Skip to main content

Energy Tomorrow Blog

White House Politics Versus The American People

crude oil exports  economic growth  jobs  white house  ghg mitigation technologies  oil and natural gas development 

Kyle Isakower

Kyle Isakower
Posted October 8, 2015

These things are true:

  • The U.S. gets the majority of its energy from oil and natural gas, and is projected to continue to do so for decades.
  • Since 2005 U.S. production of natural gas is up 43 percent.
  • Since 2008 U.S. production of crude oil is up 88 percent.
  • U.S. air quality continues to improve, with concentrations of carbon monoxide down 60 percent, ozone down 18 percent, lead 87 percent, nitrogen dioxide 43 percent, particulate matter 35 percent and sulfur dioxide 62 percent since 2000.
  • The federal U.S. budget deficit for FY2015 was $435 billion.
  • The U.S. trade deficit rose in August as exports hit a three-year low.
  • Since 2008 our working age population has grown by over 16 million, while employment is up 8.5 million, leaving the U.S. at odds with trends in other countries.
  • U.S. poverty and wages are stagnant, and it is getting harder for people to move beyond a minimum-wage job.
  • Americans' trust in the federal government's ability to handle domestic problems has reached a new low.

These things are true, and thus, when presented with bipartisan legislation to reduce consumer fuel costs and the trade deficit while increasing U.S. investment, domestic crude oil production, GDP and government revenues and creating good paying jobs – all via U.S. crude oil exports – the White House obviously had no choice but to … threaten to veto it.


More »

The Crude Oil Exports Vote

crude oil exports  crude oil production  economic growth  jobs 

Mark Green

Mark Green
Posted October 7, 2015

The U.S. House has an important vote scheduled for Friday on legislation that would lift the 1970s-era ban on domestic crude oil exports. It’s an historic chance for U.S. policymakers to affirm that America’s energy picture is fundamentally and dramatically improved from where it was four decades ago – thanks to surging domestic production that has made the United States the world’s No. 1 producer of oil and natural gas.

It boils down to this: A vote for the bill would be a vote for U.S. jobseconomic growthtrade benefits  and strengthened American security. It would be a vote for U.S. consumers and American global competitiveness. It would be a vote for America’s friends abroad, who see U.S. energy as a global supply diversifier and stabilizer. As one ally said earlier this year, with U.S. oil exports the “world itself will be a … safer place.”

More »

The Crude Oil Exports Vote

crude oil exports  domestic oil production  economic growth  jobs  Energy Security 

Mark Green

Mark Green
Posted October 7, 2015

The U.S. House has an important vote scheduled for Friday on legislation that would lift the 1970s-era ban on domestic crude oil exports. It’s an historic chance for U.S. policymakers to affirm that America’s energy picture is fundamentally and dramatically improved from where it was four decades ago – thanks to surging domestic production that has made the United States the world’s No. 1 producer of oil and natural gas.

It boils down to this: A vote for the bill would be a vote for U.S. jobs, economic growth, trade benefits  and strengthened American security. It would be a vote for U.S. consumers and American global competitiveness. It would be a vote for America’s friends abroad, who see U.S. energy as a global supply diversifier and stabilizer. As one ally said earlier this year, with U.S. oil exports the “world itself will be a … safer place.”

More »

Hillary, Politics and The Pipeline

analysis  keystone xl pipeline  Hillary Clinton  crude oil  Jack Gerard  oil sands  canada 

Mark Green

Mark Green
Posted September 23, 2015

At some point during the past seven years the Keystone XL pipeline ceased to exist only as an important project of energy infrastructure – one that could generate jobs, economic growth and strengthen U.S. energy security – and became a symbol for a narrow ideological agenda, a political football the White House has endlessly punted around to suit its own political needs. Little surprise, then, that Hillary Clinton has decided to join in the KXL kicking.

More »

Crude Oil Exports, Imports and Fig Leaves

analysis  energy exports  crude oil  oil production  economic benefits 

Mark Green

Mark Green
Posted September 18, 2015

First, they said it was about protecting consumers. Opponents of lifting the U.S. ban on crude oil exports claimed that allowing domestic crude to reach the global market would negatively impact Americans at the gas pump. But every major economic study looking at the issue has blown away that fig leaf.

The studies – from Brookings Energy Security Initiative to IHS to the U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) – estimate that U.S. oil exports would put downward pressure on U.S. gasoline prices, benefiting American consumers.

There have been other fig leaves.

Exports opponents say America shouldn’t export crude as long as our country is an oil importer. They also say the U.S. should isolate its crude from the global marketplace for national security reasons and that for those reasons oil should be treated differently than other U.S. commodities that are freely traded. These, too, have been blown away by the facts and sound economic analysis.

More »

Lift the Oil Export Ban, Strengthen America

analysis  energy exports  crude oil  economic benefits  american petroleum institute 

Mark Green

Mark Green
Posted September 15, 2015

So here we are: Legislation that would end America’s 40-year-old ban on the export of domestic crude oil is moving through Congress – and better, there’s bipartisan momentum behind it.

Resistance to lifting the crude exports ban has no credible footholds – reflecting the breadth of the economic analysis supporting exports. There’s also the realization by most Americans that our country’s ongoing energy revolution has pretty much dashed the 1970s-era justifications for excluding American energy from the global marketplace, where it could be positively affecting global crude markets, stimulating production here at home and providing real energy aid to America’s allies.

More »

Live Event: Impacts of the Crude Oil Exports Ban

analysis  energy exports  crude oil  economic benefits  production  american petroleum institute  Jack Gerard 

Mark Green

Mark Green
Posted September 15, 2015

Join us Tuesday morning for a live event from Washington, D.C., that will explore the impacts of America’s crude oil exports ban on our economy, national security, foreign policy, the environment, consumers and more.

The event, hosted by National Journal and sponsored by API, is scheduled to begin at 8:45 a.m. API President and CEO Jack Gerard will introduce the event, followed by remarks from U.S. Sens. Heidi Heitkamp and John Hoeven, both of North Dakota, and Ed Markey of Massachusetts. 

More »

Progress on Crude Oil Exports

analysis  energy exports  crude oil  gasoline prices  congress  american petroleum institute 

Mark Green

Mark Green
Posted September 10, 2015

An important step forward this week for legislation to end America’s outdated, 1970s-era ban on domestic oil exports: passage of the bill by a U.S. House subcommittee. Next a full committee vote and, perhaps before too long, a vote by the entire House. Yet, challenges remain.

No doubt the full Energy and Commerce Committee debate will be more vigorous. But that doesn’t diminish this week’s historic progress on lifting the export ban – a true relic from America’s energy past.  “This has been a long day coming,” said Rep. Joe Barton of Texas, the bill’s author.

As Barton explained, we’re at this point largely because of America’s energy revolution – the surge in domestic oil and natural gas production resulting from American innovation, technology, shale reserves and hydraulic fracturing and horizontal drilling.

More »

New Ads: Economic, Security Reasons to Lift Crude Exports Ban

analysis  energy exports  crude oil  economic growth  american petroleum institute  gasoline prices 

Mark Green

Mark Green
Posted September 9, 2015

API has a pair of new ads that drive home the economic and national security reasons for lifting America’s 1970s-era ban on exporting domestic crude oil

Here’s the national security spotClick here for the ad that underscores the job and economic reasons for lifting the ban. 

The television and online campaign launched this week in a dozen states – including Colorado, Florida, Illinois, Pennsylvania and Virginia – and the District of Columbia. The campaign is part of a broader push emphasizing the importance of updating U.S. energy policies to reflect America’s rise as a global energy superpower.

More »

Momentum for Crude Oil Exports

analysis  energy exports  crude oil  congress  american petroleum institute  domestic oil production 

Mark Green

Mark Green
Posted September 8, 2015

It looks like last week’s U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) report pointing out the benefits of exporting domestic crude oil is pushing Washington policymakers closer to ending the 1970s-era ban on exports. McClatcheyDC reports:

Momentum is growing to lift the 40-year ban on exporting U.S. oil to foreign nations, with a federal report concluding that doing so wouldn’t raise gasoline prices. Congress could vote on proposals when it returns from its summer vacation after Labor Day. Rep. Joe Barton, R-Texas, said he has “green lights” from the House Republican leadership, and is confident the House will pass a bill on ending the ban this fall. “It is up to this Congress to examine the issue and move towards a better policy that reflects the reality of America today, not the America of 1975,” Barton said in an email.

It may be that EIA’s report marks “critical mass” in terms of how much research backing crude exports is needed to move the needle in Washington – saying, as a number of previous studies projected – that exporting U.S. oil won’t negatively affect consumers and will spur domestic production. EIA’s report addresses the White House’s chief concern, about the impact of a policy change on U.S. energy prices. And this week an important House subcommittee is scheduled to vote on legislation that would lift the export ban.  

More »