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Energy Tomorrow Blog

The Gift

american energy  oil and natural gas production  gasoline prices  domestic production  imports  fossil fuels  economic benefits  hydraulic fracturing  horizontal drilling  shale energy 

Mark Green

Mark Green
Posted December 24, 2014

The gift that is American energy is seen in some key numbers: domestic crude oil production reaching more than 9 million barrels per day last month, the highest level in more than two decades, according to the U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA); total U.S. net imports of energy as a share of energy consumption falling to their lowest level in nearly 30 years during the first six months of this year; gasoline prices dropping to an average of $2.47 per gallon last week, their lowest point since May 2009, according to the Lundberg Survey Inc.

The first two numbers might not fully register with a lot of Americans. We’ll come back to them. The last one, gasoline prices, does so loudly.

Retail gasoline prices fell after crude oil prices dropped for the fourth straight week – a product of weaker-than-expected global demand and increasing production, which EIA says will save American households $550 next year, Bloomberg News reports. Trilby Lundberg, president of Lundberg Survey to Bloomberg:

“It is a dramatic boon to fuel consumers. (Gasoline) is a modest portion of our giant gross domestic product and yet it does have a pervasive and festive benefit to motorists.”

During this season of gift-giving and receiving, Americans should give thanks for the gifts of plentiful domestic oil and natural gas, modern technologies to harness them and an industry robust and innovative enough to bring the two together, resulting in surging, home-grown production. Indeed, the dramatic increase in U.S. oil production is the key addition to global supply that’s putting downward pressure on the cost of crude, the No. 1 factor in pump prices.

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America’s Energy Abundance

american energy  Economy  exports  crude oil  imports  fracking 

Mary Leshper

Mary Schaper
Posted December 23, 2014

Dallas Business Journal: So far this year, the U.S. has imported 369.8 million barrels of crude oil, according to the Energy Information Administration. Sure, that sounds like a lot, especially in light of the shale boom renaissance that has swept the country. Until you look at the past few years. For the same period in 2010, the U.S. imported 456.1 million barrels of crude, according to the EIA. So, in four years, oil imports have declined 19 percent and will likely continue to decrease in future years.

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American Energy, American Security

american energy  global energy  global markets  Economy  fracking  new york  jobs  keystone xl pipeline  regulations 

Mary Leshper

Mary Schaper
Posted December 22, 2014

Wall Street Journal: In early October, Saudi Arabia’s representative to OPEC surprised attendees at a New York seminar by revealing his government was content to let global energy prices slide. Nasser al-Dossary ’s message broke from decades of Saudi orthodoxy that sought to keep prices high by limiting global oil production, said people familiar with the session. That set the stage for Saudi Arabia’s oil mandarins to send crude prices tumbling late last month after persuading other members of the Organization of the Petroleum Exporting Countries to keep production steady.

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America’s Energy Abundance is Changing the Global Market

Energy Security  Economy  american energy  jobs  exports  keystone xl pipeline 

Mary Leshper

Mary Schaper
Posted December 17, 2014

San Antonio Express-News: Gasoline prices are low, U.S. oil production is growing and OPEC is widening discounts for oil. Congratulations America, this is what energy security looks like. Every U.S. president since Richard Nixon has called for energy security by either producing more, using less or switching fuel sources. Over the past 20 years, we’ve done all three, while encouraging an international market where no single actor can monopolize supply. “The thing about energy security is that you don’t want bad people overseas to be able to hurt you by suddenly changing the oil market,” said Eugene Gholz, an associate professor at the University of Texas’ LBJ School of Public Affairs. “You are secure if you are protected from shocks in supply, especially from politically induced shocks.”

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Consumers Benefiting from More American Energy

Economy  jobs  american energy  fracking  lng exports  exports 

Mary Leshper

Mary Schaper
Posted December 16, 2014

EIA Today in Energy: The average U.S. household is expected to spend about $550 less on gasoline in 2015 compared with 2014, as annual motor fuel expenditures are on track to fall to their lowest level in 11 years. Lower fuel expenditures are attributable to a combination of falling retail gasoline prices and more fuel-efficient cars and trucks that reduce the number of gallons used to travel a given distance. Household gasoline costs are forecast to average $1,962 next year, assuming that EIA's price forecast, which is highly uncertain, is realized. Should the forecast be realized, motor fuel expenditures (gasoline and motor oil) in 2015 would be below $2,000 for the first time since 2009, according to EIA's December 2014 Short-Term Energy Outlook(STEO).

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An Economic Boost, Thanks to American Energy

Economy  jobs  american energy  fracking  lng exports  exports 

Mary Leshper

Mary Schaper
Posted December 15, 2014

Penn Live (Raymond Keating): At this weekend's annual Pennsylvania Society Holiday Dinner in New York City, I suspect energy policy will be a frequent topic of discussion — as it should rightfully be. From Benjamin Franklin's first experiments with electricity in Philadelphia to the energy revolution taking place in the Marcellus Shale natural gas play, the Keystone State has led the way in developing resources to the benefit of all Pennsylvanians and the entire nation.

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America’s Growing Energy Potential

american energy  Economy  growth  jobs  fracking  keystone xl pipeline 

Mary Leshper

Mary Schaper
Posted December 10, 2014

Reuters: A surge of oil and gas production will drive the U.S.economy 1 percent higher in 2040 than it would have otherwise grown, and energy exports will only stoke the expansion, an independent study on energy policy concluded on Tuesday.

 

New drilling technologies such as 'fracking' have unlocked an abundance of fossil fuels from shale deposits and the bounty will both jolt the economy and increase tax receipts, according to the study from the Congressional Budget Office.

 

Officials estimate "real (inflation-adjusted) GDP product will be about two-thirds of 1 percent higher in 2020 and about 1 percent higher in 2040 than it would have been without the development of shale resources," the report finds.

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Thankful For… American Energy

american energy  oil and natural gas production  shale energy  hydraulic fracturing  horizontal drilling  fracking  crude oil  exports  gasoline prices 

Mark Green

Mark Green
Posted November 27, 2014

Happy Thanksgiving everybody.

When it comes to energy there’s much for which Americans can give thanks.

We have plentiful and accessible reserves of oil and natural gas that fuel healthy, mobile, modern lifestyles.

We enjoy safe and secure crude oil imports from Canada, our neighbor and ally and No. 1 source of imported oil.

Our country is served by a vibrant, modern industry – one that’s second to none in the use of safe, hydraulic fracturing and horizontal drilling, offshore development and environmental awareness.

America keeps running thanks to a vast pipeline network and the world’s biggest, most-efficient refineries. And there’s more.

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Thankful For: American Energy Security

Energy Security  american energy  Economy  jobs  fracking  regulation  keystone xl pipeline 

Mary Leshper

Mary Schaper
Posted November 26, 2014

EIA Today in Energy Blog: U.S. retail regular-grade gasoline prices continue to decline, averaging $2.82 per gallon (gal) as of November 24. This average is 47 cents lower than a year ago, and the lowest price heading into a Thanksgiving holiday since 2009.

 

Traditionally, the Thanksgiving holiday is one of the most traveled times of the year in the United States, and much of that travel is by car. AAA estimates that during this Thanksgiving holiday weekend (November 26-30), 41.3 million people in the United States will travel more than 50 miles from home by car. This level of travel, 4.3% higher than the same time last year, is the highest number of travelers by car for Thanksgiving in seven years and the third highest since AAA began publishing the data in 2000.

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Thankful For: Fracking

fracking  american energy  Economy  jobs 

Mary Leshper

Mary Schaper
Posted November 25, 2014

CNBC: America's unexpected transformation into the world's biggest natural gas producer and one of the globe's largest oil producers will give the U.S. more geopolitical clout on the world stage—including in key relationships with China, Russia and the Middle East.

 

By 2020, the U.S. is likely to be energy independent, along with Canada, its biggest import and export partner. Add to that a new boom expected from a reforming energy industry in Mexico, and North America will more than hold its own as a powerhouse in the global energy market.

 

The ripple, however, will be increasingly felt across the world. In the next several years, the European Union could be importing U.S. gas—and possibly even oil, if current laws change—lessening Russia's stranglehold on the European economy.

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