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Energy Tomorrow Blog

Energy Growth, Progress and Campaign 2016

vote4energy  oil and natural gas  economic growth  us energy security 

Mark Green

Mark Green
Posted July 19, 2016

Energy and Campaign 2016 are a good fit. Whatever opportunity America has for present and future economic growth, individual prosperity and national security is connected to decisions voters will make this fall – and all of these things can be linked to energy.

All of us need energy, which is the reason it’s a rare bridge between the usual partisan divides. API President and CEO Jack Gerard earlier this year:

“As the two political parties look to … unify their parties behind a slate of candidates and party platforms, we want to remind them of the bipartisan nature and foundational role of our candidate: Energy, particularly oil and natural gas, which makes our modern society possible and provides our quality of life.”

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The President and Petroleum

petroleum  president obama  oil and natural gas  us energy security  economic benefits  access  fracking  infrastructure  vote4energy 

Mark Green

Mark Green
Posted July 6, 2016

Good to hear President Obama extolling some of the benefits of the U.S. energy revolution this week in North Carolina, starting with security and consumer benefits. Both are firmly linked to surging domestic oil production – which of course is why the United States leads the world in oil and natural gas output. The president:

“Remember when we were all concerned about our dependence on foreign oil? Well, let me tell you, we’ve cut the amount of oil we buy from other countries in half. Remember when the other team was promising they were going to get gas prices down in like 10 years? We did it. … So we have been able to shape an energy policy that’s good for families, good for your pocketbook.”

Indeed, producing more oil and gas here at home has had great impact on U.S. energy security and security overall. The United States is stronger in the world today because it is less dependent on others for imported energy. According to the U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA), net imports stood at 4.6 million barrels of oil per day in 2015 – lower than any year since they were at 4.2 million barrels per day in 1985. EIA projects that in 2040 net crude imports will drop to about 1.5 million barrels per day.

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Canada – Our Partner in Energy

canada  canadian oil sands  us energy security  oil imports 

Mark Green

Mark Green
Posted July 1, 2016

Happy Canada Day! Here in the U.S., if you’re not already celebrating with our friends to the North, think about starting. Canada is much more than a good neighbor.

Canada always has had America’s back (well, except for that War of 1812 thing). The best hockey players on the planet come from Canada, and their new prime minister is, well, pretty photogenic, eh?

OK, seriously, we celebrate with the Canadians because Canada is vital in terms of trade and energy security.

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A Look at Energy Projections and Polls

oil and natural gas  us energy security  climate  economic growth  eia 

Mark Green

Mark Green
Posted June 24, 2016

Let’s spend a few words supporting the work of the folks at the U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) – which compiles energy data and produces reports that depict America’s current energy picture, as well as projections on how that picture could look years from now. EIA’s analyses are valuable for policymakers, energy-associated industries, a range of business sectors and regular Americans.

Unfortunately, EIA is taking criticism from some quarters because its reports, such as the Annual Energy Outlook 2016, project that fossil fuels will continue to be the largest piece of the U.S. energy portfolio well into the future. A number of critics want EIA to issue projections that are more optimistic about the use of renewables. ...

While predicting things is tricky, it looks like EIA’s 2000 projection for 2015 turned out to be pretty accurate for petroleum/other liquids and renewables.

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Hearing the Voters on Energy

oil and natural gas  economic growth  access  vote4energy  us energy security 

Mark Green

Mark Green
Posted June 21, 2016

There’s a reason pro-energy messages and objectives enjoy overwhelming support from the American people: Americans recognize that domestic energy production is nonpartisan and that it leads to prosperity throughout the land.

In this election year, the key is getting the folks running for office at all levels to get onboard with the voting public, for them to hear the strong pro-energy message voters are sending – seen in a new Harris Poll released at this week’s “Energy and the Election” event.

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Talking vs. Doing on Climate

climate  emission reductions  natural gas  us energy security  consumer products 

Mark Green

Mark Green
Posted June 16, 2016

When it comes to making actual progress on climate through the reduction of carbon emissions, basically there are two groups: talkers and doers.

Talkers spend much of their time filibustering on the need to reduce emissions through central government planning – bureaucratic programs, new layers of regulation, onerous pricing mechanisms and more – while criticizing those who don’t rush to embrace Washington climate think.

As for the doers, they’re already reducing emissions. Our industry is part of this second group.

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The Affirmative Case For Energy

oil and natural gas  climate  emission reductions  us energy security 

Mark Green

Mark Green
Posted May 24, 2016

Compelling video interview earlier this month with Chevron Chairman and CEO John S. Watson by the Wall Street Journal – headlined the “Morality of Oil.”

This is especially timely, given the claims of some industry opponents that affordable, reliable, portable energy somehow isn’t a public good, despite some important facts to the contrary.

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Offshore Plan a Key to America’s Energy Future

offshore energy development  atlantic ocs  offshore leasing plan  economic growth  jobs  us energy security 

Mark Green

Mark Green
Posted March 14, 2016

When BOEM releases its final program, perhaps this week, watch the Atlantic. A decision to keep the Atlantic lease sale in the five-year plan will say volumes about the administration’s view of offshore energy development. Erik Milito, API director of upstream and industry operations, joined representatives of two other organizations on a conference call with reporters to discuss the next leasing program:

“The possible benefits for developing oil and natural gas off of the Atlantic coast are numerous. The most promising areas for development run all the way from the coasts of Maine to Florida. Official government figures project the possibility of nearly 5 billion barrels of oil and over 37 trillion cubic feet of gas contained by this section of the Atlantic Shelf. This is American energy security, American jobs, U.S. government revenue and American GDP tied up by political red tape. This is a once-in-a-generation opportunity, stuck, off limits to future generations as it waits for forward-looking energy policy.”

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Voters Support Offshore Energy

atlantic ocs  offshore drilling  oil and natural gas production  us energy security  economic growth 

Jack Gerard

Jack Gerard
Posted March 9, 2016

Offshore oil production in the Gulf of Mexico is set to reach a record high next year, according to new projections from the U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA). By the end of 2017, production is projected to reach 1.9 million barrels per day, accounting for 21 percent of total U.S. crude oil production.

That represents a crucial contribution to America’s energy security, economy and global energy leadership. Imagine if we doubled it. Opening areas in the Atlantic, Pacific and Eastern Gulf of Mexico could lead to production of more than 3.5 million barrels of oil equivalent per day – almost twice the amount EIA projects we’ll hit next year in the western Gulf alone.

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Natural Gas and Market-Driven Emissions Progress

natural gas benefits  co2 emissions  emission reductions  us energy security  economic benefits  renewable energy 

Mark Green

Mark Green
Posted March 4, 2016

Just recently saw this article on National Geographic.com, suggesting the United States made a significant shift in its energy economy in 2015:

Consider what happened last year alone. The amount of electricity from coal-fired power plants hit a record low while that from natural gas generators hit a record high. Also, renewable energy added the most new power to the electric grid, and annual carbon emissions reached a 20-year low.

First, a reminder that new power capacity added to the grid doesn’t translate directly to new power. Below, U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) data shows that in terms of electricity generation change (from 2014 to 2015) at utility-scale facilities and including distributed solar, natural gas led in net generation:  

That’s not knocking renewables, just an illustration of today’s energy reality and a reminder of the oft-overlooked energy, economic and climate benefits accruing to the United States from increasing natural gas use.

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