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Energy Tomorrow Blog

More Tariffs, More Problems

trade  china  consumers  infrastructure 

Jessica  Lutz

Jessica Lutz
Posted July 26, 2018

The Trump administration has long touted its commitment to U.S. energy production but continues to push policies that directly counter these efforts, hurting U.S. workers and consumers in the process. The proposed Section 301 tariffs – and the retaliatory tariffs from China that they will provoke – are no exception.

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California’s Self-Imposed, Dangerous Energy Shortage

california  renewable energy  natural gas  consumers 

Jessica  Lutz

Jessica Lutz
Posted July 26, 2018

Californians are facing blisteringly hot weather conditions this week as the result of a “heat dome” centered across much of the state. To make matters worse, many have found themselves without power just as the temperatures reach dangerous highs. Now California’s power grid operator says it can’t produce enough electricity to meet demand, risking rolling blackouts and jeopardizing residents – an outcome they were explicitly warned of months ago. 

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When Tariffs Become a Food Discussion

trade  consumers  economy and energy 

Mark Green

Mark Green
Posted July 25, 2018

Tariffs and quotas on imported steel and other products appear to be moving from a debate in Washington to Americans’ dinner tables, as farmers and others in the human food chain voice concern that a trade war – tariffs and retaliatory measures by other countries – is impacting food costs. 


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Arbitrary Process for Steel Tariff Exclusions Hurts American Workers

infrastructure  pipelines  energy  trade  consumers 

Jessica  Lutz

Jessica Lutz
Posted July 25, 2018

While the administration’s goal of enhancing the economy is laudable — as is their continued promise to promote U.S. energy dominance— their latest action to deny exclusions from tariffs under Section 232 on imported steel used in certain parts of natural gas and oil industry operations is a misguided decision that could impact American energy production as well as American jobs and consumers.

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Progress and Opportunity: The State of Colorado Energy

colorado  natural gas  production 

Tracee Bentley

Tracee Bentley
Posted July 23, 2018

Colorado’s natural gas and oil industry thrives by working collaboratively with stakeholders of various and, sometimes, differing interests. Development in the Centennial State is well-regulated and places great emphasis on the safety of our communities and the environment, and the industry has grown by leaps and bounds as a result. In fact, Colorado is now the fifth-largest natural gas producer and the seventh-largest oil producer in the United States. This growth has fundamentally reshaped Colorado’s economy for the better, which is why these collaborative conversations must continue to occur.

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Think: U.S. Oil, Increased Access to Boost Global Supply

crude oil production  access  us energy security 

Mark Green

Mark Green
Posted July 20, 2018

Big news in the latest API Monthly Statistical Report: U.S. crude oil production rose to an all-time record of 10.7 million barrels per day (mbd) in June – the largest monthly output, ever. According to the MSR, June domestic crude production increased more than 100,000 barrels per day over May, and the total was 1.6 million barrels per day more than June a year ago. But let’s go back to that top-line number – 10.7 million barrels per day – and comprehend what it means:

Economic growth and jobs – but also our country’s energy security, supporting the promise of present and future prosperity and opportunity. That’s the gift of the American energy renaissance that, well, keeps on giving.

All of the above support an argument that – to ensure an adequate global supply of crude oil upon which the U.S. and global economies rely – we should look to sustain and grow domestic natural gas and oil production. 

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The Cost to Bail Out Coal, Nuclear (Hint: It’s A Lot)

coal  nuclear  consumers  natural gas 

Jessica  Lutz

Jessica Lutz
Posted July 19, 2018

As it turns out, you can put a dollar figure on the cost to prop up failing coal and nuclear plants, and that figure could reach $35 billion a year — cost that could largely impact American consumers and/or taxpayers, for no discernible improvement to the nation's electric grid.

The Trump administration has used grid reliability, “resilience” and, more recently, national security as reasons for the government to bail out coal and nuclear plants – claims we’ve rebutted.  Now we can add ‘exorbitant potential cost to the American people’ to the list of reasons why propping up coal and nuclear is a bad idea.

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Consumers, U.S. Energy Security Impacted by Tariffs

trade  consumers  pipelines  us energy security 

Mark Green

Mark Green
Posted July 19, 2018

The Trump administration’s rejection of Plains All American’s request for an exclusion to the administration’s tariffs on imported steel – which the company planned for a pipeline out of the Permian Basin, the nation’s most dynamic oilfield – illustrates the head-on collision between trade policies and energy goals.

Caught in the middle: American consumers and U.S. energy security.


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EPA Should Protect Consumers from the Broken Ethanol Mandate

e10 blend wall  epa  rfs34  ethanol 

Jessica  Lutz

Jessica Lutz
Posted July 18, 2018

In the decade since the inception of the RFS, EPA has consistently implemented the mandate in a manner that dictates more and more ethanol into a fuels market regardless of whether market conditions can bear such an increase.  The ever-increasing volumes of ethanol in the fuel supply – more than can be used in E10 gasoline - inefficiently pushes fuels such as E15 into the marketplace. This puts consumers at risk because three out of four vehicles in the U.S. fleet were not built to use E15, including some model year 2018 cars and trucks from BMW, Mazda, Mercedes, Mitsubishi, Subaru and Volvo, among others. A number of automakers have said that using E15 could potentially void car warranties. Moreover, E15 is not compatible with motorcycles, boats, lawn equipment and ATVs. 

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Natural Gas and Leading the World in Reducing CO2

natural gas benefits  emission reductions  carbon dioxide  electricity 

Mark Green

Mark Green
Posted July 18, 2018

There’s talk about reducing greenhouse gas emissions – and then there’s taking steps to produce measurable results. The United States is in the second category, with the natural gas and oil industry playing the leading role.

Two charts from the American Enterprise Institute’s Mark J. Perry help illustrate: First, using data gleaned from BP’s Statistical Review of Global Energy, Perry shows that the U.S. led the world in reducing carbon dioxide emissions in 2017.


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