

Looking ahead to Tuesday night’s State of the Union Address, let’s hope the speech helps Washington focus on accelerating gains made by U.S. energy over the past several months. America’s natural gas and oil renaissance has boosted the economy and Americans’ individual prosperity while strengthening our country’s security and making significant environmental strides. Time to double down on that progress.

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U.S. Energy Revolution Missing in State of the Union

american energy  president obama  state of the union  oil and natural gas production  emission reductions  economic growth 

Jack Gerard

Jack Gerard
Posted January 21, 2016

It’s become a State of the Union tradition: President Obama touts the benefits of oil and natural gas production without identifying the American energy revolution as their source. This year, the president implied that government investments in wind and solar are the reason the United States has “cut our imports of foreign oil by nearly 60 percent, and cut carbon pollution more than any other country on Earth.”

“Gas under two bucks a gallon ain’t bad, either,” he continued.

The New York Times was quick with a rebuttal, writing: “Private oil and gas companies, however, were a driving force behind the most important changes in the United States’ energy landscape over the past seven years: lower fossil fuel emissions and a reduction in dependence on imported oil. … A glut of domestic oil has helped lower prices and imports. The new supply of domestic natural gas has helped lower greenhouse gas emissions. Electric utilities have traditionally relied on coal as the cheapest fuel source, but turned to natural gas as it became cheaper.”

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Natural Gas for Energy, Economy and the Environment

state of the union  american energy  president obama  oil and natural gas development  environmental impact  economic growth 

Mark Green

Mark Green
Posted January 12, 2016

During his last State of the Union address, President Obama could declare victory – an energy victory that has seen surging domestic production, lower consumer costs, economic growth and environmental progress, all happening together, on his watch. The president can say this U.S. model is winning the day, because it is. He should say this model is exportable to the world, because it is.

Fact: The U.S. is the world’s No. 1 producer of oil and natural gas. The domestic revolution in the production of oil and gas has reduced net oil imports and positioned the U.S. to claim its place as a major player in global energy markets. At the same time, the U.S. is leading the world in reducing greenhouse gas emissions.

Fact: Affordable natural gas – the average price at the national benchmark Henry Hub in 2015 was the lowest since 1999 – is largely the reason wholesale electricity prices at major trading hubs (on a monthly average for on-peak hours) were down 27 percent to 37 percent across the U.S. last year compared to 2014. That’s a real benefit for consumers.

Fact: Natural gas is winning in the marketplace. This is reflected in data from the U.S. Energy Information Administration showing the change in annual U.S. energy consumption by fuel source over the past decade.

These are all characteristics of the U.S. model, a market-driven model for energy growth, consumer benefits and climate progress. The president can own it. We wouldn’t mind a bit.

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Energy Rhetoric vs. Action

energy policies  keystone xl pipeline  president obama  state of the union  oil and natural gas development  state of american energy  Jack Gerard  economic benefits  state department  canadian oil sands 

Mark Green

Mark Green
Posted January 21, 2015

In a State of the Union address that mostly skimmed over energy issues – remarkable, given the generational opportunities stemming from America’s ongoing energy revolution – President Obama still underscored the yawning disconnect between his all-of-the-above energy rhetoric and his administration’s failure to put that rhetoric into action.

Talking about the need for infrastructure investment, the president said:

“Democrats and Republicans used to agree on this. So let’s set our sights higher than a single oil pipeline. Let’s pass a bipartisan ... infrastructure plan that could create more than 30 times as many jobs per year and make this country stronger for decades to come. Let’s do it. Let’s get it done.”

We agree. America’s infrastructure needs are greater than a single oil pipeline – the political football known as the Keystone XL – which the president has been punting around for more than six years.

But there’s no good reason, no good excuse, for not making the Keystone XL pipeline Job No. 1 in a procession of infrastructure projects. President Obama hasn’t offered any beyond calling “temporary” the 42,100 jobs the U.S. State Department has said Keystone XL would support. Yet, those jobs are no more temporary than the ones that would be supported by building bridges, roads and other projects the president routinely cites.

That’s the disconnect between what President Obama peddles in speeches to Congress and around the country – and what his administration is doing.

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The State of American Energy is Strong

american energy  Economy  Energy Security  jobs  fracking  state of the union  state of american energy 

Mary Leshper

Mary Schaper
Posted January 21, 2015

The eight states at the heart of the American shale oil revolution all grew faster than the U.S. national average over the last decade, according to the U.S. Bureau of Economic Analysis (BEA), underscoring the importance of oil production to the U.S. economy. Gross domestic product (GDP) attributable to private industry grew at a compound annual rate (CAGR) of 1.8 percent between 2002 and 2013 for the nation as a whole, after allowing for inflation. But for the eight states at the centre of the shale oil revolution, all of which have increased their production by at least 20,000 barrels per day since 2008, private sector GDP growth has been much faster.

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