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Energy Tomorrow Blog

The Collision Between U.S.-China Trade Policy and LNG Exports

liquid natural gas  lng exports  trade  china 

Dean Foreman

Dean Foreman
Posted January 14, 2019

The U.S. set new natural gas and oil production and export records in the fourth quarter of 2018, even as the administration's trade war with China continued to escalate. As 2018 trade figures have become clear, an emerging consequence was decreased U.S. liquefied natural gas (LNG) cargoes to China, which fell by around 20 percent from 2017, as these shipments became subject to a 10 percent Chinese import tariff effective Sept. 24.

Americans should care about the health of these U.S. natural gas exports because growing markets for domestic natural gas can generate economic growth at home by helping stimulate additional natural gas development, more than is needed to supply domestic demand; attract multi-billion-dollar U.S. investments in infrastructure – including pipelines, natural gas processing, LNG liquefaction, export facilities and shipping – and the high-quality jobs and wages that accompany these; and more.


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U.S. Grows as an Energy Superpower

oil and natural gas  us energy security  economic growth  production 

Dean Foreman

Dean Foreman
Posted December 20, 2018

Remarkable production figures in API’s latest Monthly Statistical Report illustrate the breadth and depth of the U.S. energy revolution and translate into economic growth and increased U.S. security in the world. In the past, U.S. production data sometimes included an asterisk – leading in some scenarios but not others. The figures above pretty much eliminate the “ifs,” “ands” or “buts” associated with any discussion of U.S. energy muscularity.  

Consider this: U.S. production of NGLs – liquid fuels produced with natural gas such as ethane, propane, butane and others – makes the U.S. natural gas industry the world’s No. 4 oil producer (behind the U.S., Russia and Saudi Arabia). 

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On Cellulosic Ethanol, Hope Still Outpacing Reality

cellulosic ethanol  consumers  renewable fuel standard  epa 

Dean Foreman

Dean Foreman
Posted December 11, 2018

As debates continue over the Renewable Fuel Standard (RFS) and its ethanol mandates, let’s remember that when the RFS was enacted more than a decade ago it was supposed to jumpstart a commercially viable cellulosic ethanol industry – ethanol made from the leaves, stems and other fibrous parts of a plant.

This has not happened. Far from it. Despite increased mandates under the RFS for cellulosic ethanol, those mandates have dwarfed actual production. The result is a costly proposition for American consumers and an object lesson on what can happen when government tries to use policy to favor a certain technology. Let’s explore the issue.


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Straight Talk on Electric Vehicles

electric vehicles  consumers  subsidies  tax credit  emissions 

Dean Foreman

Dean Foreman
Posted November 30, 2018

With the Edison Electric Institute celebrating 1 million electric vehicles on U.S. roads with a forum event in Washington, D.C., let’s talk, again, about some EV realities – which is important as the buzz around EVs grows. Let’s discuss subsidies, real consumer costs, emissions and batteries.


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Explaining Natural Gas Price Fluctuations

consumers  natural gas  energy costs  prices 

Dean Foreman

Dean Foreman
Posted November 21, 2018

Recent headlines on natural gas prices may leave Americans feeling whipsawed by marketplace fluctuations (see here and here). So, let’s look at what’s been going on with natural gas this year. But first, four points to keep in mind:

Affordable natural gas has saved the average household more than $100 per year in recent years; (2) most consumers are typically insulated from wholesale price variations – the focus of recent news coverage; (3) price increases this month to date are mainly the result of lower inventories coupled with cold weather forecasts that, of course, can change suddenly; and (4) recent price movements in natural gas futures are well within the ranges seen during the resurgence in U.S. energy production

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‘Powering America Past Impossible’ Primer Launches

power-past-impossible  oil and natural gas  economic growth  emission reductions  consumers 

Dean Foreman

Dean Foreman
Posted November 20, 2018

Follow this link to “Powering Past Impossible,” API’s primer on important natural gas and oil industry issues – spanning global economics and energy, natural gas and oil markets and key factors to sustaining and growing the U.S. energy revolution. Eight important takeaways from the primer follow.

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Correlation Grows Between Financial Markets, Oil Prices

crude markets  crude oil prices  consumers  investments  finance 

Dean Foreman

Dean Foreman
Posted November 15, 2018

Earlier this year we pointed out that a roller coaster of emerging economic factors could affect oil markets and, ultimately, consumers – and we were correct.

Rising interest rates, trade and tariff disputes, near decade-high U.S. dollar appreciation and potential financial market uncertainties have become pronounced over the past few months, affecting global crude oil markets and producing the strongest correlation between financial markets and oil prices in years

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New Marine Fuel Regulations and Potential Consumer Impact

fuel  regulation  consumers 

Dean Foreman

Dean Foreman
Posted October 30, 2018

There has been a recent flurry of news about whether the Trump administration will succeed in easing the rollout of new international rules to power commercial ships with environmentally cleaner fuels. 

The main fear is the change of rules could drive up demand and prices for low-sulfur fuels like diesel fuel – and ultimately the costs to consumers and businesses for their motor fuels, transportation, and everything that depends on them.


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Trade Policy Impacts on U.S. Energy Becoming Visible

crude oil exports  production  trade  monthly-stats-report 

Dean Foreman

Dean Foreman
Posted September 20, 2018

In API’s latest Industry Outlook and Monthly Statistical Report, we have shifted from recognizing risks on the horizon to having a line of sight on some of them.  The effects of trade disputes in particular have become tangible.

Most notably, at the same time as the U.S. celebrated another new record for crude oil production of 10.8 million barrels per day (mb/d), U.S. petroleum exports decreased by 1.3 mb/d over the past two months.  

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Natural Gas Market Growth and Keeping a Level Playing Field

natural gas  electric-grid  coal  nuclear  consumers 

Dean Foreman

Dean Foreman
Posted August 23, 2018

Domestic natural gas abundance – safely developed with modern hydraulic fracturing and high-tech horizontal drilling – has benefitted consumers and the economy while reducing greenhouse gas emissions and helping make our air cleaner.

Sustaining and growing those benefits largely depends on market growth for natural gas – to add production that production must have new and/or growing markets to supply. Policy can affect the potential for that market growth. The U.S. Energy Department’s (DOE) continued push to bail out failing coal and nuclear plants is a prime example.


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