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Energy Tomorrow Blog

American Energy for the Greater Good

american energy  taxes  exports  jobs  Economy  manufacturing  fracking  lng exports  keystone xl pipeline 

Mary Leshper

Mary Schaper
Posted January 13, 2015

Forbes (Mark P. Mills): It was predictable. Oil gets cheap and now there’s a contingent in Congress looking to slap a new tax onto gasoline. What’s surprising is that there are some conservatives in both Congress and the pundictocracy also receptive to the notion, including the estimable Charles Krauthammer. It’s a terrible idea. Instead of raising taxes, the Congress should be focused on helping the industry that created the oil glut, and that nearly single-handedly sustained the U.S. economy through the recovery from the Great Recession: America’s shale producers who are now subject to nearly unprecedented foreign market manipulation.

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Energy Output, Supply and Consumer Benefits

american energy  gasoline  price  fracking  keystone xl 

Mary Leshper

Mary Schaper
Posted January 12, 2015

Bloomberg: Drivers paid an average of $2.2021 a gallon for regular gasoline at U.S. pumps last week, the lowest level for this time of year since 2009, according to Lundberg Survey Inc. Prices dropped 26.92 cents in the three-week period to Jan. 9 and are $1.14 a gallon below year-ago levels, according to the survey, which is based on information obtained at about 2,500 filling stations by the Camarillo, California-based company.

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‘This Unique American Moment’

state of american energy  american energy  oil and natural gas development  economic benefits  infrastructure  american petroleum institute 

Mark Green

Mark Green
Posted January 6, 2015

The U.S. energy revolution is fundamentally empowering. There’s no better word for it. Because of resurgent American energy, our country has choices where the horizon once was filled with energy-based limitations.

Because domestic energy is more abundant, Americans have renewed mobility – literally, in the form of cheaper gasoline that’s largely the result of U.S. crude oil impacting global markets and economically, because of oil and natural gas industry-supported job creation and investment, and a manufacturing renaissance spurred by affordable fuels and feedstocks.

No less important: The United States is more secure in the world because we’re much less dependent on energy from adversarial sources. America's all-of-the-above energy potential is a powerful opportunity for the nation.

This is a special moment in U.S. history, the dawn of a new energy-driven reality that could sustain and grow American prosperity here at home and America’s influence in the world. It could – if we seize it.

Throughout his annual State of American Energy address, API President and CEO Jack Gerard struck the positive chords of possibility in an American energy era – possibilities dependent on our national leadership’s ability to support “smart, responsible and forward-looking energy policies that promote economic growth, job creation and U.S. energy security and leadership.” 

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America’s Shale Boom Offers Big Consumer Benefits

fracking  heating oil  jobs  manufacturing  keystone xl pipeline  american energy 

Mary Leshper

Mary Schaper
Posted January 6, 2015

Cleveland.com: Cold January weather has arrived, but rates for natural gas have fallen. Both Dominion East Ohio and Columbia Gas of Ohio are posting standard rates that are lower than those in December and lower than year-ago January prices. These standard rates change monthly because they are linked to the monthly gas commodity contracts traded on the New York Mercantile Exchange.

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State of American Energy 2015

american energy  oil and natural gas development  domestic production  energy policy  hydraulic fracturing  horizontal drilling  safe operations 

Mark Green

Mark Green
Posted January 5, 2015

We’ve got an energy revolution taking place in this country, but can we keep it going – and even better, can we increase it?

These and more will be the focus of the State of American Energy event on Tuesday from Washington D.C. You can watch the event live here beginning at 12:15 p.m. Eastern.  Join in the conversation on Twitter using the hashtag #SOAE2015.

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The Gift

american energy  oil and natural gas production  gasoline prices  domestic production  imports  fossil fuels  economic benefits  hydraulic fracturing  horizontal drilling  shale energy 

Mark Green

Mark Green
Posted December 24, 2014

The gift that is American energy is seen in some key numbers: domestic crude oil production reaching more than 9 million barrels per day last month, the highest level in more than two decades, according to the U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA); total U.S. net imports of energy as a share of energy consumption falling to their lowest level in nearly 30 years during the first six months of this year; gasoline prices dropping to an average of $2.47 per gallon last week, their lowest point since May 2009, according to the Lundberg Survey Inc.

The first two numbers might not fully register with a lot of Americans. We’ll come back to them. The last one, gasoline prices, does so loudly.

Retail gasoline prices fell after crude oil prices dropped for the fourth straight week – a product of weaker-than-expected global demand and increasing production, which EIA says will save American households $550 next year, Bloomberg News reports. Trilby Lundberg, president of Lundberg Survey to Bloomberg:

“It is a dramatic boon to fuel consumers. (Gasoline) is a modest portion of our giant gross domestic product and yet it does have a pervasive and festive benefit to motorists.”

During this season of gift-giving and receiving, Americans should give thanks for the gifts of plentiful domestic oil and natural gas, modern technologies to harness them and an industry robust and innovative enough to bring the two together, resulting in surging, home-grown production. Indeed, the dramatic increase in U.S. oil production is the key addition to global supply that’s putting downward pressure on the cost of crude, the No. 1 factor in pump prices.

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America’s Energy Abundance

american energy  Economy  exports  crude oil  imports  fracking 

Mary Leshper

Mary Schaper
Posted December 23, 2014

Dallas Business Journal: So far this year, the U.S. has imported 369.8 million barrels of crude oil, according to the Energy Information Administration. Sure, that sounds like a lot, especially in light of the shale boom renaissance that has swept the country. Until you look at the past few years. For the same period in 2010, the U.S. imported 456.1 million barrels of crude, according to the EIA. So, in four years, oil imports have declined 19 percent and will likely continue to decrease in future years.

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American Energy, American Security

american energy  global energy  global markets  Economy  fracking  new york  jobs  keystone xl pipeline  regulations 

Mary Leshper

Mary Schaper
Posted December 22, 2014

Wall Street Journal: In early October, Saudi Arabia’s representative to OPEC surprised attendees at a New York seminar by revealing his government was content to let global energy prices slide. Nasser al-Dossary ’s message broke from decades of Saudi orthodoxy that sought to keep prices high by limiting global oil production, said people familiar with the session. That set the stage for Saudi Arabia’s oil mandarins to send crude prices tumbling late last month after persuading other members of the Organization of the Petroleum Exporting Countries to keep production steady.

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America’s Energy Abundance is Changing the Global Market

Energy Security  Economy  american energy  jobs  exports  keystone xl pipeline 

Mary Leshper

Mary Schaper
Posted December 17, 2014

San Antonio Express-News: Gasoline prices are low, U.S. oil production is growing and OPEC is widening discounts for oil. Congratulations America, this is what energy security looks like. Every U.S. president since Richard Nixon has called for energy security by either producing more, using less or switching fuel sources. Over the past 20 years, we’ve done all three, while encouraging an international market where no single actor can monopolize supply. “The thing about energy security is that you don’t want bad people overseas to be able to hurt you by suddenly changing the oil market,” said Eugene Gholz, an associate professor at the University of Texas’ LBJ School of Public Affairs. “You are secure if you are protected from shocks in supply, especially from politically induced shocks.”

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Consumers Benefiting from More American Energy

Economy  jobs  american energy  fracking  lng exports  exports 

Mary Leshper

Mary Schaper
Posted December 16, 2014

EIA Today in Energy: The average U.S. household is expected to spend about $550 less on gasoline in 2015 compared with 2014, as annual motor fuel expenditures are on track to fall to their lowest level in 11 years. Lower fuel expenditures are attributable to a combination of falling retail gasoline prices and more fuel-efficient cars and trucks that reduce the number of gallons used to travel a given distance. Household gasoline costs are forecast to average $1,962 next year, assuming that EIA's price forecast, which is highly uncertain, is realized. Should the forecast be realized, motor fuel expenditures (gasoline and motor oil) in 2015 would be below $2,000 for the first time since 2009, according to EIA's December 2014 Short-Term Energy Outlook(STEO).

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