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Energy Tomorrow Blog

Energy in 2014 and Beyond

energy supply and demand  access  trade  electricity  oil and natural gas development 

Mark Green

Mark Green
Posted December 13, 2013

There’s much to mine from ExxonMobil’s 2014 energy outlook, but here’s a quick analysis: In a world of increasing energy demand, the future looks brightest for countries that have significant energy reserves, modern industries that can find and produce from those reserves and policies that allow them to be major players in the global marketplace. For the United States that would be check, check and … check back later.

ExxonMobil’s William Colton and Kenneth Cohen highlighted the annual report that looks to global energy demand and supply out to the year 2040. Key projections and charts:

Demand – The world’s energy demand is expected to increase 35 percent over 2010 levels by 2040. Most of the demand growth will come from the developing world. ExxonMobil projects flat demand growth in developed nations despite expanding economies due to technology and energy-use efficiencies.

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World Energy Outlook

energy development  energy demand  iea  domestic energy development  access  oil production 

Mark Green

Mark Green
Posted December 3, 2013

International Energy Agency (IEA) Chief Economist Fatih Birol was at CSIS this week, highlighting the organization’s findings in its 2013 World Energy Outlook. The report focuses on global energy demand growth, the future energy mix and the sources of energy. Key takeaways from Birol’s presentation:

  • The United States could become the world’s leading oil producer as early as 2015, two years earlier than IEA projected a year ago, Birol said.
  • About two-thirds of the growth in global energy demand between now and 2035 will come from Asia.
  • U.S. energy production, especially surging natural gas output from shale via hydraulic fracturing, is creating energy cost differentials that make American products more competitive in the global market.

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Crude Oil Demand, Gasoline Prices and Greater Energy Self-Sufficiency

supply  prices  gasoline  energy  demand  crude oil  access 

Mark Green

Mark Green
Posted February 22, 2013

Gasoline prices have been climbing. The U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) reports:

The average U.S. retail price for regular motor gasoline has risen 45 cents per gallon since the start of the year, reaching $3.75 per gallon on February 18. Between January 1 and February 19, the price of Brent crude, the waterborne light sweet crude grade that drives the wholesale price of gasoline sold in most U.S. regions, rose about $6 per barrel, or about 15 cents per gallon.

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ExxonMobil Outlook: Matching Energy Supplies With Rising Global Demand

oil sands  hydraulic fracturing  energy policy  energy demand  access  natural gas 

Mark Green

Mark Green
Posted December 11, 2012

ExxonMobil has released its annual long-term energy outlook, projecting global energy needs and supplies out to 2040. Some highlights:

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The New York Times is Wrong – Again, and Again, and Again

access  anwr  demand  domestic energy  energy policy  federal lands  gulf of mexico  keystone xl  liquid fuel  offshore drilling  onshore drilling  supply  taxes 

Kyle Isakower

Kyle Isakower
Posted August 27, 2012

Ridiculing a New York Times editorial blog is like shooting unusually large fish in a barrel, but this one from last Friday is so fantastical and extreme that a commitment to an honest debate on energy compels me to fire away.  And we don’t have to go far to start the fact check, as they lead with:

"The simple truth, as President Obama has recognized, is that a country that holds less than 3 percent of the world’s reserves but consumes more than 20 percent of the world’s supply cannot drill its way to energy independence."

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