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Energy Tomorrow Blog

Pennsylvania Energy Needs More Pipelines

pennsylvania  pipelines  infrastructure  natural gas  marcellus 

Reid Porter

Reid Porter
Posted September 30, 2016

The need to continue to safely and responsibly develop and utilize American-produced energy has never been more important. In Pennsylvania, nothing could be more critical to the commonwealth, its residents and its business community. Additional pipeline infrastructure is the key to helping Pennsylvania fulfill the promise of its energy economy.

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Energizing Illinois

illinois  infrastructure  refineries  pipelines  vote4energy  states2016 

Mark Green

Mark Green
Posted September 27, 2016

In the heart of the U.S. industrial and agricultural belt, Illinois’ significant energy contribution is its infrastructure. The state hosts four crude oil refineries with a capacity of more than 962,000 barrels per day, making Illinois the largest refining state in the Midwest, according to the U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA). The state ranked fourth in the U.S. in refining as of January 2015.

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Energizing New Hampshire

new hampshire  pipelines  natural gas  electricity  vote4energy  states2016 

Mark Green

Mark Green
Posted September 21, 2016

New Hampshire is without oil and natural gas reserves of its own. Nuclear accounted for about 47 percent of the state’s net electricity generation last year, with natural gas supplying about 30 percent. But since that gas – as well as natural gas for home heating – must come from elsewhere, the state (and the rest of New England for that matter) is engaged in an important conversation over ensuring adequate pipeline capacity to meet home, commercial and industrial needs.

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Energizing Missouri

missouri  pipelines  infrastructure  vote4energy  states2016 

Mark Green

Mark Green
Posted September 20, 2016

Located in the heart of the country, Missouri is the crossroads for more than two dozen pipelines that deliver crude oil, petroleum products, natural gas and natural gas liquids from producers to markets and, ultimately, consumers. Though the state produced only 150,000 barrels of oil last year, it remains a key component in America’s energy mix because of the infrastructure it hosts.

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Pipelines For Energy and… Beer?

infrastructure  pipelines 

Michael Tadeo

Michael Tadeo
Posted September 19, 2016

The benefits of pipeline infrastructure are being felt in one small Belgian city. Only get this: The deliverable is beer.

The Halve Maan Brewery in Bruges recently opened a beer pipeline connecting the brewery in the center of the town to a bottling plant about 2 miles away. The $4.5 million pipeline that took five months to build can deliver 12,000 bottles of beer an hour to the bottling plant. Not only will the pipeline increase efficiency in delivering this product to market, but its multi-million dollar construction likely provided an economic boost to the area.

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Dakota Access Pipeline in Human, Economic Terms

north dakota  pipelines  economic benefits  infrastructure 

Mark Green

Mark Green
Posted September 14, 2016

Each job is the economic lifeline for an individual and/or family, thousands of them. Sales tax revenues reflect economic activity along the construction corridor that benefits local businesses of all kinds. Property taxes typically support schools, hospitals, emergency services and other vital public services and facilities. If you’re a resident of one of the states traversed by the DAPL, the project is valuable to your community, to you and your neighbors – and the administration’s attempt to contravene the regular, lawful order puts that value at risk.

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Energizing Massachusetts

massachusetts  infrastructure  natural gas pipelines  states2016  vote4energy 

Mark Green

Mark Green
Posted September 3, 2016

The key energy issue in Massachusetts, like a number of other New England states, is infrastructure. Massachusetts doesn’t produce natural gas and oil itself, so the state must bring these fuels in from elsewhere to heat homes and generate electricity for residences and businesses.

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Energy Costs, Natural Gas and Infrastructure

natural gas  electricity  economic benefits  infrastructure  fracking  pipelines 

Mark Green

Mark Green
Posted July 14, 2016

CNBC has put out its annual ranking of America’s top states for business, an analysis based on a number of things including metrics for workforce, infrastructure, access to capital and quality of life. Another of those metrics, cost of living, caught our eye because energy was part of the calculation. Indeed, in CNBC’s ranking of the country’s 10 most expensive states to live in, the cost of energy to residents a key factor.

Five members of that dubious top 10 are New York, Connecticut, Massachusetts, Rhode Island and New Hampshire, and energy costs there are higher than they need to be. According to the U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA), those states and neighbors Maine and Vermont all had costs for residential electricity and natural gas that exceeded national averages this past winter. Of course, these states are located in a part of the country where more energy infrastructure (see previous posts here and here) could positively impact energy costs.  

A couple of charts show the cost being borne by consumers in those states, in part, because there’s inadequate natural gas pipeline infrastructure to meet home heating and power generation needs during peak winter months.

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Just Say ‘Yes’ on Natural Gas, Infrastructure

natural gas  pipelines  climate  infrastructure  costs 

Mark Green

Mark Green
Posted July 1, 2016

When you see the significant economic, consumer and climate benefits to the U.S. from increased  use of natural gas, it’s quite a puzzle when some won’t take “yes” for an answer – yes to lower energy costs, yes to infrastructure jobs, yes to carbon emissions reductions. Unfortunately for Massachusetts residents, that’s the path the state legislature appears to be taking. More below. First, a review of how clean-burning natural gas is making life better across the rest of the country.

Let’s start with reduced household energy costs, which are helping to lower Americans’ cost of living, according to the U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA). In constant 2015 dollars, EIA says average annual energy costs per household peaked at about $5,300 in 2008 then declined 14.1 percent in 2014.

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Energy Infrastructure Delivers Jobs, Affordable Energy

jobs  infrastructure  natural gas pipelines  investment  economic growth 

Jack Gerard

Jack Gerard
Posted May 18, 2016

The average American household has saved almost $750 in annual energy costs compared to 2008, according to recent data released by the U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA). Greater availability of domestic oil and natural gas, made possible by hydraulic fracturing, has helped drive down prices for gasoline, electricity and home heating.

Keeping affordable, reliable energy moving to families and businesses requires infrastructure -- pipelines, storage, processing, rail and maritime resources. Candidates often make infrastructure development a centerpiece of their economic plans, promising to create jobs and modernize the U.S. transportation system by improving roads, bridges, rail networks and airports. Energy infrastructure should be on that list. Shovel-ready projects abound in the energy sector.

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