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Energy Tomorrow Blog

High Stakes for the U.S. Response to Global Market Shifts

fuel supply  energy demand  opec 

Dean Foreman

Dean Foreman
Posted March 12, 2020

Global oil markets have shifted dramatically in recent days and weeks, and the stakes are high for the United States energy revolution, retirement savings and the broader economy.

Let’s start with crude oil prices. Per Bloomberg, the per-barrel price of West Texas Intermediate (WTI) on March 9 was about half of what it was on Dec. 31, falling to $31.13 from $61.06. 

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Electric Vehicles: If You Build Them, Will Buyers Come?

electric vehicles  consumers  energy demand 

Dean Foreman

Dean Foreman
Posted March 11, 2020

Several states are taking the lead to promote electric vehicles (EVs), and they’re not the states that produce them. From California and Oregon to New Jersey and Maryland, their promotions are mainly efforts intended to reduce carbon dioxide emissions.

But even with large state incentives, are consumers onboard?   

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Columnist Gets it Wrong – Energy Companies Can Help Shape a Cleaner Future

climate change  innovation  technology  energy supply and demand 

Megan Barnett Bloomgren

Megan Bloomgren
Posted January 27, 2020

In his Jan. 10 column, the Houston Chronicle’s Chris Tomlinson took some shots at API’s new Energy for Progress campaign, which I addressed in a letter to the Chronicle’s editor. There’s only so much you can say in the 250 words you’re allotted for an LTE, so I thought I’d tackle Tomlison’s criticisms in greater detail here – actually, the kind of back-and-forth we’re trying to spark in our campaign.

For starters, Chris – like some politicians – fell prey to a tired and inaccurate caricature of the industry and dedicated his column to questioning our industry’s intentions instead of dedicating ink to the actual objectives before modern society – addressing the growing challenge of climate change while also making sure Americans have the energy they need.

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U.S. Natural Gas – Meeting the Energy Poverty Challenge

natural gas  liquefied natural gas  energy exports  global energy demand  electricity 

Sam Winstel

Sam Winstel
Posted September 25, 2019

Energy is essential to a modern standard of living, and as the leading energy sources, natural gas and oil are foundational to almost everything we do – lighting our homes, heating our hospitals and powering our workplaces.

The U.S. is the world’s leading natural gas and oil producer, which is critically important given new projections that global energy consumption will increase nearly 50% by 2050. Though reliable access to energy often is taken for granted in this country, people in other parts of the world struggle to obtain the energy needed for sustainable development and to empower basic human progress.

According to the International Energy Agency (IEA), nearly one in eight people around the world lives without electricity, and 2.7 billion people currently are without access to clean cooking facilities. Without power for heating, lighting and advanced technologies, human potential is severely limited. And in the absence of cleaner fuels, people must use coal, kerosene, biomass and other energy sources to prepare food, which contributes to harmful and unnecessary indoor air pollution.

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The U.S. as Global Oil Growth Supplier

global energy demand  crude oil supplies  iea  us energy security 

Jessica  Lutz

Jessica Lutz
Posted June 19, 2019

Another big indication of the global impact of the U.S. energy revolution comes in the International Energy Agency’s (IEA) oil market report and its outlook for 2020, which says the United States will be responsible for virtually all of this year’s increase in oil supply. …

The fact that the U.S. is projected to fill this role is significant in terms of global market stability and the world’s security – that is, the United States as this growth supplier, versus less stable and/or less friendly regimes.  


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Natural Gas: The Global Fuel of Choice

natural gas  eia  iea  emission reductions  global energy demand 

Jessica  Lutz

Jessica Lutz
Posted March 26, 2019

Natural gas is playing a lead role in meeting rapidly increasing global energy demand, and its growing use in electricity generation has resulted in significant savings in carbon dioxide emissions worldwide. These points were echoed by the International Energy Agency (IEA) in its Global Energy and CO2 Status Report released this week.

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Want to lower consumer energy costs? Invest in energy infrastructure.

infrastructure  consumers  pipelines  development  demand  production 

Jessica  Lutz

Jessica Lutz
Posted January 15, 2019

The U.S. natural gas and oil pipeline network spans 2.7 million miles. And while that may sound like a lot, a recent Wall Street Journal article reminds us that U.S. energy infrastructure is still failing to keep up with production and demand. Americans in some parts of the country remain under-served while companies in high-production areas are forced to offload excess natural gas resources – all because of a lack of adequate infrastructure, and regulatory barriers to new development.

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IEA: Opportunity for U.S. Energy as Global Demand Grows

iea  energy demand  us energy  exports 

Mark Green

Mark Green
Posted November 15, 2017

IEA’s statement above is remarkable. What it means is that the energy security goals U.S. leaders have discussed for more than 40 years appear to be coming into view. Thanks to modern, data analytics-based exploration and production, the United States will produce natural gas and oil at unprecedented levels, decreasing oil imports and growing opportunities for U.S. energy in the global marketplace. 

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Hurricane Update: Three things you need to know about claims of fuel price gouging

florida  gasoline demand  gasoline supply  hurricane-harvey  hurricane-irma  hurricane response  refineries  retail price 

Mark Green

Mark Green
Posted September 8, 2017

With Hurricane Irma threatening Florida, here are three things you need to know related to claims of fuel price gouging:

1. Industry Does Not Condone Price Gouging
2. Gasoline Stations are largely owned by mom-and-pop retailers
3. Supply and Demand Influences Prices

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Growing Energy Needs Drive Supply Decisions

news  energy demand  global production  shale energy  lng  renewable fuel standard  fuels 

Mark Green

Mark Green
Posted June 12, 2015

Wall Street Journal Low oil prices and economic growth have helped drive up consumer demand for energy across the world in 2015, the International Energy Agency said Thursday, a phenomenon seen from U.S. gasoline stations to Chinese auto dealerships.

The IEA’s closely watched oil-market report lent some support to an idea pushed by the Organization of the Petroleum Exporting Countries and other producers: that collapsing oil prices would spur more consumer demand and eventually send prices back up. The benchmark U.S. oil price hit a six-month high on Wednesday.

The IEA said world demand for oil would increase by 1.4 million barrels a day this year, 300,000 barrels a day faster than it previously forecast, to a daily average of 94 million barrels this year. Global demand in 2014 was about 92.6 million barrels a day, the IEA said.

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