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Energy Tomorrow Blog

American Oil, American Jobs

keystone xl pipeline  american energy  Economy  jobs  Energy Security  canadian oil sands  emissions 

Mark Green

Mark Green
Posted February 27, 2015

President Obama, in an interview with a North Dakota television station, explaining why he continues to delay the Keystone XL pipeline:

“Part of the reason North Dakota has done so well is because we've very much been promoting domestic U.S. energy use. I've already said I'm happy to look at increasing pipeline production for U.S. oil. But Keystone is for Canadian oil. Sending it down to the Gulf. It bypasses the U.S., it estimated to create 250, maybe, 300 permanent jobs. We should be focusing on American infrastructure for American jobs for American producers, and that's something we very much support.”

In the span of just six sentences, the president contradicts expert analysis of Keystone XL’s jobs and market impacts at least four times – about once for each breath.

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The Wide-Ranging Benefits of American Energy

american energy  Economy  Energy Security  Environment  jobs  new york  pennsylvania  fracking  alaska  arctic 

Mary Leshper

Mary Schaper
Posted February 20, 2015

EIA Today in Energy: Working natural gas in storage has surpassed five-year average levels for the first time in more than a year. At 2,157 billion cubic feet (Bcf) as of February 13, stocks are 58 Bcf greater than the five-year average. Recent extremely cold weather may result in high stock withdrawals for the week ending February 20, which could again push stocks below their five-year average. However, natural gas production in February and March that is forecast to average 5 Bcf/day above the year-ago level is likely to contribute to healthy inventories and moderate prices as the nation moves from winter into spring.

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Offshore Energy and South Carolina

offshore development  offshore drilling  south carolina  Energy Security  Economy  jobs  Offshore Production  Environment 

Mark Green

Mark Green
Posted February 20, 2015

Federal officials continue to hold public hearings on a draft offshore oil and natural gas leasing program that, when finalized, would largely determine where offshore energy development can occur from 2017 to 2022. Given the lead times needed for offshore development, the federal leasing program is vitally important to America’s energy production and energy security. Safe offshore development benefits the country but especially states that would host operations in their coastal waters. We’ve looked at how offshore oil and natural gas development would benefit Virginia and North Carolina – in terms of jobs and revenues generated for state budgets. Today, South Carolina.

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Offshore Energy and Florida

offshore drilling  offshore development  florida  florida offshore drilling  Economy  jobs  Energy Security 

Mark Green

Mark Green
Posted February 19, 2015

Like other states along the Atlantic coast, Florida could see substantial economic benefits from safe offshore oil and natural gas development – if Washington will allow it. That’s a big “if.” A draft oil and natural gas leasing program – the subject of a scheduled public hearing today in Jacksonville – provides for just one lease sale in the Atlantic and not until 2021, almost at the end of a plan that covers the 2017 to 2022 time period. That could leave Florida and other states on the outside looking in at the benefits of offshore development.

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Economic Growth, Thanks to American Energy

Economy  Energy Security  american energy  fracking  ohio  colorado  arctic 

Mary Leshper

Mary Schaper
Posted February 18, 2015

NPR: Drilling companies in Pennsylvania have broken yet another record, as shale gas production jumped 30 percent last year, according to new data released by the state Department of Environmental Protection. Marcellus Shale drillers produced more than 2 trillion cubic feet of gas in the second half of 2014. Throughout all of last year, they produced 4 trillion cubic feet– or about 16 percent of what the entire United States consumes on an annual basis.

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Crude Imports Falling, Thanks to Domestic Output

imports  crude oil  ethanol  Energy Security  renewable fuel standard  american energy  Economy 

Mark Green

Mark Green
Posted February 18, 2015

Falling crude oil imports is a good-news story for the United States – indicative of greater U.S. energy self-sufficiency, resulting in less dependency on others and increased American energy security in the world. According to the U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA), net imports of crude fell by more than 2.7 million barrels per day (bbl/d) from 2008 to 2014:

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Good Energy Policies and American Prosperity

american energy  Economy  Energy Security  growth  ethanol  fracking  lng exports 

Mary Leshper

Mary Schaper
Posted January 28, 2015

The Guardian (Debbie Carlson): Ethanol was supposed to do a lot for the US. It was supposed to help reduce our dependence on foreign oil. It was supposed to combat climate change. It was supposed to be a gateway for more renewable fuels technology. It was supposed to reduce gasoline prices because it was cheaper. So when Congress mandated in 2005 that 10% of the nation’s fuel supply had to be blended with ethanol, which is derived from corn, there were some idealistic hopes that renewable fuels would wean us off fossil fuels. It hasn’t worked that way.

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American Energy Benefits You and Me

american energy  Economy  jobs  fracking  keystone xl pipeline  Energy Security  lng exports 

Mary Leshper

Mary Schaper
Posted January 27, 2015

TribLIVE: Specialized, experienced engineers are becoming a tough get in Western Pennsylvania as the gas drilling industry outpaces the growth of an experienced talent pool. Stock awards, sign-on bonuses, unlimited vacation and travel stipends are increasingly becoming necessary for companies looking to attract top candidates, recruiters say. “Sometimes, we get so lost in it, they have so much they're trying to offer and entice them with,” said Frank Civitate, founder and president of Synergy Staffing, based in Pittsburgh. “The fact of the matter is everyone is looking for the same types of folks.”

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American Energy: Disrupting the Global Energy Market

Economy  global markets  Energy Security  fracking  alaska  anwr  revenue 

Mary Leshper

Mary Schaper
Posted January 26, 2015

The New York Times (Daniel Yergin): A historic change of roles is at the heart of the clamor and turmoil over the collapse of oil prices, which have plummeted by 50 percent since September. For decades, Saudi Arabia, backed by the Persian Gulf emirates, was described as the “swing producer.” With its immense production capacity, it could raise or lower its output to help the global market adjust to shortages or surpluses. But on Nov. 27, at the OPEC meeting in Vienna, Saudi Arabia effectively resigned from that role and OPEC handed over all responsibility for oil prices to the market, which the Saudi oil minister, Ali Al-Naimi, predicted would “stabilize itself eventually.” OPEC’s decision was hardly unanimous. Venezuela and Iran, their economies in deep trouble, lobbied hard for production cutbacks, to no avail. Afterward, Iran accused Saudi Arabia of waging an “oil war” and being part of a “plot” against it.

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Sound Policy for a Sound Energy Future

Energy Security  Economy  jobs  Policies  keystone xl  alaska  fracking 

Mary Leshper

Mary Schaper
Posted January 23, 2015

Forbes (Loren Steffy): President Obama didn’t say much about energy in his State of the Union speech Tuesday. Last year, he focused on energy issues more, and devoted much of the energy portions of his speech to natural gas. This year, he acknowledged rising U.S. oil production and the benefits of cheap energy that have come with it, and then he made a backhanded reference to the Keystone XL pipeline. In calling on both parties to support the infrastructure projects such as “modern ports, strong bridges, faster trains and faster internet,” he then encouraged lawmakers to pass a bipartisan infrastructure plan by saying: “So let’s set our sights higher than a single oil pipeline.” Certainly, the Keystone pipeline has become a far greater political punching bag than a meaningful piece of infrastructure. Environmentalists have greatly exaggerated its role in climate change, and Republicans in Congress are now determined to push through legislation supporting it almost out of spite for the administration’s foot-dragging on a decision.

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