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Energy Tomorrow Blog

Shale Energy, Economic Growth, Declining Imports

domestic energy  oil and natural gas development  economic benefits  government revenues  eia  oil imports  access  regulation  fracking 

Mark Green

Mark Green
Posted December 10, 2014

Two U.S. energy production updates and a new Congressional Budget Office (CBO) report showing the economic impacts of America’s shale energy revolution – which is driving overall U.S. production.

A chart from energy/economics blogger Mark J. Perry shows the impact of U.S. energy production on energy imports – measuring net petroleum imports as a share of products supplied. The chart shows steady increases in imports from the mid-1980s to an apex of more than 60 percent in 2005. Today, we’re looking at a percentage share that’s as low as it has been in four decades.

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Keystone XL and American Energy Security

keystone xl pipeline  oil imports  exports  natural gas pipelines  utica shale  hydraulic fracturing 

Mark Green

Mark Green
Posted November 6, 2014

National Journal: Republicans' midterm victory means a Keystone XL pipeline is coming front-and-center to Congress's energy agenda, but that doesn't mean President Obama wants to talk about it.

Obama got a question during his Wednesday presser about a bill that ascendant Republicans plan to send him on approving the Keystone XL oil-sands pipeline. Obama didn't say point blank whether he'd reject the bill, instead saying he would let the "process play out" with the ongoing State Department review. He added that his parameters for evaluating the project are whether it would be good for U.S. pocketbooks, would really create jobs, and would not worsen climate change.

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Policy Briefing: The Keystone XL’s National Interest and Security Implications

american petroleum institute  keystone xl pipeline  canada  crude oil  imports 

Mark Green

Mark Green
Posted July 23, 2013

A decision on whether the Keystone XL pipeline is in the U.S. national interest has been before the president for nearly five years – despite the fact the project has cleared four environmental reviews by the State Department, would create tens of thousands of U.S. jobs, would strengthen our energy partnership with Canada, our leading supplier of imported crude oil and enjoys overwhelming support from the American people.

Check in with a policy briefing on the Keystone XL’s national interest and security implications, hosted by The Hill:


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Let's Have A Parade

energy information administration  crude oil  crude oil production  oil imports  energy access  domestic energy reserves 

Mark Green

Mark Green
Posted March 21, 2013

New from the U.S. Energy Information Administration:

Monthly crude oil production in the United States is expected to exceed the amount of U.S. crude oil imports later this year for the first time since February 1995. The gap between monthly U.S. crude oil production and imports is projected to be almost 2 million barrels per day (bbl/d) by the end of next year—according to EIA's March 2013 Short-Term Energy Outlook.

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Domestic Oil and Natural Gas Development, Security and Freedom

consumption  crude oil  domestic energy  natural gas  oil imports 

Mark Green

Mark Green
Posted January 2, 2013

Oil and natural gas, which has played a major role in the United States’ emergence as a modern super power, is ours in abundance – as noted in recent reports by the International Energy Agency, the U.S. Energy Administration and IHS Global Insight. With pro-development policies, American-made energy can help lead a new period of U.S. growth and advancement.

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China Invests in U.S. Oil and Gas

chesapeake energy corporation  china  de facto moratorium  domestic energy  drilling permits  energy  gulf of mexico  horizontal drilling  oil imports  texas 

Jane Van Ryan

Jane Van Ryan
Posted October 18, 2010

China has overtaken the United States as the world's largest energy consumer, according to the International Energy Agency (IEA). The executive director of the IEA Nobuo Tanaka said last week, "Probably half of the oil demand increase comes from China." (Reuters) 

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