Skip to main content

Energy Tomorrow Blog

Energy Abundance and Global Energy Leadership

oil and natural gas production  keystone xl pipeline  fuels  refineries  greenhouse gas emissions  ozone regulations  renewable fuel standard  cera 

Jack Gerard

Jack Gerard
Posted April 22, 2015

Today, the United States leads in petroleum products, refining and natural gas production, and we’re on track to lead in the production of crude oil; facts reinforced by last week’s EIA Annual Energy Outlook.

The report confirmed that our nation is more energy secure than ever before.  And it said in part that domestic production of natural gas is projected to grow through 2040 eventually reaching 35.45 tcf; and domestic oil production is projected to exceed 10 mbd in a few years and remain at that level through 2030.  Keeping pace with our nation’s increased development of our energy resources are the 139 operating refineries that produce more fuel than ever before and support roughly 540,000 good paying jobs and 1.9 percent of our nation’s economy.  

More »

The Global Potential of U.S. Energy

oil and natural gas production  energy exports  keystone xl pipeline  government revenues  hydraulic fracturing  water supplies 

Mark Green

Mark Green
Posted April 7, 2015

BloombergView: It's a pernicious bit of American mythology that is used to justify the law against domestic oil producers selling their crude overseas: The U.S. needs "energy independence." Never mind that the law actually undermines this goal, or that the goal itself is practically impossible to achieve. It's the wrong goal. What the U.S. should be striving for is not independence, but energy security.

The story behind the myth goes something like this: If the U.S. doesn't hoard all its oil, then it can't hope to attain energy independence. And until it does that, it has to keep buying oil from politically unstable or unfriendly regimes. Therefore U.S. consumers must tolerate volatile prices for gasoline and heating oil.

The tale is false, but it brushes against one truth: When instability in other countries affects the price of oil, the U.S. economy can suffer. Just last month, the price jumped almost 5 percent when Saudi bombs began to fall on rebel targets in Yemen. Such unpredictable spikes make it difficult for many U.S. businesses to plan ahead, and this means less investment and less hiring.

More »

Growing U.S. Energy Self-Sufficiency

oil and natural gas production  domestic energy access  eia  offshore energy  onshore development  shale energy  hydraulic fracturing  horizontal drilling 

Mark Green

Mark Green
Posted April 6, 2015

Statistics in the U.S. Energy Information Administration’s Monthly Energy Review for March show U.S. domestic energy production meeting about 89 percent of the country’s total energy demand. That’s up from 84 percent in 2013 and 2012 and reflects a key result of the domestic energy revolution: growing U.S. self-sufficiency.

EIA data shows U.S. energy production as a percentage of total demand. Total energy production (fossil fuels, nuclear electric power and renewables – again, as a percentage of total U.S. energy demand -- was about 69 percent in 2005, and it grew to about 89 percent last year. The share of fossil fuels (oil, natural gas and coal) accounted for approximately 55 percent in 2005, growing to about 70 percent last year.


More »

More Good News on Methane Emissions – Again

methane emissions  natural gas production  hydraulic fracturing  regulation  epa 

Mark Green

Mark Green
Posted February 10, 2015

Standout findings in a new major field study on methane emissions from natural gas collection and processing facilities across 13 states, led by Colorado State University include a couple of points:

First, of 130 facilities that collect natural gas from production wells, remove impurities and deliver it to inter- and intrastate pipeline networks,  101 had methane loss rates below 1 percent – including 85 of the 114 gathering facilities and all 16 of the processing plants studied. Put another way, methane containment at these facilities is more than 99 percent.

Second, the majority of emissions resulted from abnormalities involving broken or faulty equipment – issues that are relatively easy to address.

More »

America – Energy Superpower

oil and natural gas production  job creation  economic growth  hydraulic fracturing  horizontal drilling  shale energy 

Mark Green

Mark Green
Posted January 20, 2015

API’s new national television ad underscores the ramifications of the United States as the world’s No. 1 producer of natural gas and its likely ascendance this year to No. 1 status in oil production. America is the world’s newest energy superpower.

As the ad notes, the domestic energy revolution that has elevated the U.S. the energy superpower status is because of safe, advanced hydraulic fracturing and horizontal drilling, which have unlocked vast oil and natural gas reserves held in shale and other tight-rock formations.

More »

The Possibilities of Resilient American Energy

us energy  gasoline prices  crude oil  exports  trade  economic benefits  oil and natural gas production  keystone xl pipeline  fracking  regulation 

Mark Green

Mark Green
Posted January 16, 2015

Bloomberg: Ending restrictions on U.S. crude exports could cut gasoline prices as much as 12 cents a gallon, a Columbia University study co-written by a former adviser to President Barack Obama has concluded.

Without the partial ban, domestic production might increase as much as 1.2 million barrels a day by 2025, making the U.S. more resilient to global supply disruptions, according to the study.

“Easing energy export restrictions does not raise gasoline prices for consumers,” Jason Bordoff, a former energy and climate adviser to Obama who is now director of the Center on Global Energy Policy at Columbia University, said in a telephone interview.

More »

Energy is Making America Stronger

gasoline prices  hydraulic fracturing  fracking  horizontal drilling  imports  oil and natural gas production  new york 

Mark Green

Mark Green
Posted December 29, 2014

The Week: One of the biggest stories of 2014 has been the astonishing drop in global oil prices. The price of the benchmark Brent crude went from over $100 per barrel at the beginning of the year to the $60 range as of this writing.

It's worth noting how massive and completely unexpected this price drop has been.

And it's worth noting how good it is for the U.S. economy. The price of oil is one of the biggest drags on consumer demand, the largest driver of the economy.

And to what do we owe this miraculous event?

In a word: fracking.

More »

The Gift

american energy  oil and natural gas production  gasoline prices  domestic production  imports  fossil fuels  economic benefits  hydraulic fracturing  horizontal drilling  shale energy 

Mark Green

Mark Green
Posted December 24, 2014

The gift that is American energy is seen in some key numbers: domestic crude oil production reaching more than 9 million barrels per day last month, the highest level in more than two decades, according to the U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA); total U.S. net imports of energy as a share of energy consumption falling to their lowest level in nearly 30 years during the first six months of this year; gasoline prices dropping to an average of $2.47 per gallon last week, their lowest point since May 2009, according to the Lundberg Survey Inc.

The first two numbers might not fully register with a lot of Americans. We’ll come back to them. The last one, gasoline prices, does so loudly.

Retail gasoline prices fell after crude oil prices dropped for the fourth straight week – a product of weaker-than-expected global demand and increasing production, which EIA says will save American households $550 next year, Bloomberg News reports. Trilby Lundberg, president of Lundberg Survey to Bloomberg:

“It is a dramatic boon to fuel consumers. (Gasoline) is a modest portion of our giant gross domestic product and yet it does have a pervasive and festive benefit to motorists.”

During this season of gift-giving and receiving, Americans should give thanks for the gifts of plentiful domestic oil and natural gas, modern technologies to harness them and an industry robust and innovative enough to bring the two together, resulting in surging, home-grown production. Indeed, the dramatic increase in U.S. oil production is the key addition to global supply that’s putting downward pressure on the cost of crude, the No. 1 factor in pump prices.

More »

Thankful For… American Energy

american energy  oil and natural gas production  shale energy  hydraulic fracturing  horizontal drilling  fracking  crude oil  exports  gasoline prices 

Mark Green

Mark Green
Posted November 27, 2014

Happy Thanksgiving everybody.

When it comes to energy there’s much for which Americans can give thanks.

We have plentiful and accessible reserves of oil and natural gas that fuel healthy, mobile, modern lifestyles.

We enjoy safe and secure crude oil imports from Canada, our neighbor and ally and No. 1 source of imported oil.

Our country is served by a vibrant, modern industry – one that’s second to none in the use of safe, hydraulic fracturing and horizontal drilling, offshore development and environmental awareness.

America keeps running thanks to a vast pipeline network and the world’s biggest, most-efficient refineries. And there’s more.

More »

What We Know on Methane: Falling Emissions

methane emissions  emission reductions  natural gas production  hydraulic fracturing  horizontal drilling  epa 

Mark Green

Mark Green
Posted October 22, 2014

This from Judi Greenwald, the Energy Department’s deputy director for climate, environment and efficiency, talking about methane regulation during a panel discussion this week (as reported by Fuel Fix.com):

“We know enough to act. There are uncertainties about methane emissions — and part of the administration’s strategy is to improve our numbers — but we know enough to take some action, and this problem may be easier to solve than many characterize.”

While others talk about methane and problem solving, industry already is significantly lowering methane emissions – even as natural gas production soars, thanks to safe fracking.

More »