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Energy Tomorrow Blog

The Common Ground of Emissions Reduction

emission reductions  carbon dioxide emissions  methane emissions  the-environmental-partnership  cera 

Mark Green

Mark Green
Posted March 5, 2021

We don’t yet know the full extent of the Biden administration’s strategy for U.S. energy. As API President and CEO Mike Sommers has said repeatedly since the election, our industry is ready to work with the administration for a better economy, cleaner environment and progress toward climate goals. Based on remarks by former Secretary of State John Kerry at the CERAWeek conference, there’s important common ground for a cooperative relationship.

“I don’t object per se to fossil fuel," said the president's special envoy for climate. "I object to the byproduct of fossil fuel, which is the carbon. That’s the problem, and the methane, that's another major problem emerging. So, we have to be able to abate. It’s the debate between unabated and abated production.”

Common ground: The natural gas and oil industry also is for abating carbon emissions – and has been working to reduce carbon and capture methane, through innovation and technology, for some time.

Industry investment, innovation and problem-solving on emissions came up so often during CERAWeek, it was hard to track them all. If, as Kerry said, the administration sees carbon and methane emissions as the targets – and not the energy from natural gas and oil – industry not only is a willing partner, it’s one that’s tackling those challenges head on.

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Expanding Educational Opportunity For a More Diverse Workforce

industry standards  workforce  jobs 

Lem Smith

Lem Smith
Posted March 4, 2021

The natural gas and oil industry is preparing for the future by investing in the next generation of engineers, scientists and problem solvers. We’re committed to attracting and retaining a diverse, inclusive and resilient workforce of men and women ready to tackle the world’s energy and climate challenges.

Expanding access to educational opportunities is essential in this endeavor.

To this end, the American Petroleum Institute (API) and the Louisiana Mid-Continent Oil & Gas Association (LMOGA) are excited to announce two new additions to the industry’s Minority Serving Institution (MSI) initiative. 

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CERAWeek: Sommers Talks Cooperation, Jobs and Energy Security

jobs  us energy security  climate  cera 

Mark Green

Mark Green
Posted March 2, 2021

The natural gas and oil industry is foundational to the U.S. economy and security today and will be for decades to come. That’s reality – and a welcome one, given U.S. world leadership in natural gas and oil production. Natural gas and oil frame the issues of energy and environmental progress – the priorities of safely producing the affordable reliable energy Americans use every day and boosting the economy, while also reducing emissions and our industry’s environmental footprint. We can do both, together.

API President and CEO Mike Sommers underscored these themes at this week’s CERAWeek energy conference – virtual this year because of the pandemic. Sommers’ key points: The natural gas and oil industry will work with the Biden administration as much as possible to achieve progress on climate goals – including technology and regulation; natural gas and oil are fundamental to U.S. security and world leadership; and natural gas and oil is supporting U.S. and world growth, as well as the high-paying jobs of millions of Americans.

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Federal Legislation Supports CCUS as Economy-Wide Climate Solution

ccs technology  carbon capture  carbon dioxide emissions  economic benefits 

John Siciliano

John D. Siciliano
Posted March 1, 2021

The COVID-19 relief and government spending bill passed by Congress in December, the Energy Act of 2020, included an important boost for carbon-capture utilization and storage (CCUS) technology – a must-have as an economy-wide way to address the risks of climate change. ...

 

The natural gas and oil industry, along with groups representing a broad range of industry sectors, have demonstrated continued and growing support for CCUS, and believe the Energy Act of 2020 lends critical support for key research and innovation to reduce the nation’s carbon footprint.

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In U.S. Rep. Haaland, There’s Common Ground for a Working Relationship

interior department  federal leases  infrastructure  us energy security 

Mark Green

Mark Green
Posted February 26, 2021

In introducing U.S. Rep. Debra Haaland – President Biden’s choice to be Interior Department secretary – to the Senate’s Energy and Natural Resources Committee, Congressman Don Young of Alaska, a staunch Republican, predicted this about his House colleague: “You’ll find out that she will listen to you.”

Given the political polarization in Washington, that’s pretty significant – and hugely important in building a bipartisan approach to energy, infrastructure and other issues associated with national economic growth, security and the environment.

The natural gas and oil industry welcomes the opportunity – if Rep. Haaland is confirmed by the full Senate – to work with her as her department manages millions of acres of federal lands and waters that are key to our country’s energy present and future.

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Why Energy Infrastructure Is an Opportunity for Bipartisanship

infrastructure  pipelines  labor unions  economic growth 

Lem Smith

Lem Smith
Posted February 25, 2021

The natural gas and oil industry shares the ambition of President Biden and Congress to accelerate economic recovery for all Americans. As policymakers consider the nation’s energy security and opportunities for future job creation, it is important not to overlook our critical energy infrastructure.

That reality came into stark focus last week, when winter storms and surging energy demand caused power outages across Texas and other parts of the U.S. Millions of residents were without electricity, water and heat amid frigid temperatures. The treacherous conditions served as a reminder that an all-of-the-above approach to energy along with durable infrastructure are essential to powering life in America without interruption.

When it comes to heating homes, fueling cars or simply keeping the lights on, America’s extensive pipeline network ensures widespread access to affordable, reliable fuels. But we cannot stop there.

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Is the World About to See an Oil Shortage?

oil supply and demand  production  global energy 

Dean Foreman

Dean Foreman
Posted February 24, 2021

It’s possible we could be headed for a shortfall in global oil supply as soon as next year – pretty remarkable considering where oil demand was last spring, with economies slowing under the weight of the pandemic.

Based on projected rising demand, the natural production decline from existing wells and decreases in drilling activity and industry investment – especially in the U.S. – the world’s oil needs could outpace production in 2022. An undersupply potentially could put upward pressure on costs, impacting consumers, manufacturers and, generally, any process that utilizes oil.

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API, Historically Black Colleges and Universities Partner on Access to Industry Standards

industry standards  workforce  jobs 

Debra Phillips

Debra Phillips
Posted February 23, 2021

American Petroleum Institute (API) recently announced the first three participants in its new higher education initiative which makes all 700+ API standards accessible, free of charge, to students at accredited Historically Black Colleges and Universities (HBCUs) and other Minority-Serving Institutions (MSIs).

Prairie View A&M University, Southern University and A&M College and Grambling University are the program’s first participants and as we mark Black History Month – celebrating diversity and the contributions of Black Americans – this news is especially timely.

API’s new program is a natural follow-on to last October’s Facebook conversation between Dr. Benjamin Chavis, National Newspaper Publishers Association president and CEO, and Mike Sommers, API President and CEO, in which they discussed career opportunities for African Americans in the natural gas and oil industry.

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Explaining Texas: Frigid Conditions Tax All Parts of Energy System

texas  natural gas  electricity  consumers 

Mark Green

Mark Green
Posted February 18, 2021

More than 4 million Texas homes and businesses have been without electricity this week as an Arctic air mass left the state coping with temperatures hovering around zero. Electricity and natural gas use spiked and rolling blackouts were ordered as energy systems experienced what the Webber Energy Group’s Joshua Rhodes called a “black swan event” that taxed all parts of those systems at the same time.

I spoke with Dustin Meyer, API vice president of Natural Gas Markets, to find out what happened in Texas, to understand the conditions that left the nation’s No. 1 energy state struggling for power and heat and what resources could help prevent this from happening again.

Bottom line points: Texas’ difficulties represent a failure of the grid across the board, with all generation technologies falling short of expectations; as in California last summer, events in Texas underscore the need for a diverse energy supply and smart planning to support the health of the U.S. power grid; natural gas, unique among energy sources in supplying needed attributes that ensure grid reliability, is and will remain a key in that diverse mix; and natural gas has carried most of the energy load in Texas this week, and without its contributions the energy picture would have been even worse. Expanded infrastructure would help make natural gas systems more resilient.

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MSR: Oil Demand Nears January 2020 Levels

monthly-stats-report  oil demand 

Dean Foreman

Dean Foreman
Posted February 18, 2021

As oil prices rallied this past week, headlines suggested that oil demand recovery is expected to pick up speed (subscription required) later this year. However, API’s latest Monthly Statistical Report, based on January data, suggests that U.S. oil markets already kicked off 2021 with a remarkable month:

Total U.S. petroleum demand returned to within 1.2% of its level from January 2020 despite the pandemic; refining and petrochemical demand for other oils – naphtha, gasoil, propane/propylene reached a record-high level (6.5 million barrels per day, mb/d) and 33.1% share of total U.S. petroleum demand; and the lowest U.S. crude oil imports for January since 1992 propelled U.S. petroleum net exports.

Consider this: For all of the economic pain and dislocation caused by the 2020 COVID-19 recession, U.S. petroleum demand returned to within a hair of its pre-COVID levels and well within the five-year range. 

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