Skip to main content

Energy Tomorrow Blog

Government Barriers to a Secure Energy Future

analysis  energy exports  crude oil  regulation  methane  epa  Jack Gerard 

Mark Green

Mark Green
Posted August 24, 2015

Two items from the weekend help sharpen the focus a strategic choice before Americans as they look to the future: Which energy path will we take?

One path leads to increased domestic energy development. It’s typified by safe and responsible oil and natural gas production that harnesses America’s energy wealth to create jobs, grow the economy and make the U.S. more secure in the world.

Another path likely would lead to very little of the above. It’s characterized by unnecessary regulation and self-limiting policies that hinder or block domestic development. America would be less secure, economically and in the world, and our allies, too.

The two paths, two very different futures – for American energy and America.

More »

Energizing Kentucky

analysis  kentucky  biofuels  economy and energy  ghg emission reduction  income  ozone regulations  wood mackenzie  pricewaterhousecoopers 

Reid Porter

Reid Porter
Posted August 24, 2015

Our series highlighting the economic and jobs impact of energy in each of the 50 states continues today with Kentucky. We started the series with Virginia on June 29. All information covered in this series can be found online here, arranged on an interactive map of the United States. State-specific information across the country will be populated on this map as the series continues.

As we can see with Kentucky, the energy impacts of the states individually combine to form energy’s national economic and jobs picture: 9.8 million jobs supported and $1.2 trillion in value added.

More »

Interactive: Exploring Our Energy Tomorrow

analysis  energy tomorrow  energy information administration  energy outlook 

Mark Green

Mark Green
Posted August 21, 2015

America’s energy strategy, short-term and long-term, is the sum of inputs: resource and production data, policy goals, technology, market conditions and more. These underpin the national conversation about the energy future of the United States and prospects for energy security – today, tomorrow and down the road.

Using federal energy information data we’ve launched a new website, Our Energy Tomorrow. It’s an interactive web experience that allows visitors to explore a variety of energy futures, based on inputs they select – including resource availability, advances in technology and federal legislation. These in turn generate a number of useable, shareable charts, graphs and trend lines that illustrate the energy scenario chosen.

More »

Energizing New Hampshire

analysis  new hampshire  crude oil exports  economy and energy  income  lng  pricewaterhousecoopers  revenue  trade  wood mackenzie 

Reid Porter

Reid Porter
Posted August 21, 2015

Our series highlighting the economic and jobs impact of energy in each of the 50 states continues today with New Hampshire. We started the series with Virginia on June 29 and reviewed Hawaii, Idaho , Vermont and Oklahoma to begin this week. All information covered in this series can be found online here, arranged on an interactive map of the United States. State-specific information across the country will be populated on this map as the series continues.

As we can see with New Hampshire, the energy impacts of the states individually combine to form energy’s national economic and jobs picture: 9.8 million jobs supported and $1.2 trillion in value added.

More »

Access, For a Robust Offshore Energy Sector

analysis  access  offshore energy  offshore leases  gulf of mexico  boem 

Mark Green

Mark Green
Posted August 20, 2015

Some observations on this week’s federal oil and natural gas lease sale in the Western Gulf of Mexico, reported with alarm by some media outlets because it wasn’t as large as other recent sales.

First, every lease sale is welcome. Access to U.S. offshore reserves represents opportunity for energy development, job creation, economic growth and greater American energy security. We need more offshore opportunities to support the strategic, long-term energy security of the United States – advanced by a robust offshore energy sector.

This week the Bureau of Ocean Energy Management (BOEM) announced five companies submitted 33 bids on 33 tracts in the Western Gulf, with high bids totaling about $22.7 million.

More »

Energizing Oklahoma

analysis  oklahoma  biofuels  e15  energy  ethanol  gasoline prices  pricewaterhousecoopers  renewable fuel standard  wood mackenzie 

Reid Porter

Reid Porter
Posted August 20, 2015

Our series highlighting the economic and jobs impact of energy in each of the 50 states continues today with Oklahoma. We started the series with Virginia on June 29 and reviewed Hawaii, Idaho and Vermont this week. All information covered in this series can be found online here, arranged on an interactive map of the United States. State-specific information across the country will be populated on this map as the series continues.

As we can see with Oklahoma, the energy impacts of the states individually combine to form energy’s national economic and jobs picture: 9.8 million jobs supported and $1.2 trillion in value added.

More »

Energizing Idaho

analysis  idaho  income  e15  economy and energy  ethanol  gasoline prices  renewable fuel standard  pricewaterhousecoopers  wood mackenzie 

Reid Porter

Reid Porter
Posted August 18, 2015

Our series highlighting the economic and jobs impact of energy in each of the 50 states continues today with Idaho. We started the series with Virginia on June 29 and reviewed Hawaii to begin this week. All information covered in this series can be found online here, arranged on an interactive map of the United States. State-specific information across the country will be populated on this map as the series continues.

As we can see with Idaho, the energy impacts of the states individually combine to form energy’s national economic and jobs picture: 9.8 million jobs supported and $1.2 trillion in value added.

More »

A Step Forward on Oil Exports

analysis  mexico  crude oil  energy exports  trade  economic benefits  american petroleum institute 

Mark Green

Mark Green
Posted August 17, 2015

Late last week the Obama administration gave the go-ahead for limited domestic crude oil exports to Mexico, a positive move on oil exports – yet one that immediately underscores this question: Why stop there?

According to the Associated Press, license applications approved by the Commerce Department allow the exchange of similar amounts of U.S. and Mexican crude, a swap. The U.S. would send an as-yet unspecified amount of light crude to Mexico in exchange for heavier Mexican crude. AP:

While the Commerce Department simultaneously rejected other applications for crude exports that violated the ban, the move to allow trading with Mexico marked a significant shift and an additional sign that the Obama administration may be open to loosening the export ban. Exchanges of oil are one of a handful of exemptions permitted under the export ban put in place by Congress.

Two things: First, the arrangement with Mexico, while limited in scope, nonetheless is the administration affirming the inherent benefits of trade. The light crude in the deal represents some of the domestic oil that’s accumulating and trading at a discount to global prices, unable to reach the world market because it’s shut in by an outdated, anti-competitive oil exports ban. Second, the U.S. needs to go further.

More »

Energizing Hawaii

analysis  hawaii  energy  income  offshore access  oil and natural gas development  pricewaterhousecoopers  royalties  wood mackenzie 

Reid Porter

Reid Porter
Posted August 17, 2015

Our series highlighting the economic and jobs impact of energy in each of the 50 states continues today with Hawaii. We started the series with Virginia on June 29 and continued with Montana, Iowa,  Alabama, Arizona and Nebraska last  week. All information covered in this series can be found online here, arranged on an interactive map of the United States. State-specific information across the country will be populated on this map as the series continues.

As we can see with Hawaii, the energy impacts of the states individually combine to form energy’s national economic and jobs picture: 9.8 million jobs supported and $1.2 trillion in value added.

More »

Oil Exports, Iran and U.S. Global Competitiveness

analysis  energy exports  crude oil  economic growth  domestic oil production  gasoline prices  Jack Gerard 

Mark Green

Mark Green
Posted August 14, 2015

We’ve put up a number of posts recently that argue for lifting the United States’ decades-old ban on exporting domestic crude oil – citing sound economic, trade and security reasons. Underlying them all is this: As an energy superpower, America will see more benefits here at home, be more secure and help make the world safer if U.S. crude is allowed to trade freely in the global marketplace.

Now, there is a compelling, market reason for urgency in ending the export ban – a self-sanctioning relic of the 1970s that hinders U.S. global competitiveness while impeding domestic energy development and economic growth. That would be the impacts on global crude markets if/when Iran resumes exporting oil under the proposed nuclear agreement the White House is advancing.

More »