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Energy Tomorrow Blog

The Case for Expediting LNG Export Approvals

lng exports  trade  economic growth  emission reductions  security 

Mark Green

Mark Green
Posted September 21, 2016

With environmentalists attacking a provision in pending energy legislation that would boost the competitiveness of U.S. liquefied natural gas (LNG) exports, now’s a good time to review the reasons to expedite federal approval of LNG export projects in this country.

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Crude Exports and Consumer Benefits

crude oil exports  gasoline prices  consumers  domestic oil production  eia 

Mark Green

Mark Green
Posted September 9, 2016

Looking back, the weight of scholarship and analysis had predicted that, rather than cause higher pump prices here at home as some claimed, exporting domestic crude would put downward pressure on U.S. gasoline prices. In fact, that’s what we’re seeing – abundant crude oil supply benefiting American consumers. U.S. crude exports are part of that market dynamic – while also helping to support domestic production and strengthening America’s balance of trade.

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Energizing Wyoming

wyoming  Oil and Gas  emission reductions  exports  states2016 

Mark Green

Mark Green
Posted August 27, 2016

Wyoming ranks second among the 50 states in overall energy output, producing 9,362 trillion Btu in 2014, according to the U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA). Only Texas produced more energy.

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Energizing Oregon

oregon  vote4energy  natural gas  lng exports  states2016 

Mark Green

Mark Green
Posted August 20, 2016

Even in a big hydroelectric power-producing state like Oregon, petroleum-based fuels play an important energy role. Hydro accounted for 55.5 percent of the state’s net electricity generation in 2015 and supplied 34 percent of the energy Oregonians used in 2014 – the largest single energy source. Yet, combined fuels from oil and natural gas supplied 54.5 percent of the energy the state used. By itself, natural gas supplied 23 percent of the energy the state consumed.

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Competing to Win in Global LNG Export Market

liquefied natural gas  lng exports  trade  us energy security  fracking  infrastructure 

Mark Green

Mark Green
Posted August 2, 2016

Gaining strength is the argument that the United States should move as expeditiously as possible on liquefied natural gas (LNG) export infrastructure that would help secure America’s place in the emerging global LNG market.

The added heft is seen in two ways. First, the initial U.S. shipment of LNG passed through the newly expanded Panama Canal last week, underscoring a point made in this postthat the widened canal will shorten voyage times from U.S. LNG export facilities on the Gulf Coast to Asia and the western coast of South America, boosting the competitiveness of U.S. suppliers. Reduced voyage time means quicker turnaround times, leading to better service and a boost to U.S. competitiveness.

Secondly, an International Energy Agency (IEA) report projects the U.S. will become the world’s third-largest LNG supplier in five years, behind Qatar and Australia. 

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Panama Canal Expansion and U.S. LNG Exports

liquefied natural gas  lng exports  infrastructure  economic benefits  trade 

Mark Green

Mark Green
Posted July 5, 2016

newly expanded Panama Canal is open for business.

It’s noteworthy, as federal official say, that the enlarged canal can handle the vast majority of the world’s liquefied natural gas (LNG) tankers while significantly shortening travel time and transportation costs for U.S. LNG suppliers to key overseas markets. This is huge for U.S. LNG exports, offering another strong argument for swifter federal approval of pending LNG export projects.

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Why Leading the World in Oil, Natural Gas Output Matters

oil and natural gas production  security  energy exports  economic growth  climate 

Mark Green

Mark Green
Posted May 23, 2016

New figures from the U.S. Energy Information Administration show the United States remained the world’s No. 1 producer of oil and natural gas in 2015, a position the U.S. has held since 2012.

Several important points here, supporting the idea that U.S. world energy leadership is a big thing.

First, U.S. production of oil and natural gas grew last year despite continued low prices for crude last year. U.S. output of petroleum and other liquid fuels grew from 14.08 million barrels per day in 2014 to 15.04 million barrels per day in 2015. According to EIA, natural gas production rose from 74.89 billion cubic feet per day (bcf/d) in 2014 to 78.94 bcf/d in 2015, or about 13.99 million barrels of oil equivalent per day.

The second point is the vast majority of U.S. energy production is the result of safe and responsible hydraulic fracturing and modern horizontal drilling – fracking.

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EIA’s ‘Sneak Peek’ and Growing Energy Benefits

oil and natural gas production  security  economic growth  energy exports  climate  vote4energy 

Mark Green

Mark Green
Posted May 17, 2016

The United States in 2040 will be more energy self-sufficient, a net energy exporter and a lower source of energy-related carbon emissions as clean-burning natural gas becomes the dominant fuel for generating electricity. The leading energy source 24 years into the future – as they are now – will be oil and natural gas.  

So projects the U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) in an early look at select data from EIA’s Annual Energy Outlook 2016 report that’s scheduled for full release in July.

The main takeaway from EIA’s “sneak preview” is the importance of the U.S. energy revolution – primarily oil and natural gas developed from shale and other tight-rock formations using safe hydraulic fracturing and modern horizontal drilling. The United States is stronger now and will be in the future thanks to domestic energy from fracking.

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Amplifying the Pro-Infrastructure Message

infrastructure  oil and natural gas  pipelines  policy  lng exports 

Mark Green

Mark Green
Posted May 2, 2016

This wonderful domestic energy abundance and the global LNG market opportunities could be impacted by challenges facing infrastructure expansion here at home. America needs more energy infrastructure to move domestic supply to all areas of the country, for residential consumers, power generators and manufacturers. Yet, without stronger high-level backing, we could see these infrastructure needs delayed or rejected, as occurred last month with the proposed Constitution natural gas pipeline in New York.

Americans overwhelmingly support more energy infrastructure, and there appears to be bipartisan consensus for it in Congress. But infrastructure projects are being targeted by a vocal minority – even though increased domestic use of natural gas is the leading reason the United States is leading the world in reducing carbon emissions. A key going forward is gaining infrastructure support from the White House and the administration, said Marty Durbin, API’s executive director for market development.

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Matching Energy Policy with Energy Reality

natural gas production  infrastructure  lng exports  climate 

Mark Green

Mark Green
Posted April 28, 2016

Bringing home recognition of the U.S. energy renaissance and its benefits to policymakers in Washington is critically important. Sustaining and growing the domestic surge in oil and natural gas production depends on forward-looking leadership and sound policies.

No less critical is increasing Americans’ buy-in on the golden opportunity to foster economic growth well into the future, create jobs, produce consumer savings and strengthen U.S. standing in the world, all thanks to more home-grown energy – and all occurring as the United States leads the world in reducing carbon emissions.

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