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Energy Tomorrow Blog

Exporting U.S. Natural Gas is as Clean as You Think

exports  china  natural gas 

Kyle Isakower

Kyle Isakower
Posted June 11, 2014

Having read the U.S. National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL) report, “Life Cycle Greenhouse Gas Perspective on Exporting Liquefied Natural Gas from the United States,” published on May 29, 2014, we are puzzled by the skewed conclusions reached by the Washington Post

That U.S. exports of LNG to China could end up being worse from a greenhouse gas perspective than if China simply built a new power plant and burned its own coal supplies.”; and that “the benefits of cleaner, more efficient combustion of natural gas are largely offset by methane leakage in U.S. production and pipelines and by methane leaks and energy used in the process of liquefying and transporting the LNG.”

A correct reading of the report reaches a completely different conclusion. After accounting for all the methane leakage factors mentioned by the Post, the NETL study clearly demonstrates that life cycle GHG emissions from LNG exports from the U.S. are significantly less than emissions from coal generated electricity in China and in Europe. 

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Protecting U.S. Economic Interests

alternative energy  china  domestic energy  renewable energy  alternative energy technologies  business roundtable  edward markey  trade 

Jane Van Ryan

Jane Van Ryan
Posted November 8, 2010

An international coalition of business groups has asked the Group of 20 leaders to reach consensus encouraging the global trade of rare earth minerals. The minerals are used in cell phones, cars, alternative energy technologies, as well as in military hardware including smart bombs and sonar. (The New York Times) 

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China Invests in U.S. Oil and Gas

chesapeake energy corporation  china  de facto moratorium  domestic energy  drilling permits  energy  gulf of mexico  horizontal drilling  oil imports  texas 

Jane Van Ryan

Jane Van Ryan
Posted October 18, 2010

China has overtaken the United States as the world's largest energy consumer, according to the International Energy Agency (IEA). The executive director of the IEA Nobuo Tanaka said last week, "Probably half of the oil demand increase comes from China." (Reuters) 

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