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Energy Tomorrow Blog

Safe or Safer Offshore Regulatory Compliance

offshore safety  safe operations  bsee  offshore technology  innovation  spill 

Mark Green

Mark Green
Posted February 28, 2019

Months before the federal offshore well control rule went into effect in July 2016, API told Congress the safety regulation could actually increase risks associated with offshore oil and natural gas development – that its rigid requirements could stifle innovation and thwart the effectiveness of new operational technologies.

The 2016 rule is an example of “prescriptive” regulation, a one-size-fits-all approach that requires certain processes, procedures and tests. It was and is the wrong approach for offshore safety – mainly because every oil and natural gas well has different characteristics: geology, depth, water pressure and temperature and other variables that factor into developing the best safety plan for a particular well.

In that context offshore operators seek government-approved alternative compliance paths – which they’ve done since the rule’s launch in 2016, when the Obama administration was in charge of the Bureau of Safety and Environmental Enforcement (BSEE), the overseer of offshore safety. Indeed, the requests show the rule needs fixing.

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Congress Should Approve U.S.-Canada-Mexico Agreement

trade  canada  mexico  us energy security  consumers  economic growth 

Mark Green

Mark Green
Posted February 26, 2019

When the U.S.-Mexico-Canada Agreement (USMCA) was announced last fall, we pointed out that it would be good for North American energy security and continue flourishing energy trade between the United States and its neighbors by providing market access and zero tariffs for U.S. natural gas and oil and related products.

The agreement would sustain and expand the gains made under its predecessor, NAFTA, which created a North American energy market, helped make the U.S. more energy secure and benefited U.S. consumers.

Congress should approve USMCA as soon as possible to lock in the critically important energy relationship between the U.S., Mexico and Canada – as well as the general flows of goods and services so vital to good economic health in this country. 

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A Break in the LNG Exports Logjam

lng exports  us energy security  trade  ferc 

Mark Green

Mark Green
Posted February 22, 2019

A big win this week for U.S. liquid natural gas exports: The Federal Energy Regulatory Commission’s approval of the Calcasieu Pass liquid natural gas (LNG) export facility in Louisiana – marking an end to a two-year logjam on LNG export approvals while boosting American global energy leadership and signaling opportunity to European allies who’ve been beholden to Russia for natural gas.

The $4.5 billion Calcasieu Pass project near Cameron Parish will be able to export 10 million metric tons per annum of LNG per year. Venture Global first applied for FERC approval for the facility in 2015. About a dozen other proposed facilities await FERC approval. Now, perhaps, the end’s in sight. 

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Policies That Constrain Natural Gas Pinch Massachusetts Consumers

consumers  massachusetts  natural gas  infrastructure  pipelines 

Mark Green

Mark Green
Posted February 21, 2019

Update: Middleborough, Massachusetts, has joined parts of New York’s Westchester County on a list of places in the Northeast U.S. where they’ve announced moratoriums on new natural gas service.

As is true in Westchester, there’s not enough pipeline infrastructure to deliver natural gas to everyone in Middleborough who wants it. No question, the situation in Middleborough is unfortunate – as it is in sections of Westchester County affected by the natural gas moratorium there.

Blame short-sighted, agenda-driven opposition to constructing new natural gas pipelines or expand existing ones. Natural gas is near enough – in the Marcellus shale play in Pennsylvania that also extends into New York state.

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Enhanced Safety Standard Helps Protect Workers, Environment

api standards program  workplace safety  environmental impact 

Mark Green

Mark Green
Posted February 20, 2019

Over API’s 100-year history – we complete our first century next month – we’ve created more than 700 standards to enhance the safety, efficiency and sustainability of natural gas and oil operations. The newest of these updates Recommended Practice 54 (RP 54), which sets procedures to advance and maintain a safe and healthy work environment in drilling and well servicing operations.

Specifically, the new edition of RP 54 (first developed in 1981) includes a section on flowback operations, which is important for safe well testing. It also includes revised requirements for process hazard assessment for facilities and sites and introduces formal risk assessments and expanded provisions for offshore operations.


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Climate Change Threats are Real – Policy Solutions Must Be As Well

consumers  climate change  energy  congress  economic impacts 

Mark Green

Mark Green
Posted February 13, 2019

The Green New Deal is getting quite a bit of attention in Washington right now, and naturally, people want to know what the natural gas and oil industry thinks about the proposal to revolutionize America’s economy and way of life – since it appears the plan aims to eliminate natural gas and oil, the nation’s leading fuels, right when there’s record energy demand by consumers.

My reaction is that any proposal that would fundamentally reorder American energy – and the way of life in this country – should first be measured by its impacts on American consumers, the economy and the country’s opportunity for future prosperity.

Especially this one. There’s little question that GND would significantly alter America as we know it.


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The ‘Amazing’ U.S. Shale Revolution

us energy security  oil and natural gas production  oil imports  shale energy  hydraulic fracturing 

Mark Green

Mark Green
Posted February 12, 2019

Recent tweet from the American Enterprise Institute’s Mark Perry includes a chart that vividly illustrates one of the biggest benefits of the U.S. energy revolution. First, it plots soaring U.S. net petroleum imports, which peaked at 60.3 percent in 2005, and then logs the plunge to just 12.1 percent last year. The thing that caught my eye in Perry’s tweet is that the time frame for his graph, 1957-2018, is pretty much the span of this blogger’s life.

Most importantly, in one generation, the United States has gone from steadily growing energy dependency to a nation that’s largely in control of its energy destiny. It’s a turnabout many of Americans never thought possible. Remarkable. Breathtaking. Or, as Perry tweets, amazing.


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The Unforced Error of Trade Policies That Impede the Economy

economic growth  gdp  trade  consumers  exports 

Mark Green

Mark Green
Posted February 8, 2019

The nonpartisan Congressional Budget Office’s new report, “The Budget and Economic Outlook: 2019 to 2029,” says what we’ve been saying for some time now – the administration’s tariff policies are a drag on the broader economy.

CBO projects that “the recent changes in trade policy in the United States and its trading-partner countries will reduce the level of U.S. real GDP by about 0.1 percent by 2022

Now, 0.1 percent might not sound like a lot over that time period, but potentially we’re talking about hundreds of billions of dollars subtracted from the economy. Dean Foreman, API chief economist, says it’s particularly concerning in the context of an economy that’s decelerating.


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Energy, the Common Ground for Our Union

oil and natural gas  state of the union  president  congress 

Mark Green

Mark Green
Posted February 6, 2019

Tuesday night’s State of the Union message was aimed at Washington finding common ground to work for the American people. President Trump said policymakers should embrace the “boundless potential of cooperation, compromise and the common good.” It struck a chord; more than seven in 10 Americans said they liked the speech’s approach and tone.

The challenge now is to move beyond rhetorical flourishes to action. Think: energy. In the quest for the common ground to do the common good, lawmakers can start with energy.

Energy is America’s strong suit. 

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Another Counter-Productive Energy Tax Proposal in PA

pennsylvania severance tax  natural gas  consumers  infrastructure 

Mark Green

Mark Green
Posted February 5, 2019

Back in 2015, Pennsylvania Gov. Tom Wolf’s first year in office, we first likened his bid to hike taxes on natural gas production to killing the goose that lays golden eggs. That’s because over the years natural gas production has significantly benefited Pennsylvania – the nation’s No. 2 natural gas producer – in jobs, economic lift and impact fees paid by industry that have helped support public infrastructure, storm and water systems, public safety, housing and more, all over the commonwealth.

Negatively impacting a key Pennsylvania industry doesn’t make sense. Yet, in this new year, Wolf is back with a new tax scheme that could hamper natural gas production and its benefits – a proposal to borrow money to invest in infrastructure that would be paid back through a new natural gas production tax. Again, a tax on top of the impact fees industry already pays.


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