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Energy Tomorrow Blog

Our Energy, Our Environment

Environment  Industry  Environment and Safety  hydraulic fracturing  fracking  emissions  lng exports 

Mary Leshper

Mary Schaper
Posted October 2, 2013

California Can Protect the Environment While Sharing in a Financial Bonanza 

The Globe and Mail: Hydraulic fracturing — fracking — has been used to extract oil and natural gas from shale rock for decades. But technological improvements in recent years have made the process far more efficient. It’s expanded use in states like North Dakota, Texas, Ohio, Pennsylvania and Colorado has sparked an energy revolution that is pushing the United States toward energy independence. It has also sparked major controversy over environmental concerns, nowhere more so than in California. On Sept. 20, Gov. Jerry Brown signed legislation regulating fracking. In this essay below, Colorado Gov. John Hickenlooper, like Brown an environmentally oriented Democrat, makes the case that energy development and environmental protection are not mutually exclusive.


A 21st-century oil and natural gas industry in Colorado is recognizing that more rigorous regulations translate into broader citizen acceptance. This evolution, and the joining of innovations like horizontal drilling with long-accepted practices like hydraulic fracturing, is moving America toward energy independence.

 

In the process, we are improving the quality of the air, as well as beginning to fight back against climate change. Colorado has a proud history of leadership and innovation in the deployment of clean energy technologies. We have laws in place that require utilities to produce as much as 30 percent of their electricity from renewable sources by 2020.

 

Read more: http://bit.ly/GzZbrG

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American Energy for America's Energy Future

exports  liquefied natural gas  natural gas from shale  oil and natural gas  ghg emissions  lng 

Mark Green

Mark Green
Posted October 1, 2013

Jobs, U.S. energy security and regulation are leading the discussion at the North American Gas Forum (NAGF) this week in Washington. The NAGF is a gathering of regional natural gas industry members -- primarily focused on issues that affect the distribution and use of natural gas domestically and globally. Highlights from the two-day meeting:

  • Because of vast shale reserves, the U.S. has a chance to be more secure in the future through safe, reliable supplies of North American energy.

ICF International's Kevin Petak predicted the Marcellus Shale Play will become a "juggernaut," producing more than 20 million cubic feet of natural gas per day by 2035. The U.S. Energy Information Administration's Howard Gruenspecht said U.S. natural gas production is expected to outpace domestic consumption and that the U.S. could become a net exporter by 2040.

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Study: Natural Gas Drilling Emits Less Methane Than Previously Estimated

epa  methane emissions  hydraulic fracturing 

Mark Green

Mark Green
Posted September 17, 2013

A new, comprehensive study by the University of Texas showing methane emissions from natural gas drilling are a fraction of estimates from just a few years ago vouches for industry efforts to reduce methane emissions, suggests existing regulation is working and that an additional regulatory layer isn’t needed.

The UT study, sponsored by a group of interests that includes the Environmental Defense Fund (EDF) and a number of natural gas producers, examined 150 production sites across the U.S. with 489 wells, 27 well completion flowbacks, nine well unloadings and four well workovers. 

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Our Energy Choices Point to Building the Keystone XL

Energy Security  keystone xl  emissions  canadian oil sands 

Mark Green

Mark Green
Posted September 12, 2013

For Canada, the question of whether the Keystone XL pipeline should be built can be reduced to a handful of clarity producing contrasts – as Canadian Ambassador to the U.S. Gary Doer framed for a group of reporters this week:

Does the U.S. choose oil from Venezuela or neighbor and ally Canada?

Do we transport that oil by pipeline, in an environmentally safe and cost-effective manner, or by other means?

Do we choose infrastructure construction, meaning thousands of U.S. jobs and economic stimulus, or the status quo?

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Investing in All of the Above

Environment  co2 emissions  greenhouse gas mitigation 

Mark Green

Mark Green
Posted September 10, 2013

Let the numbers sink in from a new T2 and Associates study that details the oil and natural gas industry’s investments in technologies to reduce greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions starting with $81 billion – industry’s investment in GHG mitigation technologies between 2000 and 2012.

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Grounding Energy Policy in Reality

Economy  emissions 

Mark Green

Mark Green
Posted August 27, 2013

U.S. Energy Secretary Ernest Moniz emphasized the Obama administration’s commitment to curbing CO2 emissions during an appearance at Columbia University Monday, but he also stressed that energy policies must be grounded in reality:

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Energy Today – August 27, 2013

hydraulic fracturing  emissions  jobs 

Mary Leshper

Mary Schaper
Posted August 27, 2013

The Geography of Jobs: Smart Policies Are Good, But Oil Is Better

The Atlantic: If you want to understand how to create jobs -- not just a few at a time, but hundreds of thousands at once -- look to Texas and North Dakota.

Together, these two states account for a little more than 8 percent of the country's population -- about one in 12 people. But they're also responsible for 20 percent of net new jobs since the end of the recession. And, crucially, they account for "more than 100 percent of the increase in U.S. [oil] production since 2009," James Hamilton writes.

The Great Plains have been relatively great throughout the recovery for many reasons -- cheaper land, cheap wages, service sectors insulated from the housing-finance crisis that leveled parts of California, Florida, Arizona, and Nevada -- but energy has helped a lot. 

Read more: http://bit.ly/1823p3p

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All in Favor: EPA, Energy, Interior Chiefs Say Yes to U.S. Natural Gas

emissions  economic growth 

Mark Green

Mark Green
Posted August 16, 2013

New EPA Administrator Gina McCarthy, in remarks this week in Colorado:

“Responsible development of natural gas is an important part of our work to curb climate change and support a robust clean energy market at home.”

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Energy Today – August 13, 2013

oil sands  rfs34  ethanol  emissions 

Mary Leshper

Mary Schaper
Posted August 13, 2013

Bloomberg News– Canada's Oil Sands Industry Using CO2 to Grow Algae, Reduce Emissions

In an effort to  curb carbon emissions, Canadian energy companies have started converting CO2 into products – taking carbon dioxide from processing oil sands, mixing it with wastewater and fed to algae, which then can be turned into cattle feed and other products.

Washington Times – China Will Surpass U.S. in Oil Imports

According to EIA data, China will take over the top spot from the U.S. as the world’s largest importer of crude oil by October, the newspaper reports. This shift in the global oil market – the first time the U.S. will not be the top importer or oil since the 1970s – “could transform geopolitics” as the U.S. shale surge continues.  

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Study: Keystone XL Will Have 'No Material Impact' on Emissions

climate impact  keystone xl  emissions  oil sands 

Mark Green

Mark Green
Posted August 9, 2013

IHS CERA’s new environmental assessment of the Keystone XL pipeline and pipeline-related oil sands development sends a pretty clear message to President Obama as he decides whether to approve the full project’s construction: There’s not a climate rationale for rejecting the pipeline – and along with it, tens of thousands of U.S. jobseconomic uplift and greater energy security.

While the IHS report no doubt will have little effect on pipeline opponents – less than 15 percent of Americans in this recent survey – it should get the attention of the president, who has said the Keystone XL should be built only if it would serve the national interest and not “significantly exacerbate the problem of carbon pollution.”

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