Skip to main content

Energy Tomorrow Blog

Energy Today – June 20, 2013

Economy  hydraulic fracturing  jobs  Jobs and Economy  keystone xl  oil  oil sands 

Mary Leshper

Mary Schaper
Posted June 20, 2013

Fuel Fix BlogIEA: U.S. Natural Gas Output to Accelerate Next Year

A new estimate from the International Energy Agency says  that 2014-2018 domestic natural gas production will increase thanks to expanded hydraulic fracturing. U.S. shale production increased six-fold to 265 billion cubic meters last year from 45 billion in 2007.

CNBC Underground Economy: How Shale Is ‘Fracking’ the Old Order

CNBC’s top states for business ranking reflects a reordering because of  a U.S. energy surge that “has literally transformed the financial landscape of the central corridor; creating jobs and rising incomes." According to CNBC, this points to the importance of policies that encourage more energy development. "The reality is, California could reap the same shale-oil and shale-gas bounties now benefiting North Dakota. Politicians simply choose not to."

More »

Energy Today – June 19, 2013

Economy  science  engineers  hydraulic fracturing  keystone xl  manufacturing 

Mary Leshper

Mary Schaper
Posted June 19, 2013

Free Enterprise Energizing Manufacturing

Current North American energy abundance is the result of innovation and private-sector investment, writes FE. “Government policies that restrict development or prevent the market from working effectively may reduce the benefits this energy competitive advantage offers to Americans and to our manufacturing industries.”

Project SyndicateFrack to the Future

Harvard professor and former Clinton administration economic advisor Jeffrey Frankel argues the environmental benefits of increased natural gas use, noting that “one can virtually prove that shale gas is the major factor behind the fall in US emissions.”

More »

Energy Today – June 14, 2013

Economy  exports  hydraulic fracturing  innovation  jobs  lng  natural gas  renewables  technology 

Mary Leshper

Mary Schaper
Posted June 14, 2013

Fuel Fix BlogReport: Renewables, Natural Gas Should Work Together On the Grid

According to a new report by the Texas Clean Energy Coalition, natural gas and renewables “have a strong complimentary relationship” that is beneficial for providing the energy Americans need every day.

Today in EnergyU.S. Crude Oil Production Could Reach 10M Barrels Per Day By 2040

EIA projects that thanks in large part to increased tight oil production – shale development – domestic production could continue to expand to 10 million barrels per day or higher by 2040.

More »

Gasoline Prices and Real Help for Consumers

access  energy  gasoline  regulation  Energy 101  Jobs and Economy  gas prices  fuel prices  Onshore Oil Production  Onshore Gas Production 

Mark Green

Mark Green
Posted May 23, 2013

Gasoline prices have been rising with the approach of the summer driving season – up to about $3.66, according to AAA – pushed there by rising crude oil prices. U.S. consumers need help. And they could get it – if the administration pursued a number of energy policies to put downward pressure on global crude costs, while abandoning other choices that could harm consumers.

API Chief Economist John Felmy’s reporter briefing Thursday focused attention on two paths: one that will increase domestic production of oil and natural gas and one that won’t. Unfortunately, the administration – via proposals to increase energy taxes and a new wave of questionable regulation – looks headed down the wrong path, a recipe for disaster for American energy:

More »

Rising U.S. Oil Supply and the Impact on Global Markets

access  crude oil  energy information administration  oil supply  Energy 101  Economy  global markets 

Mark Green

Mark Green
Posted May 17, 2013

Increasing U.S. domestic production of oil matters. Energy Information Administration (EIA) chief Adam Sieminski had this analysis at an energy conference earlier this week (h/t Breaking Energy):

“There’s a fairly significant, long-standing relationship between spare production capacity in OPEC and what the pricing environment is for oil. So the 2 million barrel per day  increase in U.S. oil production that surprisingly took place over the last five years has resulted in higher OPEC spare capacity, and undoubtedly, has been a factor in why Brent oil prices are $103-$104/bbl rather than $125-$130/bbl.”

More »

Keystone XL: Safe for the Environment

economy and energy  keystone xl pipeline  oil sands pipeline  energy 

Mark Green

Mark Green
Posted May 1, 2013

Each of the State Department’s four reviews of the Keystone XL pipeline – during the more than four years the project has been under consideration – focused primarily on the Keystone XL’s impacts on the environment: air, ground and surface water, wetlands, vegetation, wildlife and more. State went beyond the Keystone XL itself, evaluating the environmental impact of oil sands crude that would be delivered through it – as well as the impacts on Canada.

Bottom line: Each review came to the same conclusion – the Keystone XL’s construction and operation will not significantly impact the environment. From the most recent State assessment, issued in March:

The analyses of potential impacts associated with construction and normal operation of the proposed Project suggest that there would be no significant impacts to most resources along the proposed Project route …

More »

Oil, Natural Gas and Taxes - The Choice Revisited

taxes and revenue  energy  economy and energy  access 

Mark Green

Mark Green
Posted February 5, 2013

Energy is essential to running our economy and securing our standard of living.  At a very basic level we can get the energy we need in one of three ways: 1. We can produce it domestically; 2. U.S. companies can produce it abroad for sale in the U.S.; 3. Foreign companies can produce it abroad for sale in the U.S. Two of these three ways offer a clear advantage in creating American jobs, boosting the American economy and supplying revenue to American governments.

More »

About the Keystone XL Pipeline …

natural gas  keystone xl pipeline  energy economy  oil 

Mark Green

Mark Green
Posted February 1, 2013

A sampling of recent editorial opinion and commentary on the Keystone XL pipeline project:

Nature.com

… regarding the Keystone pipeline, the administration should face down critics of the project, ensure that environmental standards are met and then approve it. … By approving Keystone, Obama can bolster his credibility within industry and among conservatives. The president can also take advantage of rising domestic oil and gas production to defuse concerns over energy security.

More »

Energy Security, Economic Security and Retirement Security

energy economy  energy investment  natural gas 

Jack Gerard

Jack Gerard
Posted January 31, 2013

More than 97 percent of stock in U.S. oil and natural gas companies is held by the public, including many Americans who depend on these earnings to secure their retirements through investments in IRAs, 401(k)s and pension funds. So when oil and natural gas company earnings are strong, it’s good news for retirees.

More »

Checking Off the Arguments for the Keystone XL Pipeline

revenue  oil sands  keystone xl pipeline  energy economy  access 

Mark Green

Mark Green
Posted January 30, 2013

Two pieces of new polling info linked to the Keystone XL pipeline.

First, Rasmussen reports that the project, after more than four years on the Obama administration’s “to do” list, enjoys support from 59 percent of those surveyed. Just 28 percent oppose. Strong supporters (34 percent) outnumber strong opponents (10 percent) by more than three to one. There’s been strong support for the Keystone XL in polls by Fox News and Pew Research.

Speaking of Pew, last week they released another of their periodic surveys showing the issues Americans think are most important as President Obama and Congress get to work this year. Topping the list is strengthening the economy (86 percent say it’s a “top priority”), followed by improving the job situation (79 percent) and reducing the budget deficit (72 percent). What’s this got to with the Keystone XL pipeline?

More »