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Energy Tomorrow Blog

U.S. Energy: For Jobs, and Opportunity

american energy  jobs  Economy  virginia  ohio  louisiana  north dakota  e15 

Mary Leshper

Mary Schaper
Posted August 19, 2014

Daily Press (Newport News, Va.) Editorial: With thoughtful planning and focused leadership, Virginia could be a titan of production and one the most important states for energy on the East Coast. Our natural resources have the commonwealth poised to be a national leader in energy, and properly utilizing them could create thousands of jobs and generate billions in revenue.

It is challenging to strike a balance between traditional energy sources, such as coal, oil and natural gas, and emerging renewables like wind and biomass. The Virginia Energy Plan, updated every four years by the Department of Mines, Minerals and Energy, serves as a guide.

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Technology and Innovation Driving America’s Energy Boom

american energy  Energy Security  jobs  technology  innovation  emissions  fracking 

Mary Leshper

Mary Schaper
Posted August 18, 2014

Albuquerque Journal (Former Sen. Pete Domenici): America has been handed a great gift, the gift of technological breakthroughs like horizontal drilling and hydraulic fracturing for oils and natural gas.

This gift, if we handle it properly, has the potential not only to free our nation from being hostage to other nations, but to allow Europe and other regions to free themselves from the tyranny of dependence on Russian sources of oil and gas.

Think how much differently our allies in Europe would behave in this time of crisis if they had the infrastructure, and the access, to handle natural gas and oil from America, Canada and Mexico.

New Mexico has played an important, I would say critical, role in this potential geopolitical and economic revolution.

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Milestones for American Energy – and Potential Obstacles

american energy  epa  ozone standards  fracking  texas  keystone xl pipeline 

Mary Leshper

Mary Schaper
Posted August 14, 2014

Wall Street Journal (Jay Timmons, NAM): In a town famous for inaction, Washington is gearing up to take action on a major policy issue. But there's a hitch: The outcome could be the most expensive regulation in the nation's history, possibly tanking the economy and costing jobs at a time when businesses, manufacturers and families are making a comeback.

Later this year, the Environmental Protection Agency will decide whether it should tighten the air-quality standard for ground-level ozone. There are several things about this possible new standard that are alarming.

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The Promise of American Energy, Today and Tomorrow

american energy  global markets  fracking  Economy  jobs  keystone xl pipeline 

Mary Leshper

Mary Schaper
Posted August 13, 2014

Bloomberg Businessweek: Fighting across Iraq, Libya, Ukraine and Gaza, and an accelerating economy, should mean higher oil prices. Yet crude is falling.

Six years ago, oil soared to a record $147 a barrel as tension mounted over Iran’s nuclear program and the world economy had just seen the strongest period of sustained growth since the 1970s. Now, West Texas Intermediate, the U.S. benchmark price, has traded below $100 for 10 days and Brent, the European equivalent, tumbled to a 13-month low.

What’s changed is the shale fracking boom. The U.S. is pumping the most oil in 27 years, adding more than 3 million barrels of daily supply since 2008. The International Energy Agency said yesterday that a supply glut is shielding the market from disruptions. Bank of America Corp., Citigroup Inc. and BNP Paribas SA concur. 

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Choosing Jobs, Energy Security, American Energy

Economy  Energy Security  jobs  american energy  fracking  ohio  pennsylvania 

Mary Leshper

Mary Schaper
Posted August 11, 2014

The Daily Signal: There’s been something of an energy boom taking place in the U.S. over the past few years, and it’s given the American economy a real boost. Now we just need the federal government to get out of the way and open opportunities to freely trade energy, and those benefits will grow substantially.

U.S. coal exports over the past six years are way up, in large part because of the administration’s effort to limit consumption domestically. Domestic production of oil and natural gas is rising fast as well, with producers seeking to export their products to foreign markets.

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U.S. Energy – for Jobs, Economic Growth, Security

Energy Security  Economy  jobs  american energy  fracking  marcellus  lng exports  colorado  texas 

Mary Leshper

Mary Schaper
Posted August 8, 2014

Penn Live (Brian Hollister): I was retired at age 49. After service in the military and a career as an Electronic Quality Engineer, I was pleased to be working independently at what I enjoy most, small construction projects. I was living comfortably while doing work for friends and community members.

But then came the economic collapse of 2008, and like so many Americans, my fortune - quite literally - changed. Overnight I lost much of what I'd saved for my future and I needed to return to work. It's a familiar story. After time away, the job market I found was quite different from the one I'd left behind.

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American Energy is Changing the Global Markets

american energy  trade  global markets  exports  fracking  Economy  Energy Security 

Mary Leshper

Mary Schaper
Posted August 7, 2014

The Christian Science Monitor: WASHINGTON — An oil and gas boom helped drive the US trade deficit to a five-month low in June, according to federal data released Wednesday.

Increased domestic energy production means Americans are buying less foreign oil and gas, and selling more of it overseas. That has tamped down the trade deficit in recent years, helping along an economy that continues to recover from the Great Recession.

Some say the deficit could be slashed further if the US were to ease energy export restrictions put in place to protect US consumers from global energy shocks. But such a move would have impacts that go beyond the country’s balance of trade. Critics of oil and gas exports say they will raise energy prices at home, and increase the environmental impacts of extracting and burning fossil fuels.

Either way, a renaissance in oil and gas production is already changing the way officials, analysts, and economists look at the future of the US economy.

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Empowering, Sustaining America’s Energy Revolution

Economy  Energy Security  jobs  american energy  fracking  lng exports  colorado 

Mary Leshper

Mary Schaper
Posted August 6, 2014

The Hill (Toby Mack): America , along with its oil and gas producers, energy supply chain companies, and millions of American workers, are quite literally "missing the boat" as a result of the federal government-imposed ban on crude oil exports, and severe limits on liquefied natural gas (LNG) exports. Eliminating these restrictions would set the stage for dramatically more rapid growth in energy production and for the supply chain businesses that support energy operations.

Applications to export as much as 25 billion cubic feet per day (bcf/d) equivalent of natural gas are stuck in the Department of Energy's limbo of lengthy review processes.  Recently released studies and analysis indicate that each additional 10 bcf/d of natural gas produced to meet export demand would create 110,000 new jobs and $20 billion annually of new business for the energy supply chain - construction contractors, equipment companies, materials suppliers and production service providers. And with other nations rushing to fill the void left by the absence of U.S. exports, this window of opportunity will close and the business lost if we don't accelerate processing of these applications.

On the crude oil front, research firm IHS Energy conservatively projects that enabling exports would cause U.S. production to increase by an average of 1.2 million barrels per day by 2016, which would result in an additional $86 billion of GDP per year. With models showing about half of production-related output being created by the energy supply chain, this yields approximately $40 billion more per year in potential business for supply chain companies, with about another 200,000 new jobs.

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Energy Choices, Thanks to Our Energy Revolution

american energy  lng exports  Economy  Energy Security  jobs  fracking  technology  ethanol 

Mary Leshper

Mary Schaper
Posted August 5, 2014

Wall Street Journal (Thomas Tunstall): The unexpected increase in the production of shale oil, a light oil called condensate and natural gas in the U.S. has upended many assumptions about the U.S. energy market. As the oil and gas bonanza continues, the U.S. ban on crude-oil exports looks increasingly outdated, arbitrary and economically damaging. With Europe poised to endanger its gas supply by imposing more sanctions on its major supplier Russia, the possibility of energy exports from America takes on an important security dimension too.

Thanks to fracking and other unconventional shale-extraction technology, natural gas is the biggest energy story in the U.S. now. In the early 2000s, natural-gas pipeline companies—such as Cheniere and Freeport LNG—spent billions on import facilities as U.S. production decreased, to less than 19 trillion cubic feet in 2005 from roughly 22 trillion cubic feet in 1970.

Since 2006, however, natural-gas production in the U.S. has soared. The U.S. now produces more than 25 trillion cubic feet of natural gas a year, the most in the country's more than 100-year history of gas exploration and production. As a result, billions of dollars are now being invested to convert many of the facilities designed to receive imported gas into export facilities.

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Domestic Energy’s Broad Benefits

american energy  fracking  Economy  jobs  Environment  emissions  lng exports  keystone xl pipeline 

Mary Leshper

Mary Schaper
Posted August 4, 2014

USA Today: The U.S. energy industry is booming. As new technologies make oil easier and more affordable to extract, the United States is poised to become the world's leading oil producer as soon as 2015, according to a 2013 study by the International Energy Agency. At the same time, proven oil reserves — the estimated quantities of oil that can be extracted under existing conditions — have also risen. In 2012, the U.S. had more than 30.5 billion barrels of proven oil reserves, up 15% from the year before.

Ten states accounted for nearly 80% of the U.S. proven oil reserves as of the end of 2012. Texas was the state with the most proven reserves, totaling more than 9.6 billion barrels of oil, or close to a third of all U.S. reserves. Based on the U.S. Energy Information Agency (EIA) data on proved oil reserves, these are the most oil-rich states in the country.

Unsurprisingly, the states with the highest totals of proven reserves are also among the states producing most oil. Of the 10 most oil-rich states, all but one were also among the states with the most production activity as of 2013. Together, these 10 states accounted for more than 2 billion of the 2.7 billion barrels of oil produced last year. Offshore drilling, not attributable to any state, accounted for much of the production not coming from these states.

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