Skip to main content

Energy Tomorrow Blog

North American Energy Fosters Growth, Security

oil and natural gas  us energy security  economic growth  canada  mexico 

Mark Green

Mark Green
Posted March 7, 2017

The North American energy market is progressing toward self-sufficiency in terms of liquid fuels, perhaps arriving in just a few years. According to EIA, the quantity of oil and other liquid energy sources produced by the three countries could outpace their liquid fuels consumption as soon as 2020. With liquid fuels production growing at a rate of 1 percent per year over the projection period while demand grows more slowly at 0.2 percent per year, supply can overtake demand, EIA figures (Table A21) show  – provided trade flows remain open.

More »

Safe Testing Advances U.S. Offshore Energy

offshore energy  oil and natural gas  gulf of mexico  seismic  safe operations 

Mark Green

Mark Green
Posted October 19, 2016

Advances in seismic imaging technology and data processing over the last decade have dramatically improved the industry’s ability to locate oil and natural gas offshore. And those energy sources – especially in the Gulf – can be harnessed to create hundreds of thousands of jobs, help American consumers and strengthen our national energy security.

More »

Energizing New Mexico

new mexico  oil and natural gas  fracking  vote4energy  states2016 

Mark Green

Mark Green
Posted September 9, 2016

Energy = opportunity – in New Mexico and across the U.S. Indeed, New Mexico is energy-rich, ranking sixth nationally in oil production and eighth in marketed natural gas output in 2015. Oil production has more than doubled since 2009, helped by development of the Permian Basin shale in southeastern New Mexico with hydraulic fracturing and horizontal drilling. 

More »

Video Tells Story of New Gulf Platform ‘Heidelberg’

offshore energy  offshore platform  oil and natural gas  gulf of mexico  spill 

Mark Green

Mark Green
Posted May 25, 2016

Heidelberg and other offshore production facilities are integral to U.S. energy security. The U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) estimates Gulf production will average 1.63 million barrels of oil per day (mb/d) this year and reach 1.91 mb/d by December next year, accounting for 18 percent and 21 percent of total U.S. crude oil production in 2016 and 2017, respectively.

Output from Heidelberg and other platforms reflects decisions made years ago – to buy leases and to invest in exploration and development. That’s why it’s critically important for robust planning now, starting with the government’s 2017-2022 offshore oil and natural gas leasing program that’s currently being put together by federal officials.

More »

Getting the Offshore Drilling Program Right

offshore drilling  oil and natural gas  boem  access  arctic  gulf of mexico  spill 

Mark Green

Mark Green
Posted May 11, 2016

Some points for the Senate Energy and Natural Resources Committee to consider when it meets next week to review the Obama administration’s proposed 2017-2022 program for offshore oil and natural gas leasing.

First, offshore oil and natural gas production historically has played a major role in overall U.S. energy output. In 2010 more than 30 percent of U.S. oil and 11 percent of U.S. natural gas was produced in the Gulf of Mexico. So, while it’s great that the U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) estimates  that Gulf production will increase to record high levels in 2017, every American must recognize that reaching record Gulf output next year would result because of leasing decisions made a decade or more ago.

In that context, let’s be clear: The federal offshore leasing program must reflect energy leadership and vision, and it must be focused on fostering opportunity. It must not reduce America’s offshore energy potential by keeping key offshore areas off the table for development.

More »

Offshore Energy Vital to Manufacturing, Energy Security

offshore energy development  offshore leasing  gulf of mexico  alaska  arctic  atlantic ocs  spill 

Jack Gerard

Jack Gerard
Posted March 23, 2016

The Obama administration’s decision last week to eliminate the Atlantic from the next federal offshore leasing plan is a step backward for American energy policy. Despite bipartisan support in Congress and from voters in coastal states, the administration is doubling down on a shortsighted policy that keeps 87 percent of federally controlled offshore acreage off limits to energy exploration.

Expanding access to America’s energy resources – both offshore and onshore – is vital to our future energy security and economic growth.

More »

Dialogue is Key to Getting Offshore Well Control Rule Right

analysis  gulf of mexico  center for offshore safety  offshore safety  offshore operations  industry standards  bop  bsee  job growth 

Mark Green

Mark Green
Posted September 14, 2015

Safe, responsible energy development in the Gulf of Mexico is vital to the U.S. economy and job growth, as well as U.S. energy and national security. Each of these points likely will come up during a U.S. House Natural Resources Committee hearing on the impact of federal policies on energy production and economic growth in the Gulf, Tuesday in New Orleans.

More »

Crude Swap and Economic, Environmental Benefits

analysis  energy exports  crude oil  mexico  economic benefits  refineries 

Mark Green

Mark Green
Posted August 31, 2015

More about last week’s Commerce Department decision to allow U.S. crude oil swaps with Mexico – basically, a positive step in the direction of lifting America’s 1970s-era ban on exporting domestic crude.

An analysis by the U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) says the exchange of light U.S. oil for heavier Mexican oil will generate economic and environmental benefits. The economic piece certainly is consistent with a number of studies that say lifting the ban and exporting domestic crude will generate broad benefits for our economy and savings at the pump for U.S. consumers, while spurring domestic production.

More »

Access, For a Robust Offshore Energy Sector

analysis  access  offshore energy  offshore leases  gulf of mexico  boem 

Mark Green

Mark Green
Posted August 20, 2015

Some observations on this week’s federal oil and natural gas lease sale in the Western Gulf of Mexico, reported with alarm by some media outlets because it wasn’t as large as other recent sales.

First, every lease sale is welcome. Access to U.S. offshore reserves represents opportunity for energy development, job creation, economic growth and greater American energy security. We need more offshore opportunities to support the strategic, long-term energy security of the United States – advanced by a robust offshore energy sector.

This week the Bureau of Ocean Energy Management (BOEM) announced five companies submitted 33 bids on 33 tracts in the Western Gulf, with high bids totaling about $22.7 million.

More »

A Step Forward on Oil Exports

analysis  mexico  crude oil  energy exports  trade  economic benefits  american petroleum institute 

Mark Green

Mark Green
Posted August 17, 2015

Late last week the Obama administration gave the go-ahead for limited domestic crude oil exports to Mexico, a positive move on oil exports – yet one that immediately underscores this question: Why stop there?

According to the Associated Press, license applications approved by the Commerce Department allow the exchange of similar amounts of U.S. and Mexican crude, a swap. The U.S. would send an as-yet unspecified amount of light crude to Mexico in exchange for heavier Mexican crude. AP:

While the Commerce Department simultaneously rejected other applications for crude exports that violated the ban, the move to allow trading with Mexico marked a significant shift and an additional sign that the Obama administration may be open to loosening the export ban. Exchanges of oil are one of a handful of exemptions permitted under the export ban put in place by Congress.

Two things: First, the arrangement with Mexico, while limited in scope, nonetheless is the administration affirming the inherent benefits of trade. The light crude in the deal represents some of the domestic oil that’s accumulating and trading at a discount to global prices, unable to reach the world market because it’s shut in by an outdated, anti-competitive oil exports ban. Second, the U.S. needs to go further.

More »