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Energy Tomorrow Blog

The Pipeline Solution to High New England Energy Costs

natural gas  pipelines  infrastructure  electricity  new hampshire  maine  vermont  rhode island  connecticut  massachusetts 

Mark Green

Mark Green
Posted March 15, 2017

The solution is more natural gas pipeline capacity, by building new lines or by expanding existing ones. New England policymakers should foster infrastructure by considering fair and appropriate financing mechanisms to help pay for new projects and by working to build community support for safe and responsible project development. This is the sensible path to keep New England’s consumers from paying more than is necessary for their energy.

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Winter and the Northeast’s Infrastructure Needs

consumers  energy costs  infrastructure  natural gas pipelines 

Michael Tadeo

Michael Tadeo
Posted October 28, 2016

Earlier this month the U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) issued its winter fuels outlook in which it said most U.S. households can expect higher heating costs this winter. In a conference call with reporters, API Chief Economist Erica Bowman discussed the approaching winter and underscored the need for increased natural pipeline capacity in the Northeast to help consumers there who historically have paid higher prices for energy than other parts of the country. 

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Energizing Massachusetts

massachusetts  infrastructure  natural gas pipelines  states2016  vote4energy 

Mark Green

Mark Green
Posted September 3, 2016

The key energy issue in Massachusetts, like a number of other New England states, is infrastructure. Massachusetts doesn’t produce natural gas and oil itself, so the state must bring these fuels in from elsewhere to heat homes and generate electricity for residences and businesses.

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Just Say ‘Yes’ on Natural Gas, Infrastructure

natural gas  pipelines  climate  infrastructure  costs 

Mark Green

Mark Green
Posted July 1, 2016

When you see the significant economic, consumer and climate benefits to the U.S. from increased  use of natural gas, it’s quite a puzzle when some won’t take “yes” for an answer – yes to lower energy costs, yes to infrastructure jobs, yes to carbon emissions reductions. Unfortunately for Massachusetts residents, that’s the path the state legislature appears to be taking. More below. First, a review of how clean-burning natural gas is making life better across the rest of the country.

Let’s start with reduced household energy costs, which are helping to lower Americans’ cost of living, according to the U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA). In constant 2015 dollars, EIA says average annual energy costs per household peaked at about $5,300 in 2008 then declined 14.1 percent in 2014.

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Energy Infrastructure Delivers Jobs, Affordable Energy

jobs  infrastructure  natural gas pipelines  investment  economic growth 

Jack Gerard

Jack Gerard
Posted May 18, 2016

The average American household has saved almost $750 in annual energy costs compared to 2008, according to recent data released by the U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA). Greater availability of domestic oil and natural gas, made possible by hydraulic fracturing, has helped drive down prices for gasoline, electricity and home heating.

Keeping affordable, reliable energy moving to families and businesses requires infrastructure -- pipelines, storage, processing, rail and maritime resources. Candidates often make infrastructure development a centerpiece of their economic plans, promising to create jobs and modernize the U.S. transportation system by improving roads, bridges, rail networks and airports. Energy infrastructure should be on that list. Shovel-ready projects abound in the energy sector.

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Locking Arms on Energy Infrastructure

infrastructure  natural gas pipelines  economic growth  jobs  climate  labor unions 

Mark Green

Mark Green
Posted May 16, 2016

We kick off “Infrastructure Week 2016,” a seven-day focus on America’s infrastructure needs, sponsored by more than 100 trade associations and business and labor groups, with a conversation API President and CEO Jack Gerard and Sean McGarvey, president of North America’s Building Trades Unions, had last week with reporters covering a range of infrastructure and energy policy issues. Highlights below.

Gerard and McGarvey framed the infrastructure discussion by pointing out the way new pipelines, pipeline expansions and other projects are needed to harness America’s energy revolution and spread the benefits of the new energy abundance – to consumersworkers, businesses and to the betterment of the environment – to all parts of the country.

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Energy Delivers for Consumers and Workers

natural gas  natural gas pipelines  economic growth  manufacturing  infrastructure 

Mark Green

Mark Green
Posted May 3, 2016

Two more data sets underscore the positive economic impact of America’s energy revolution and the relevance of the U.S. model of concurrent energy and economic growth, consumer benefits and climate progress.

First the consumer benefits part. The U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) reports that Americans’ cost of living is lower since June 2014, thanks to reduced household energy costs because of decreases in crude oil and natural gas prices. (Right here we’ll add that increased U.S. oil and gas production is a key driver in these declines that are benefiting consumers.)

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Amplifying the Pro-Infrastructure Message

infrastructure  oil and natural gas  pipelines  policy  lng exports 

Mark Green

Mark Green
Posted May 2, 2016

This wonderful domestic energy abundance and the global LNG market opportunities could be impacted by challenges facing infrastructure expansion here at home. America needs more energy infrastructure to move domestic supply to all areas of the country, for residential consumers, power generators and manufacturers. Yet, without stronger high-level backing, we could see these infrastructure needs delayed or rejected, as occurred last month with the proposed Constitution natural gas pipeline in New York.

Americans overwhelmingly support more energy infrastructure, and there appears to be bipartisan consensus for it in Congress. But infrastructure projects are being targeted by a vocal minority – even though increased domestic use of natural gas is the leading reason the United States is leading the world in reducing carbon emissions. A key going forward is gaining infrastructure support from the White House and the administration, said Marty Durbin, API’s executive director for market development.

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Infrastructure and Harnessing U.S. Shale Energy

infrastructure  natural gas pipelines  economic growth  heat  electricity 

Mark Green

Mark Green
Posted January 28, 2016

The U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) reports that a number of recently completed and soon-to-be-completed pipeline projects are expected to increase access to natural gas from the Marcellus and Utica shale regions, providing valuable linkage between production centers and consumers or export terminals.                         

We see the increase in natural gas pipeline capacity in the Northeast region, which is particularly critical because the Northeast has suffered negative effects from energy infrastructure limitations. EIA estimates that Northeast residents paid up to 68 percent more for electricity than the national average in the winter of 2014, while industrial users paid up to 105 percent more for electricity than the national average. Indeed, greater capacity is key to staving off economic penalties that could stem from insufficient infrastructure. One study estimated  that failure to expand natural gas and electricity infrastructure in the Northeast could cost the region’s households and businesses $5.4 billion in higher energy costs and more than 167,000 private-sector and construction jobs between 2016 and 2020.

So this is good news for the Northeast, but also other regions. 

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Taking Stock of America’s Energy Revolution

news  oil and natural gas  energy supply  ethanol in gasoline  alaska  offshore drilling  natural gas pipelines  infrastructure 

Mark Green

Mark Green
Posted May 26, 2015

Reuters: U.S. Republicans have had to watch from the sidelines as the Obama White House has taken political credit for America's unexpected energy boom and tumbling gas prices. Now it has left their presidential candidates scrambling for a way to reclaim leadership on an issue the party once seemed to own.

Their apparent answer: calling time on a 40-year-old federal ban on crude oil exports and using the newfound energy bounty to strategic advantage.

"We've got an abundance of supply," Wisconsin Governor Scott Walker said this week in Oklahoma at a gathering of putative Republican candidates for next year's presidential election. Lifting the ban, he said, would allow exports to "our allies in Europe, where, instead of being dependent on (President) Vladimir Putin and the Russians, they could be dependent on Americans."

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