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Energy Tomorrow Blog

Energy Policies Should Help, Not Hurt America’s Resurgence

american energy  Energy Security  energy policy  fracking  exports  keystone xl pipeline  taxes 

Mary Leshper

Mary Schaper
Posted January 23, 2014

What The Captain & Tennille Teach Us About Energy Policy

Forbes: Love apparently didn’t keep the ’70s pop duo Captain & Tennille together.Toni Tennille has filed for divorce from Daryl Dragon after 39 years of marriage. Just as the pair’s most famous standard now rings false, so does our 1970′s notion of energy security. For the past 40 years, U.S. energy policy has been married to the idea of scarcity. Following the oil embargoes of the 1970s, we built policies, from export bans to ethanol mandates, based on the idea that we would forever be at the mercy of other oil-producing nations.

The hydraulic fracturing boom, however, has changed all that. North America is undergoing an energy renaissance. Domestic crude oil production has reached parity with imports, and the International Energy Agency predicts the U.S. may become the world’s largest energy producer as early as next year. Yet our policies remain stuck in the dark ages of scarcity. Lawmakers on both sides of the aisle are resisting efforts to lift the 1970s-era ban on crude exports, citing issues of “energy security.”

As Sen. Edward Markey, D-Mass., told the Wall Street Journal: “If we overturn decades of law and send our oil to China and other markets, oil companies might make more money per barrel, but it will be American consumers and our national security that will pay the price.”

There’s a difference between ensuring our energy security and hoarding resources. With our newfound abundance, security comes through continued development of domestic reserves.

Read morehttp://onforb.es/KMM7kV

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Big Myths on Oil, Natural Gas and Taxes

taxes  taxes impact on business  oil and natural gas development  economic policy 

Stephen Comstock

Stephen Comstock
Posted January 21, 2014

A new year unfortunately means the same old tired arguments from folks seeking higher punitive taxes on America’s oil and natural gas companies, in this case in the form of a post from the Center for American Progress (CAP), which seeks to simplify the complexity of comprehensive tax reform down to “end special tax breaks for the five biggest oil companies.” So what are these “special” tax breaks they want to end?

Well, the first identified by CAP is the “Section 199 deduction” created in 2004 to spur employment in U.S. manufacturing and is available for all U.S. taxpayers who manufacture in the U.S.  So, not special for oil and natural gas companies, and in fact oil and natural gas companies are already singled out for reduced used of the deduction, compared to other manufacturers. The second is the foreign tax credit deduction, which is designed to minimize double taxation and is available to all U.S. companies with operations overseas. So again, not special for oil and natural gas companies. Lastly, CAP wants to end the intangible drilling costs deduction (IDCs), which is a cost-recovery mechanism for oil and natural gas exploration and production expenses that has existed since 1913.  While drilling costs are unique to drillers, the deduction of costs is similar to cost-recovery provisions provided to every business, so not special, and as a bonus, IDCs are also not a tax break, as drillers pay the full amount of taxes that are owed. 

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America’s Shale Success Story

hydraulic fracturing  fracking  exports  taxes  american energy 

Mary Leshper

Mary Schaper
Posted January 13, 2014

For Some Counties, Natural Gas Drilling Brings a Windfall

San Francisco Gate:  PITTSBURGH (AP) — Even as some cities around the nation have voted to ban fracking for natural gas, other rural areas are quietly embracing the boom by allowing drilling under public parks and land and reaping millions in royalties.

In Washington County, just outside Pittsburgh, officials say the unexpected revenue stream is letting them make improvements that otherwise might not have been possible.

"Having that funding source has been a tremendous boom to us," said Lisa Cessna, the executive director of the local planning commission. The county has received about $10 million directly from drilling companies since 2007, and royalty payments are still coming in. That's helped build fishing piers, playgrounds and walking trails.

Read more: http://bit.ly/1eP9ofQ

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The Gift of Petroleum

american energy  jobs  Economy  Environment  hydraulic fracturing  taxes  tax revenue 

Mary Leshper

Mary Schaper
Posted December 23, 2013

State Already Taxes Oil in many Ways

San Francisco Chronicle (Catherine Reheis-Boyd): Tom Steyer, the San Francisco billionaire environmentalist, has launched a campaign to increase taxes on energy production in California. He thinks oil companies are allowed to "siphon California resources without providing any meaningful return to Californians."

Beginning an education campaign on inaccurate claims doesn't bode well for the quality of the educational experience.

To claim Californians receive no meaningful return for the oil we produce is puzzling. Oil companies in California generate $6 billion in tax revenues for state and local governments, according to an analysis by Purvin & Gertz in 2011. While it's true California does not have an oil severance tax per se, California taxes oil companies and oil production in a variety of other ways.

Read more: http://bit.ly/1kzQ4aP

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Tax Hike Plan Could Dim One of Economy's Bright Lights

intangible drilling costs  lifo  taxes on oil companies  government revenues 

Mark Green

Mark Green
Posted December 17, 2013

Last month we made some points on a Senate proposal that would impact America’s oil and natural gas industry with higher taxes and costs. Research has shown that delaying industry’s ability to write off intangible drilling costs likely would mean fewer wells drilled, lost jobs and lower energy production. Doing away with the “last-in, last-out” (LIFO) accounting method used by a number of energy companies would require them to redirect cash or sell assets to cover tax payments.

Now API has been joined by more than a dozen other organizations – representing energy producers, refiners, supporting servicers, equipment manufacturers, marketers and retailers – in challenging proposals that could hinder an industry that already sends $85 million a day to the U.S. Treasury.

In a letter to members of Congress the groups say that while efforts to make the tax code less complicated and more competitive are good, raising energy taxes and increasing costs will work against greater industry investment and activity that would provide broad benefit to the U.S. economy.

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Americans Clear on Higher Energy Taxes

access  taxes and revenue  production  job creation 

Mark Green

Mark Green
Posted October 29, 2013

Here’s what Americans are thinking about tax reform discussions that potentially could include hiking taxes on U.S. oil and natural gas companies, according to a new Harris Interactive poll

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Do You Know the Drill on Federal Revenues from Oil, Natural Gas Development?

offshore development  onshore leases  government revenues  royalties  taxes 

Mark Green

Mark Green
Posted October 17, 2013

With the ongoing budget debate in Washington serving as backdrop, let’s review ways America’s oil and natural gas industry generates revenue for our government – and the smart path to increasing that contribution in coming years.

First, our industry currently supplies $85 million a day in revenue to the U.S. Treasury via income taxes, royalties, rents and other fees. Second, industry is paying its fair share and more with an effective tax rate of 44.6 percent averaged over 2007-2012 – compared to 37.7 percent for retail, 25.6 percent for computer and peripherals and 21.3 percent for pharmaceuticals. And it could deliver more through increased domestic production made possible by greater access to U.S. reserves.

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Good News for American Energy

american energy  hydraulic fracturing  fracking  water contamination  taxes  keystone xl 

Mary Leshper

Mary Schaper
Posted October 8, 2013

Texas Continues to Lead the Shale Oil and Natural Gas Revolution

Forbes: Almost lost in all the news about the federal government “shutdown” (which has somehow left 83% of the government funded and functioning) over the last week are several new reports regarding the ongoing massive oil and natural gas Shale Revolution in the United States, and the role Texas is playing in making it happen…

When one includes condensate production from natural gas wells, Texas produced over 2.6 million BOPD in July, fully 35% of the nation’s petroleum production.  Just a little more than 2 years ago, in April 2011, Texas’s daily oil production was 1.3 million BOPD, accounting for just 20% of total US production.  That’s a phenomenal increase in only two years.  The state’s current production level would rank it 13th among all countries on earth, and the rate of increase will almost certainly move the state into the top ten within the next 12 months.

 

Read more: http://onforb.es/18N2qWO

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VIDEO: Fair Tax Policy to Sustain Energy Investments

intangible drilling costs  investments  taxes 

Mark Green

Mark Green
Posted September 18, 2013

Check out the video below of a Fox Business Network interview with API President and CEO Jack Gerard on the tax reform climate in Washington that has some talking about raising taxes on energy companies. The ability to recover the costs associated with finding oil and natural gas in a timely way through the Intangible Drilling Costs provision is especially critical to continuing investments in energy development, Gerard says.

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More Energy Development, More Energy Benefits

income  jobs  taxes  lng exports  hydraulic fracturing 

Mary Leshper

Mary Schaper
Posted September 10, 2013

Fracking, the Poor and Adding to Americans’ Disposable Income

Wall Street Journal (editorial): Last week we reported on a study showing that the U.S. oil and natural gas revolution may be the country's best antipoverty program, and the evidence keeps coming. A new report from IHS Global Insight estimates that fracking added the equivalent of a cool $1,200 to real household disposable income on average in 2012.

Lower costs for raw materials were passed on to consumers via lower home heating and electricity bills and lower prices for other goods and services. Wages also increased from a surge in industrial activity. On present trend, IHS predicts that unconventional oil and gas will contribute more than $2,000 a year by 2015 and $3,500 by 2025.

Overall the industry lifted economic growth by $283 billion last year.

Read more (subscription publication): http://on.wsj.com/13GJtDS

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