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Energy Tomorrow Blog

Video: Advanced Technology Drives U.S. Refining

refineries  refining capacity  refining crude oil  fuels  american energy 

Mark Green

Mark Green
Posted January 31, 2017

One of the most technologically advanced industries in the world, the U.S. refining sector is the essential link between America’s crude oil wealth and the fuels and countless consumer products we depend on every day.

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U.S. Refining – Leading the World

refinieries  refining crude oil  fuels  american energy 

Mark Green

Mark Green
Posted January 24, 2017

Amid the volume of good news emanating from America’s energy renaissancelower consumer costs, economic growth, increased energy security, environmental progress and more – let’s also recognize that these benefits wouldn’t be realized without the key contributions of the U.S. refining sector.

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SOAE 2017: An Energy Vision for Today and Tomorrow

american energy  oil and natural gas  american petroleum institute  us energy security 

Mark Green

Mark Green
Posted January 4, 2017

The Twitter-sphere did a good job reflecting many of the key messages from API’s annual State of American Energy event in Washington: economic growth, jobs, collaboration, solution-finding and bipartisanship.

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State of American Energy 2017

state of american energy  api  oil and natural gas  us energy security  energy 

Mark Green

Mark Green
Posted January 3, 2017

American Petroleum Institute President and CEO Jack Gerard will kick off the year’s energy policy conversation by outlining a number of top energy priorities during a speech Wednesday at API’s 2017 State of American Energy event. 

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Vote For Renewables, Too - Vote4Energy

vote4energy  alternative energy  american energy  renewable alternatives  research and development  everything  social-license-to-operate 

Kate Wallace

Kate Wallace
Posted August 18, 2016

The oil and natural gas industry’s continuous quest for new technologies and innovations – ensuring energy supplies that are affordable, reliable and better for the environment – makes support for renewable energy projects across the U.S. and around the world a good fit within an all-of-the-above energy strategy. 

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Two Energy Visions

us energy  oil and natural gas production  economic growth  american energy security  emission reductions  president obama 

Mark Green

Mark Green
Posted February 8, 2016

It has been clear for months that the Obama administration has lost interest in a true “all-of-the-above” approach to the nation’s energy – one that is being led by surging oil and natural gas production right here at home. Consider:

Despite multiple State Department reviews filled with science showing that rejection of the Keystone XL pipeline would result in higher emissions, the president killed the project and the 42,000 jobs it would support during its construction phase. Despite the fact U.S. carbon dioxide emissions are near 20-year lows, the administration is pushing ahead with its Clean Power Plan that favors only certain kinds of renewable energy instead of letting states to freely choose lower-emissions sources while ensuring affordable and reliable energy for consumersAlthough methane emissions from natural gas production are dropping, EPA and the Bureau of Land Management are moving forward with additional layers of regulation that could raise the cost of natural gas production and chill investments needed to bring cleaner-burning gas to market. Despite bipartisan agreement that the Renewable Fuel Standard is a failure – that mandates for increasing ethanol use actually increases greenhouse gas emissions – EPA continues to push for more ethanol in the nation’s fuel supply.

The administration’s latest anti-energy revolution proposal is an ill-conceived plan to slap a $10-per-barrel fee or tax on crude oil that could increase the cost of a barrel of crude by 30 percent and add 25 cents to the price of a gallon of gasoline.

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U.S. Energy Revolution Missing in State of the Union

american energy  president obama  state of the union  oil and natural gas production  emission reductions  economic growth 

Jack Gerard

Jack Gerard
Posted January 21, 2016

It’s become a State of the Union tradition: President Obama touts the benefits of oil and natural gas production without identifying the American energy revolution as their source. This year, the president implied that government investments in wind and solar are the reason the United States has “cut our imports of foreign oil by nearly 60 percent, and cut carbon pollution more than any other country on Earth.”

“Gas under two bucks a gallon ain’t bad, either,” he continued.

The New York Times was quick with a rebuttal, writing: “Private oil and gas companies, however, were a driving force behind the most important changes in the United States’ energy landscape over the past seven years: lower fossil fuel emissions and a reduction in dependence on imported oil. … A glut of domestic oil has helped lower prices and imports. The new supply of domestic natural gas has helped lower greenhouse gas emissions. Electric utilities have traditionally relied on coal as the cheapest fuel source, but turned to natural gas as it became cheaper.”

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Natural Gas for Energy, Economy and the Environment

state of the union  american energy  president obama  oil and natural gas development  environmental impact  economic growth 

Mark Green

Mark Green
Posted January 12, 2016

During his last State of the Union address, President Obama could declare victory – an energy victory that has seen surging domestic production, lower consumer costs, economic growth and environmental progress, all happening together, on his watch. The president can say this U.S. model is winning the day, because it is. He should say this model is exportable to the world, because it is.

Fact: The U.S. is the world’s No. 1 producer of oil and natural gas. The domestic revolution in the production of oil and gas has reduced net oil imports and positioned the U.S. to claim its place as a major player in global energy markets. At the same time, the U.S. is leading the world in reducing greenhouse gas emissions.

Fact: Affordable natural gas – the average price at the national benchmark Henry Hub in 2015 was the lowest since 1999 – is largely the reason wholesale electricity prices at major trading hubs (on a monthly average for on-peak hours) were down 27 percent to 37 percent across the U.S. last year compared to 2014. That’s a real benefit for consumers.

Fact: Natural gas is winning in the marketplace. This is reflected in data from the U.S. Energy Information Administration showing the change in annual U.S. energy consumption by fuel source over the past decade.

These are all characteristics of the U.S. model, a market-driven model for energy growth, consumer benefits and climate progress. The president can own it. We wouldn’t mind a bit.

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Voters Nationwide Support Pro-Energy Policies

state of american energy  poll  energy policy  economic security  ethanol  jobs  Offshore Production  infrastructure  crude oil exports 

Jack Gerard

Jack Gerard
Posted January 7, 2016

At this year’s State of American Energy event, we highlighted the impact of energy policy on the lives and livelihoods of families and businesses in every state. The connection between policy and pocketbooks is evident after a year in which Americans saved an average $550 per driver on gasoline, due largely to strong U.S. oil and natural gas production. But to maintain the economic and security benefits of America’s 21st century energy renaissance, we’ll need to make smart policy choices that increase access to energy resources, encourage infrastructure development, rein in misguided ethanol policy and curb costly, duplicative regulations.

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Roadblocks to Progress

state of american energy  oil and natural gas development  economic growth  renewable fuel standard  regulation  infrastructure 

Mark Green

Mark Green
Posted January 6, 2016

State of American Energy Report 2016

During this week’s State of American Energy event API President and CEO Jack Gerard described the economic and energy security gains generated by the U.S. energy revolution and the policies needed to create opportunities for the oil and natural gas industry to continue them.

Today let’s focus on some of the things Gerard identified as potential impediments to American energy. These include ideological opposition to progress, anti-consumer initiatives like the Renewable Fuel Standard (RFS), anti-market programs like the administration’s Clean Power Plan, government red tape and regulatory overreach.

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