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Energy Tomorrow Blog

Crude Oil Prices Up

crude oil  crude oil prices  gasoline prices  prices  rhetoric vs reality  gasoline price factors 

Jane Van Ryan

Jane Van Ryan
Posted April 7, 2010

Crude oil prices stood at $86.84 per barrel when the market closed yesterday, marking their highest level since October 2008.

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Gasoline Prices Track Crude Oil Costs

crude oil prices  domestic energy  energy information administration  gasoline prices  oil demand  oil supply  prices 

Jane Van Ryan

Jane Van Ryan
Posted March 11, 2010

The average U.S. retail price for regular gasoline rose by 4.9 cents to $2.751 per gallon for the week ending March 8, according to the Energy Information Administration (EIA). This average price is higher than one year ago when the average pump price was 81 cents lower and crude oil costs were 88.9 cents a gallon lower.

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U.S. Crude Oil Production Continues at Four-Year Highs

crude oil  domestic energy  energy demand  energy production  oil production  api monthly statistical report 

Jane Van Ryan

Jane Van Ryan
Posted November 18, 2009

October U.S. crude oil production averaged 5.36 million barrels per day, continuing at levels not seen since 2005, according to API's Monthly Statistical Report

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Pump Price Update

crude oil  energy tomorrow  energytomorrow  gas prices  gasoline prices  prices 

Jane Van Ryan

Jane Van Ryan
Posted October 7, 2009

If a picture is worth a thousand words, the graph below speaks volumes about the price of gasoline. It illustrates how much gasoline's pump price has fallen in various regions of the country since gasoline reached a record high in July 2008.

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New Rule Penalizes Petroleum

crude oil  demand  energy  energy reality  prices  supply  ftc 

Jane Van Ryan

Jane Van Ryan
Posted August 6, 2009

Today, the Federal Trade Commission (FTC) announced a new petroleum market "price manipulation" rule that could lead to a less competitive market--hurting American consumers of gasoline, diesel and other petroleum products. Furthermore, it could discourage companies from providing information to the marketplace. 

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Oil Sands Emissions Comparable to Other Crude Oils

cogeneration  crude oil  domestic energy  efficiency  emissions  energy  oil sands 

Jane Van Ryan

Jane Van Ryan
Posted July 27, 2009

Two new independent studies commissioned by the Alberta Energy Research Institute (AERI) have found that emissions from producing, transporting and refining oil sands are not significantly higher than emissions from other forms of crude oil refined in the United States. The studies found that direct greenhouse gas emissions from oil-sands derived crude oils are generally 10 percent higher, but when cogeneration is taken into consideration, the difference disappears. 

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Fuel Demand: An Economic Indicator

crude oil  demand  diesel  energy  energy reality  opec  supply 

Jane Van Ryan

Jane Van Ryan
Posted July 16, 2009

If you're looking for an indicator that describes the current economy, look no further than API's oil demand and supply statistics. API reported today that U.S. petroleum deliveries--a key measure of demand--in the first six months of 2009 fell to its lowest level for the time period in more than a decade. 

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Gasoline Prices: It's the Fundamentals

crude oil  demand  diesel  domestic access  energy  energy policy  gasoline prices  prices  supply 

Jane Van Ryan

Jane Van Ryan
Posted June 16, 2009

Gasoline prices have risen to an average of $2.67 a gallon, the highest price in the past eight months. API's Chief Economist John Felmy and Statistics Manager Ron Planting attribute the price rise largely to what they call "market fundamentals"--the basic law of supply and demand.

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Diesel Fuel: Priced Lower than Gasoline for the First Time in Nearly Two Years

crude oil  demand  diesel fuel  diesel prices  energy  energy reality  gasoline  prices 

Jane Van Ryan

Jane Van Ryan
Posted June 1, 2009

When economists are asked why the price of fuel fluctuates, they often explain that price changes are due to the "market"--the interaction of all of the people around the world who buy and sell crude oil and fuels in the global marketplace. These buyers and sellers decide how much oil and oil products they are willing to buy or sell at a given price. Their decisions can be affected by several factors including weather, refinery operations, and geopolitical and economic conditions. The price of other commodities, such as wheat and corn, are determined in much the same way. I touched on these points a bit in last Friday's post.

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