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Energy Tomorrow Blog

Keystone XL to Natural Gas: American Energy is Changing the Global Market

american energy  Energy Security  Economy  jobs  fracking  keystone xl pipeline  global markets 

Mary Leshper

Mary Schaper
Posted March 19, 2014

Carpe Diem Blog: US petroleum exports reached a new record high in 2013 at an average of more than 3.5 million barrels per day (bpd), which was almost double the 1.8 million bpd of petroleum exports in 2008. During his State of the Union address in January of 2010, President Obama promised that his administration would double US exports within five years. It’s becoming increasingly clear that it’s a completely unachievable goal, except for a few exceptions like petroleum products. But I don’t think we’ll be hearing about the doubling of petroleum exports from Team Obama. Fossil fuel based exports were probably the furthest thing from his mind when Obama made the fantasy promise to double America’s exports within five years.

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Happy Birthday, Fracking!

fracking  american energy  Economy  Environment  Energy Security  Energy Efficiency  jobs  hydraulic fracturing  innovation  technology 

Mark Green

Mark Green
Posted March 17, 2014

Happy birthday, fracking! What a fantastic, 65-year ride it has been – and here’s to another 65 years and more.

Advanced hydraulic fracturing and horizontal drilling launched an oil and natural gas renaissance in this country – bringing dynamic job creation, economic stimulus that radiates well beyond the oil and natural gas industry proper and greater energy security. Thanks to fracking, the United States is an energy superpower that, with the right policies, can harness its vast resources to ensure a significantly better future for its citizens while reducing energy-related tension across the globe.

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Efficient and Abundant: American Energy Hits New Highs

american energy  Energy Efficiency  Energy Security  business  fracking  keystone xl pipeline 

Mary Leshper

Mary Schaper
Posted March 11, 2014

Liquefied Natural Gas as a Geopolitical Tool

Denver Post Editorial: Speeding up U.S. natural gas exports was a good idea even before the crisis in Crimea, but it's an even better idea now.

It's not as if U.S. exports are going to undermine Vladimir Putin's imperialistic designs in the short term. Ukraine would love to be less dependent on Russia for natural gas, but the export infrastructure in the U.S. for liquefied natural gas (LNG), particularly in terms of ports, isn't ready.

Indeed, the earliest that an export terminal is expected to come on line is in late 2015, with other terminals becoming operational perhaps a couple of years later. For that matter, the government doesn't direct where exports go. If the price in Asia for LNG is higher than in Europe, U.S. exports will tend to wind up there.

Still, the more gas is available worldwide, the less leverage Putin will have in bullying neighbors and in talks with European powers such as Germany, which also depends on Russian gas.

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The Importance of America’s Shale Energy Boom

american energy  fracking  Energy Security  global energy 

Mary Leshper

Mary Schaper
Posted March 10, 2014

Fracking Uses Lots of Water? Hardly

Real Clear Energy: For some reason, hydraulic fracking has gotten a reputation for using a lot of water. Not so, says Economic Policies for the 21st Century at the Manhattan Institute. When you look at the actual amount of water used in the process, hydraulic fracking comes out at the bottom of the list. As the report observes, "It takes twice as much water to maintain a golf course for a month than to frack a natural gas well."

 

Don't forget, all other energy resources use a lot of water, too. Biofuels is the biggest offender, since huge amounts of water are required to process and dilute the organic material. When the irrigation water needed to grow the crops is included, biofuels consume in excess of 2500 gallons of water per million BTU. (That may be cheating a bit since some advanced biofuel crops may not require irrigation, but the current corn crop, the source of all our ethanol, is heavily irrigated.) All forms of oil drilling require lots of water since water usually has to be added once a well passes maturity.

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Jobs and Opportunity in Energy

job creation  oil and natural gas jobs  oil and gas industry  american energy  petroleum products 

Mark Green

Mark Green
Posted March 10, 2014

A new report on the employment outlook for minorities and women in the oil and natural gas and petrochemical industries can be summed up in two words: tremendous opportunity. The study by consulting firm IHS projects that minorities will fill one-third of jobs in these industries by 2030 – up from one-quarter in 2010.

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America’s Energy Reality: Surging Domestic Output Drives U.S. Toward Self-Sufficiency

american energy  fracking  exports  lng  texas  policy 

Mary Leshper

Mary Schaper
Posted February 28, 2014

U.S. Will Meet Energy Needs by 2020, Citi Researcher Says

Forbes: By the end of this decade, the United States will produce all the energy it needs, the head of commodities research for Citigroup said in Chicago Thursday.

Edward L. Morse, managing director and global head of commodities for Citi, said the gas and oil boom will combine with improved efficiency to make the U.S. a net-zero importer of energy by 2020.

“I think that the chances are close to 100 percent that the U.S. will be supplying 100 percent of its energy requirements for power generation and transportation,” Morse told about 100 people at a Fairmont Hotel gathering sponsored by The Chicago Council on Global Affairs.

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Innovations are Fueling American Energy, Growth in Manufacturing

innovation  manufacturing  jobs  Economy  fracking  american energy  global energy 

Mary Leshper

Mary Schaper
Posted February 25, 2014

American Shale Gas and Tight Oil: Reshaping the Global Energy Balance

IHS Unconventional Energy Blog: The development of shale gas and tight oil in the United States constitutes an “unconventional revolution,” owing to its scale and speed. It is already having a profound global impact: upending energy markets, reshaping competitiveness in the world economy, and portending major shifts in global politics.

The unconventional revolution was born out of advances in two technologies. Hydraulic fracturing — or “fracking” — was introduced at the end of the 1940s. Efforts to apply this technique to dense shale in Texas began in the early 1980s. But it took two decades to perfect the combination of fracking and horizontal drilling that would drive the new boom. And it wasn’t until 2008 that these techniques began to have a major impact.

Since then, however, growth has been remarkable. Shale gas currently accounts for nearly half of U.S. natural gas production, and U.S. prices have fallen to one third of European levels and one-fifth of Asian levels. Tight oil, produced with the same techniques as shale gas, has led to a 60 percent rise in U.S. oil production since 2008. This increase of three million barrels per day is larger than the national output of nine of the 13 OPEC countries. The International Energy Agency predicts that the U.S. will soon overtake Saudi Arabia and Russia as the world’s largest oil producer.

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The Broad Benefits of Surging U.S. Energy

american energy  Economy  jobs  Energy Security  Environment  global markets  lng exports  keystone xl pipeline 

Mary Leshper

Mary Schaper
Posted February 21, 2014

Well-Being in America: Shale Gas Buys You Happiness

The Economist: Based on interviews with more than 178,000 people from all 50 states, the Well-Being Index offers an interesting glimpse of the physical and mental health of the nation. It also spotlights the country's winners and losers. The results divide regionally, with Midwestern and Western states earning nine of the ten best scores in 2013, while Southern states have eight of the ten lowest. Massachusetts has the highest rate of residents with health insurance (which may bode well for Obamacare). Colorado, meanwhile, nearly always has the lowest obesity rate. 

Sitting pretty in first place now is North Dakota, which has displaced Hawaii as the state where people are most likely to be healthy and feel good about their life and work. North Dakota’s speedy climb to first place from 19 last year seems to have a lot to do with the shale-gas boom, which has buoyed the state with lots of new jobs and money. This bonanza has apparently trickled into South Dakota, which has elbowed aside Colorado to secure second place.

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America’s Spectacular Shale Surge

american energy  Economy  jobs  Environment  Energy Security  revenue  fracking 

Mary Leshper

Mary Schaper
Posted February 20, 2014

Welcome to ‘Saudi Texas’

U.S. News & World Report (Laskoski): To fully appreciate what many of us may simply take for granted — that the Lone Star state produces oil as easily as McDonald’s produces hamburgers — it sometimes helps to look elsewhere to appreciate the actual scale by which we should view such things. 

The Associated Press reported this month that North Dakota produced 313 million barrels of oil in 2013, a record amount, and about 70 million more than it produced in 2012. For North Dakota, that’s six consecutive years of record oil production. State data shows that the 185 oil rigs working there now double the amount from four years ago. And you’ve certainly heard about the economic boom and jobs growth that has drawn thousands from all across the country seeking their fortune. 

But when your attention is drawn to the Texas oil boom, that discussion takes place on another plane because of the previously inaccessible shale wealth that transforms state economies via fracking. Jonathan Cogan of the Energy Information Administration noted this week that production in the Eagle Ford formation in South Texas reached 1.2 million barrels per day in December. Additionally, production from the Permian Basin averaged 1.3 million bpd and is projected to grow more than any other U.S. region through 2015.

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America’s Energy Edge – U.S. Energy Promises New Opportunities

american energy  fracking  keystone xl pipeline  Economy  jobs  Environment  Energy Security  ethanol  regulation 

Mary Leshper

Mary Schaper
Posted February 19, 2014

The Geopolitical Consequences of the Shale Revolution 

Foreign Affairs (Blackwell and O’Sullivan): Only five years ago, the world’s supply of oil appeared to be peaking, and as conventional gas production declined in the United States, it seemed that the country would become dependent on costly natural gas imports. But in the years since, those predictions have proved spectacularly wrong. Global energy production has begun to shift away from traditional suppliers in Eurasia and the Middle East, as producers tap unconventional gas and oil resources around the world, from the waters of Australia, Brazil, Africa, and the Mediterranean to the oil sands of Alberta. The greatest revolution, however, has taken place in the United States, where producers have taken advantage of two newly viable technologies to unlock resources once deemed commercially infeasible: horizontal drilling, which allows wells to penetrate bands of shale deep underground, and hydraulic fracturing, or fracking, which uses the injection of high-pressure fluid to release gas and oil from rock formations. 

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