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Energy Tomorrow Blog

Domestic Energy Production is Fueling Growth

american energy  Economy  jobs  Energy Security  imports  growth 

Mary Leshper

Mary Schaper
Posted June 12, 2014

Bloomberg News: U.S. fuel imports fell to a 15-year seasonal low as refineries processed increasing domestic crude output, moving the nation closer to energy independence.

Deliveries slid 653,000 barrels a day to 1.68 million in the week ended June 6, the fewest for the period since 1999, the Energy Information Administration data showed today. The 28 percent drop was the biggest decline since the week ended June 18, 2013. Fuel imports peaked at 4.97 million barrels a day in October 2005.

“There’s a change in the dynamic,” said Phil Flynn, a senior market analyst at Price Futures Group in Chicago. “We’re not going to stop importing products but the overall number should move lower. We’re turning into a hub where products are both imported and exported based on price.”

Shipments to the U.S. from abroad have dropped as the shale boom provided refiners with an ample supply of cheaper domestic crude to make fuel. West Texas Intermediate, the U.S. benchmark crude, has traded at an average discount of $12 to Brent oil from the North Sea over the past four years. WTI traded at an average premium of more than $1 to the European grade from 1988 to 2008.

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America’s Hydraulic Fracturing Revolution

fracking  hydraulic fracturing  imports  Economy  jobs  Energy Security 

Mary Leshper

Mary Schaper
Posted April 17, 2014

Fuelfix Blog: In this photo essay, AP photographer Brennan Linsley looks inside a walled-off fracking facility, one of many sites reversing decades of declining oil production in the state.

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Shale Oil and Natural Gas Fueling a Bright Energy Future

american energy  imports  emissions  lng exports 

Mary Leshper

Mary Schaper
Posted April 10, 2014

EIA Today in Energy: U.S. crude oil proved reserves rose for the fourth consecutive year in 2012, increasing by 15% to 33 billion barrels, according to the U.S. Crude Oil and Natural Gas Proved Reserves (2012) report released April 10 by the U.S. Energy Information Administration. U.S. crude oil and lease condensate proved reserves were the highest since 1976, and the 2012 increase of 4.5 billion barrels was the largest annual increase since 1970, when 10 billion barrels of Alaskan crude oil were added to U.S. proved reserves. Contributing factors to higher crude oil reserves include increased exploration for liquid hydrocarbons, improved technology for developing tight oil plays, and sustained high historical crude oil prices.

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U.S. Energy Self-Sufficiency Comes Into View

energy outlook  access  domestic oil production  imports  energy information administration  fracking  technology 

Mark Green

Mark Green
Posted April 7, 2014

Take a good look at the chart below – brand-new from the U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA). The green line disappearing into the horizontal axis between the years 2030 and 2040 is what U.S. energy self-sufficiency looks like.

This is a big, big deal – a goal of every U.S. president since Richard Nixon more than 40 years ago: the point where domestic production exceeds imports, which EIA never included in any of its projections. Until now.

Because of surging tight-oil production – oil from shale and other tight-rock formations, developed with advanced hydraulic fracturing and horizontal drilling – the agency is including in its 2014 Annual Energy Outlook a high-production scenario under which net imports would reach near-zero between 2030 and 2040.

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More Domestic Energy Production, Fewer Imports = a Stronger U.S.

Energy Security  american energy  imports  fracking  jobs  Economy 

Mary Leshper

Mary Schaper
Posted April 2, 2014

Total U.S. net imports of energy, measured in terms of energy content, declined in 2013 to their lowest level in more than two decades. Growth in the production of oil and natural gas displaced imports and supported increased petroleum product exports, driving most of the decline. A large drop in energy imports together with a smaller increase in energy exports led to a 19% decrease in net energy imports from 2012 to 2013.

Total energy imports declined faster—down 9% from 2012 to 2013—than in the previous year, while export growth slowed. Crude oil production grew 15%, about the same pace as in 2012, which led imports of crude oil to decrease by 12%, accounting for much of the overall decline in imports.

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Pro-Development Energy Policies Will Spread the Energy Wealth

american energy  energy policy  imports  keystone xl pipeline  fracking 

Mary Leshper

Mary Schaper
Posted January 22, 2014

Major Economies’ Reliance on Oil and Natural Gas Imports Projected to Change Rapidly 

Changing Import Reliance

EIA Today in Energy: The 2014 Annual Energy Outlook projects declines in U.S. oil and natural gas imports as a result of increasing domestic production from tight oil and shale plays. U.S. liquid fuels net imports as a share of consumption is projected to decline from a high of 60% in 2005, and about 40% in 2012, to about 25% by 2016. The United States is also projected to become a net exporter of natural gas by 2018.

Conversely, other major economies are likely to become increasingly reliant on imported liquid fuels and natural gas. China, India, and OECD Europe will each import at least 65% of their oil and 35% of their natural gas by 2020—becoming more like Japan, which relies on imports for more than 95% of its oil and gas consumption.

The reasons for these shifts are different between emerging and developed economies. In China and India, oil demand growth from emergent middle classes will likely outpace domestic production, while OECD Europe will likely become more import reliant as a result of declining oil production in the North Sea.

Read more: http://1.usa.gov/1g1pCqW

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EIA's Outlook: Flush With U.S. Energy

american energy  oil production  natural gas supply  access  imports  fracking  shale energy 

Mark Green

Mark Green
Posted December 16, 2013

The U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) offered a preview of its 2014 Annual Energy Outlook that will come out next spring, and the second slide in Administrator Adam Sieminski’s presentation is an attention grabber, charting how expanding domestic oil production will reach historic levels in 2016 – 9.6 million barrels per day, a mark set in 1970.

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Talking Energy Security

Energy Security  hydraulic fracturing  imports 

Mark Green

Mark Green
Posted August 26, 2013

A couple of highlights from a speech to the American Legion’s 95th National Convention this weekend by API’s Erik Milito, director of upstream and industry operations:

The “trajectory from (natural gas) imports to exports is just one of the developments marking the emergence of the United States as a global energy superpower. … The United States is now the world’s leading producer of natural gas, and we’re on track to surpass Saudi Arabia as the number one oil producer by 2020.  For the first time in 18 years, we’ll be producing more crude oil than we import. 

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Policy Briefing: The Keystone XL’s National Interest and Security Implications

american petroleum institute  keystone xl pipeline  canada  crude oil  imports 

Mark Green

Mark Green
Posted July 23, 2013

A decision on whether the Keystone XL pipeline is in the U.S. national interest has been before the president for nearly five years – despite the fact the project has cleared four environmental reviews by the State Department, would create tens of thousands of U.S. jobs, would strengthen our energy partnership with Canada, our leading supplier of imported crude oil and enjoys overwhelming support from the American people.

Check in with a policy briefing on the Keystone XL’s national interest and security implications, hosted by The Hill:


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The RFS: Reality 1, Rhetoric 0

Energy 101  gasoline  imports  renewable fuel standard  rfs34  ethanol 

Bob Greco

Bob Greco
Posted June 28, 2013

There is a classic xkcd cartoon where a one of the characters says they can’t come to bed because “Someone is wrong on the internet.”  Though the options for who exactly that someone was are almost unlimited, statistically there is a good chance the character was referring to Bob Dinneen.  Witness this tweet:

Ehthanol Bog

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