Skip to main content

Energy Tomorrow Blog

America’s Energy Future: Good Policy, Economic Growth, Consumer Benefits

Oil and Gas  security  production  us energy  Economy 

Kate Wallace

Kate Lowery
Posted August 24, 2016

The United States is a global energy leader, thanks largely to technological advances in hydraulic fracturing and horizontal drilling. America’s energy leadership has proven successful in reducing greenhouse gas emissions, strengthening national security and keeping prices low for consumers. 

More »

The States and the Right Regulatory Approach

carbon emissions  Economy  energy regulations  greenhouse gas emissions  ohio  oil and natural gas  Safety  shale energy  texas 

Mark Green

Mark Green
Posted July 12, 2016

The sound approach to energy regulation in the U.S. – one that provides appropriate oversight to oil and natural gas development without unnecessarily impeding progress – continues to be a major theme at the U.S. Energy Information Administration’s (EIA) annual conference in Washington.

Tesoro President and CEO Gregory J. Goff raised the point with his Day 1 keynote speech, calling for transparency, fairness and accountability in federal regulation:

“Consumers, companies and the economy all benefit when government policies are well-reasoned and balanced. America is blessed with an abundance of affordable, reliable energy. It must not be squandered. Allowing the forces of the free market to operate will continue to benefit society. Government should be a facilitating partner in this positive economic force, not a roadblock to it.”

More »

Strong Public Support for New England Infrastructure

affordable energy  connecticut  massachusetts  rhode island  new hampshire  maine  vermont  Jobs and Economy 

Sabrina Fang

Sabrina Fang
Posted June 1, 2016

To create jobs, continue progress in reducing emissions and ensure America’s homes and manufacturers have access to affordable energy, energy infrastructure should be a top priority. Private businesses are ready to invest and workers are ready to build, now politicians need to get out of the way.

More »

Lucky and Good – The U.S. Energy From Shale Revolution

shale energy  Jobs and Economy  carbon emissions 

Reid Porter

Reid Porter
Posted May 31, 2016

Politico has an interview out today with Iain Conn, chief executive of the British energy and services company Centrica. Let’s look at a couple of the points that he makes.

More »

Tillerson: Foundations for Continued Energy Progress

Economy  exxonmobil  exxon  emissions 

Mark Green

Mark Green
Posted May 6, 2016

Energy for the betterment of all. Sounds simple enough, yet the foundational role energy plays in creating opportunity for better, healthier lives, security and freedom must not be taken for granted.

America’s energy revolution is driving economic growth. It’s benefiting individuals and families with reliable, lower-cost fuels. It’s building national security and strengthening the United States’ stature in the world. Our energy renaissance also is at the heart of lowering carbon emissions to near 20-year lows, which is letting the U.S. lead the word in CO2 emissions reductions. No, we mustn’t take that for granted.

ExxonMobil Chairman and CEO Rex W. Tillerson touched on these points during a speech this week at the U.S. Energy Association’s annual meeting and policy forum, which honored him with its 2016 annual award. Tillerson underscored the need for policies and actions to sustain and grow the U.S. energy revolution, for creating broader access in the world to energy’s benefits and noted the energy sector’s leadership in advancing climate goals.

More »

Oil Exports and the Federal Budget

crude oil exports  spr  government revenues  Economy  jobs  eia  taxes 

Mark Green

Mark Green
Posted October 27, 2015

Reports by Bloomberg and others say that White House and congressional budget negotiators would sell oil from the Strategic Petroleum Reserve (SPR) to partially pay for their new budget agreement. Sales would total 58 million barrels from 2018 to 2025, according to a draft House bill (see Section 403-a).

How much money would be raised from the sales would depend on prices at the time of the sales. But, if the goal is generating revenue for government to fund worthy projects, rather than a series of one-time sales, why not lift the ban on U.S. crude oil exports and create an annual revenue stream?

According to a study by ICF International (Page 86), ending the 1970s-era oil exports ban would lift the U.S. economy, create jobs – and generate significant additional revenue for government. A number of other studies mirror ICF’s findings on the economic benefits from lifting the export ban. We highlight ICF here because its estimate of additional oil production from lifting the ban (up 500,000 barrels per day) is almost identical to the output increase estimated by the U.S. Energy Information Administration (470,000 barrels per day). ICF:

Federal, state, and local governments benefit from crude oil exports both in terms of the generation of GDP, which is then taxed at these levels, but also through royalties on federal lands where drilling takes place. Total government revenues, including U.S. federal, state, and local tax receipts attributable to GDP increases from expanding crude oil exports, could increase up to $13.5 billion in 2020.

More »

Energizing Nevada

analysis  nevada  Economy  ozone standards 

Reid Porter

Reid Porter
Posted September 2, 2015

Our series highlighting the economic and jobs impact of energy in each of the 50 states continues today with Nevada. We started the series with Virginia on June 29 and began this week with a review of Louisiana and Rhode Island. All information covered in this series can be found online here, arranged on an interactive map of the United States. State-specific information across the country will be populated on this map as the series continues.

As we can see with Nevada, the energy impacts of the states individually combine to form energy’s national economic and jobs picture: 9.8 million jobs supported and $1.2 trillion in value added.

More »

Energizing Wyoming

analysis  wyoming  crude oil exports  economy and energy  gasoline prices  income  lng  pricewaterhousecoopers  trade  wood mackenzie 

Reid Porter

Reid Porter
Posted August 28, 2015

Our series highlighting the economic and jobs impact of energy in each of the 50 states continues today with Wyoming. We started the series with Virginia and Colorado earlier this summer and reviewed Kentucky, Tennessee , Utah and Georgia to begin this week. All information covered in this series can be found online here, arranged on an interactive map of the United States. State-specific information across the country will be populated on this map as the series continues.

As we can see with Wyoming, the energy impacts of the states individually combine to form energy’s national economic and jobs picture: 9.8 million jobs supported and $1.2 trillion in value added.

More »

Energizing Georgia

analysis  georgia  biofuels  economy and energy  epa  greenhouse gas emission reduction  income  ozone regulations  pricewaterhousecoopers  wood mackenzie 

Reid Porter

Reid Porter
Posted August 27, 2015

Our series highlighting the economic and jobs impact of energy in each of the 50 states continues today with Georgia. We started the series with Virginia on June 29 and began this week with a review of Kentucky, Tennessee and Utah. All information covered in this series can be found online here, arranged on an interactive map of the United States. State-specific information across the country will be populated on this map as the series continues.

As we can see with Georgia, the energy impacts of the states individually combine to form energy’s national economic and jobs picture: 9.8 million jobs supported and $1.2 trillion in value added.

More »

Energizing Utah

analysis  utah  crude oil exports  economy and energy  gasoline prices  income  lng  pricewaterhousecoopers  trade  wood mackenzie 

Reid Porter

Reid Porter
Posted August 26, 2015

Our series highlighting the economic and jobs impact of energy in each of the 50 states continues today with Utah. We started the series with Virginia and Colorado earlier this summer and reviewed Kentucky and Tennessee to begin this week. All information covered in this series can be found online here, arranged on an interactive map of the United States. State-specific information across the country will be populated on this map as the series continues.

As we can see with Utah, the energy impacts of the states individually combine to form energy’s national economic and jobs picture: 9.8 million jobs supported and $1.2 trillion in value added.

More »