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Energy Tomorrow Blog

Ozone Regulation and the Nation’s Economic Health

ozone standards  epa  economic growth  air quality 

Mark Green

Mark Green
Posted November 19, 2014

A couple of data points to remember with EPA poised to propose new, lower ground-level ozone standards, perhaps as soon as next month:

Air quality is and has been improving under the current, 75 parts per billion (ppb) standards, which are still being implemented across the country. Meanwhile, EPA reports national average ozone levels have fallen 33 percent since 1980 and 18 percent since 2000.

Against that backdrop, EPA staff reportedly is recommending a new primary ozone standard of between 60 and 70 ppb, which could put 94 percent of the country out of compliance – potentially stunting job creation and economic growth for little, if any, health benefit.

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Facts, Credible Research Undercut E15 Claims

air quality  e15  renewable fuel standard  epa  greenhouse gas emissions 

Mark Green

Mark Green
Posted September 12, 2014

One of the oft-repeated claims of ethanol producers is that higher-ethanol blend fuels like E15 are better for air quality than the E10 gasoline that’s the staple of the U.S. fuel supply. Short response: No. And while we’ve addressed the ethanol/air quality claim recently here and here, spurious assertions often have more lives than Lulu, my daughter’s cat. So let’s look at the facts and credible research again.

We’ll underscore “facts and credible research,” because an advocacy group is promoting a study on ethanol, air quality and potential cancer risks that isn’t an original study at all. Rather, it’s an overly simplistic exercise in data aggregation that ignores the confounding effects of different test procedures, laboratories and fuel properties. In other words, it’s a crummy analysis that would send real scientists running in the other way.

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Air Quality, Exports and Energy Infrastructure Needs

air quality  oil sands  exports  infrastructure 

Mark Green

Mark Green
Posted June 3, 2014

Reuters: Rising U.S. imports of crude oil from Canada's oil sands have not increased greenhouse gas emissions from the country's oil refineries because they have been offset by refining of cleaner domestic crudes, a report from a private sector think tank said on Monday.

The report, from industry consultants IHS CERA, comes as the Obama administration moves to cut greenhouse gas emissions from the U.S. power sector by 30 percent from 2005 levels by 2030, under new rules aimed at reducing America's longstanding reliance on burning coal to generate electricity.

The oil sands sector has faced frequent criticism from environmentalists concerned about greenhouse gas emissions. U.S. imports of carbon-rich Canadian oil-sands crudes grew by 900,000 barrels per day to more than 2 million bpd between 2005 and 2012, according to the IHS CERA report.

It said they did not result in higher greenhouse-gas intensity from the energy sector, however, as other crudes imported from abroad were supplanted by so-called tight oil from domestic shale-oil deposits.

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Energy Tomorrow Radio: Episode - 122 A Milestone for ULSD Fuel

air quality  diesel  emissions  energy policy  environmental protection agency  fuel  gasoline  refinery  ulsd  vehicle  highway travel  oil industry tax rate  truck  ultra low sulfur diesel 

Jane Van Ryan

Jane Van Ryan
Posted November 23, 2010

In today's episode, I interview Patrick Kelly, API's policy advisor for downstream fuels issues, about the completion of the transition from low sulfur diesel to Ultra-Low Sulfur Diesel (ULSD) fuel for highway travel.

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Is EPA Protecting Human Health?

air quality  energy policy  epa  air pollution  ozone standards 

Jane Van Ryan

Jane Van Ryan
Posted October 20, 2010

Whenever the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) issues new regulations, it usually includes information about the impact on human health. 

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