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Energy Tomorrow Blog

More Stringent Ozone Standard Unjustified

air quality  emissions  energy policy  environmental protection agency  epa  ozone  ulsd  ultra-low sulfur diesel  ozone pollution standard 

Jane Van Ryan

Jane Van Ryan
Posted February 3, 2010

In testimony delivered in Houston yesterday, API's Policy Advisor Ten Steichen told the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) that its proposed new ozone pollution standard would exact significant costs on consumers, jobs and the economy without providing commensurate benefits.

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Clean Diesel in Your Tank

air quality  environmental protection agency  epa  fuel  gasoline  ulsd  ultra low sulfur diesel 

Jane Van Ryan

Jane Van Ryan
Posted January 5, 2010

The most massive fuel transition ever attempted in the United States has been occurring quite smoothly over the past few years without so much as a hiccup. It is the slow and steady movement from Low Sulfur Diesel Fuel to Ultra Low Sulfur Diesel (ULSD) fuel that started in 2006 and will continue through 2014.

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Airing the Truth

air quality  emissions  energy  epa  over regulation  ultra-low sulfur diesel 

Jane Van Ryan

Jane Van Ryan
Posted August 4, 2009

There's no doubt about it--the air is much cleaner today than it was a few years ago. The City of Los Angeles is no longer engulfed in a brown haze; the air in the Ohio Valley now has a crisp, clean smell; and Milwaukee residents are breathing easier than ever before.

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Climate Bill = Higher Diesel Prices

climate bill  diesel  energy  energy policy  over regulation  waxman-markey 

Jane Van Ryan

Jane Van Ryan
Posted July 27, 2009

The House-passed climate bill is one of the most complicated and costly bills ever considered by Congress. At more than 1,400 pages, it's even longer than War and Peace. Yet, there's a portion of the U.S. economy that is being short-changed by the measure--transportation, one of the most vital sectors of the economy and the American way of life. Our transportation system of roads, trains, buses, cars, trucks and airplanes makes it possible to get to work, to school, to church, vacation, and perhaps most importantly, to attend the most important milestones in our family's lives--births, graduations, and weddings. - See more at: http://energytomorrow.org/blog/author/13/P595#sthash.ZXzOdyk4.dpuf

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Fuel Demand: An Economic Indicator

crude oil  demand  diesel  energy  energy reality  opec  supply 

Jane Van Ryan

Jane Van Ryan
Posted July 16, 2009

If you're looking for an indicator that describes the current economy, look no further than API's oil demand and supply statistics. API reported today that U.S. petroleum deliveries--a key measure of demand--in the first six months of 2009 fell to its lowest level for the time period in more than a decade. 

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Breathe Deeply

air quality  domestic energy  efficiency  energy  fuel  technology innovation  ulsd  ultra-low sulfur diesel 

Jane Van Ryan

Jane Van Ryan
Posted July 7, 2009

Despite what you may have heard, the nation's air quality has improved markedly over the past several years. And part of the air quality improvement can be attributed to a major change in diesel fuel.

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Gasoline Prices: It's the Fundamentals

crude oil  demand  diesel  domestic access  energy  energy policy  gasoline prices  prices  supply 

Jane Van Ryan

Jane Van Ryan
Posted June 16, 2009

Gasoline prices have risen to an average of $2.67 a gallon, the highest price in the past eight months. API's Chief Economist John Felmy and Statistics Manager Ron Planting attribute the price rise largely to what they call "market fundamentals"--the basic law of supply and demand.

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Diesel Fuel: Priced Lower than Gasoline for the First Time in Nearly Two Years

crude oil  demand  diesel fuel  diesel prices  energy  energy reality  gasoline  prices 

Jane Van Ryan

Jane Van Ryan
Posted June 1, 2009

When economists are asked why the price of fuel fluctuates, they often explain that price changes are due to the "market"--the interaction of all of the people around the world who buy and sell crude oil and fuels in the global marketplace. These buyers and sellers decide how much oil and oil products they are willing to buy or sell at a given price. Their decisions can be affected by several factors including weather, refinery operations, and geopolitical and economic conditions. The price of other commodities, such as wheat and corn, are determined in much the same way. I touched on these points a bit in last Friday's post.

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