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Energy Tomorrow Blog

No More Excuses on Keystone XL, and More

keystone xl pipeline  oil sands  Economy  Energy Security  Environment  jobs  trade  lng exports 

Mary Leshper

Mary Schaper
Posted January 9, 2015

The Hill: The Nebraska Supreme Court on Friday struck down a lower court's challenge to the controversial Keystone XL pipeline, handing a key victory to proponents of the project. The decision overturns a lower court's ruling that had sided with landowners challenging Keystone's path through Nebraska. The lower court said a 2012 law that allowed Nebraska Gov. Dave Heineman (R) to greenlight the route was against the state's constitution.

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New Year Brings Energy Policies into Focus

energy policy  Energy 101  trade  Economy  imports  lng exports  keystone xl pipeline  soae 

Mary Leshper

Mary Schaper
Posted January 7, 2015

Wall Street Journal: The U.S. trade gap narrowed in November to its lowest level in nearly a year, reflecting gyrations in the oil market that mask strong underlying domestic demand for foreign goods. The trade deficit fell 7.7% to a seasonally adjusted $39 billion in November from the prior month’s deficit of $42.25 billion, the Commerce Department said Wednesday. The reading marks the smallest deficit since December 2013. October’s deficit was revised from an initially reported $43.43 billion. The narrower trade gap could support fourth-quarter economic growth. Barclays lifted it forecast fourth-quarter gross domestic product forecast to a 3.5% gain from a 2.7% advance following the trade report. Credit Suisse moved its estimate to a 3.2% advance from 2.9%.

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Consumers Benefiting from More American Energy

Economy  jobs  american energy  fracking  lng exports  exports 

Mary Leshper

Mary Schaper
Posted December 16, 2014

EIA Today in Energy: The average U.S. household is expected to spend about $550 less on gasoline in 2015 compared with 2014, as annual motor fuel expenditures are on track to fall to their lowest level in 11 years. Lower fuel expenditures are attributable to a combination of falling retail gasoline prices and more fuel-efficient cars and trucks that reduce the number of gallons used to travel a given distance. Household gasoline costs are forecast to average $1,962 next year, assuming that EIA's price forecast, which is highly uncertain, is realized. Should the forecast be realized, motor fuel expenditures (gasoline and motor oil) in 2015 would be below $2,000 for the first time since 2009, according to EIA's December 2014 Short-Term Energy Outlook(STEO).

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An Economic Boost, Thanks to American Energy

Economy  jobs  american energy  fracking  lng exports  exports 

Mary Leshper

Mary Schaper
Posted December 15, 2014

Penn Live (Raymond Keating): At this weekend's annual Pennsylvania Society Holiday Dinner in New York City, I suspect energy policy will be a frequent topic of discussion — as it should rightfully be. From Benjamin Franklin's first experiments with electricity in Philadelphia to the energy revolution taking place in the Marcellus Shale natural gas play, the Keystone State has led the way in developing resources to the benefit of all Pennsylvanians and the entire nation.

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Maryland and Fracking

maryland  safe operations  hydraulic fracturing  horizontal drilling  fracking  natural gas development  shale energy  tax revenues  royalty payments  lng exports 

Mark Green

Mark Green
Posted December 2, 2014

Maryland Gov. Martin O’Malley’s recent announcement – that he plans to lift the state’s three-year moratorium on hydraulic fracturing, possibly clearing the way for future natural gas development – is potentially good news for the state, its citizens and America’s broader energy picture.

A new report by the state’s Department of the Environment and the Department of Natural Resources details some of the possible benefits:Garrett County in western Maryland could gain as many as 2,425 new jobs while realizing $3.6 million in tax revenues and $13.5 million in severance tax revenues.Neighboring Allegany County could see as many as 908 new jobs, $1.8 million in tax revenues and $2.3 million in severance tax revenues over 10 years. “Royalty payments to the owners and lessors of mineral rights could provide significant income,” the report says.

Significantly, the department concludes what a number of other states have found and are demonstrating – that advanced hydraulic fracturing and horizontal drilling to develop natural gas and oil from shale and other tight-rock formations can be conducted safely and efficiently.

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Energy Critical to Growing Economy, Creating American Jobs

Economy  american energy  jobs  energy  keystone xl pipeline  exports  fracking  lng exports 

Mary Leshper

Mary Schaper
Posted November 21, 2014

USA Today (Manhattan Institute’s Mark Mills): When the newly elected Congress convenes in January, energy will be a priority. In fact energy is the "foundation" action item according to the just-released roadmap from Speaker of the House John Boehner. So this is a particularly good time to map out just how different the energy world is today, and will be in the future.

 

Four decades ago, when America's extant energy policy paradigm was forged, the U.S. was the world's fastest growing major energy user in an environment of resource dependency and depletion. The facts have since flipped: America is now the fastest growing energy producer, while nearly all net new demand takes place elsewhere.

 

In this context, consider the implications for America, and the world, of five key numbers.

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Americans Win with American Energy

american energy  Economy  jobs  lng exports  fracking  pennsylvania 

Mary Leshper

Mary Schaper
Posted November 17, 2014

The Economist: To find out how much energy security has mattered in the Pacific’s recent history, ask the Japanese. At the museum of the Yasukuni Shrine in Tokyo, which honours the country’s war dead (sometimes controversially), an exhibit suggests, with a jarring note of self-justification, that an American naval blockade against Japanese oil imports in 1941 triggered the Pacific war.

Seventy years later a tsunami that swooshed in from the Pacific and knocked out the Fukushima Daiichi nuclear power station led to the closure of Japan’s 54 nuclear reactors. Parts of the country, which is a greedy consumer of electricity, were left practically powerless. Huge tankers full of natural gas, heading for terminals dotted along Japan’s Pacific coastline, eventually got the country up and running again. In 2012 Japan consumed 37% of the world’s liquefied natural gas (LNG).

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Falling LNG Imports, America’s LNG Exports Opportunity

lng exports  natural gas development  economic growth  job creation  trade  shale energy 

Mark Green

Mark Green
Posted November 13, 2014

A good deal of the buzz generated by America’s ongoing energy revolution has centered on the way surging domestic production is changing the crude oil imports picture. No question, it’s a pretty one, with net imports as a share of consumption falling to levels not seen in nearly three decades. That’s great news for job creation, the economy, our balance of trade and America’s energy security.

But here’s another pretty picture: declining imports of liquefied natural gas (LNG). Actually, “declining” is too mild a term for what we’re seeing. Thanks to energy developed from shale using hydraulic fracturing and horizontal drilling, the U.S. has become the world’s No. 1 natural gas producer – which has dramatically cut the need to shop the world market for supplies of natural gas, illustrated in plummeting LNG imports.

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Shale Energy’s Consumer Benefits

shale energy  lng exports  fracking chemicals  hydraulic fracturing  horizontal drilling  natural gas pipelines 

Mary Leshper

Mary Schaper
Posted November 12, 2014

EIA Today in Energy Blog: Increased natural gas production is projected to satisfy 60% to 80% of a potential increase in demand for added liquefied natural gas (LNG) exports from the Lower 48 states, according to recently released EIA analysis. The report, Effect of Increased Levels of Liquefied Natural Gas Exports on U.S. Energy Market, considered the long-term effects of several LNG export scenarios specified by the Department of Energy's Office of Fossil Energy (FE). The study also considered implications for natural gas prices, consumption, primary energy use, and energy-related emissions. Effects on overall economic growth were positive but modest. A discussion of caveats and limitations of the analysis is also included.

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Shale = Bright U.S. Energy Future

american energy  fracking  Economy  jobs  gasoline prices  lng exports 

Mary Leshper

Mary Schaper
Posted October 28, 2014

Real Clear Politics: Few policy objectives over the last half-century have proven as tantalizing for presidents as the call to achieve energy independence.

In 1973 -- as a gasoline shortage consumed the nation -- President Richard Nixon outlined Project Independence 1980, “a series of plans and goals set to insure that by the end of this decade, Americans will not have to rely on any source of energy beyond our own.” Gerald Ford, in his 1975 State of the Union address, called for “a massive program” to ease demand and increase supply “to achieve the independence we want by 1985.” Jimmy Carter, more modestly, aimed for the United States to cut its dependence on foreign oil by half by the end of the 1980s.

Ronald Reagan, George H.W. Bush, Bill Clinton, George W. Bush, and Barack Obama all set similar goals at different points in their presidential campaigns or presidencies. Typically, their political opponents did too. Little serious progress toward those goals was achieved during most of their terms in office.

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