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Energy Tomorrow Blog

The Iran Irony

analysis  energy exports  crude oil  economic growth  gasoline costs  american petroleum institute  Jack Gerard 

Mark Green

Mark Green
Posted July 29, 2015

The current crude oil export debate basically is about global competition – and whether the United States will stop sanctioning itself and let an American commodity trade freely on the global market.

An irony – we’ll call it the “Iran Irony” – underscores the anti-competitive nature of our outdated ban on oil exports and the strategic shortsightedness of maintaining it.

The “Iran Irony” is this: While the U.S. advances a nuclear deal that would let Iran reemerge as a major oil supplier on the global market – to Iran’s economic and competitive gain – the United States denies itself similar benefits by banning its own crude exports. This is hurting America’s global competitiveness, diminishing the potential positive impacts of America’s rise as an energy superpower.

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Energizing Minnesota

analysis  minnesota  crude oil exports  energy supplies  gasoline prices  lng exports  pricewaterhousecoopers  revenue  wood mackenzie 

Reid Porter

Reid Porter
Posted July 29, 2015

Our series highlighting the economic and jobs impact of energy in each of the 50 states continues today with Minnesota. We started this week with North Dakota and Illinois. All information covered in this series can be found online here, arranged on an interactive map of the United States. State-specific information across the country will be populated on this map as the series continues.

 As we can see with Minnesota, the energy impacts of the states individually combine to form energy’s national economic and jobs picture: 9.8 million jobs supported and $1.2 trillion in value added.

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Energizing Illinois

analysis  illinois  income  energy  crude oil  exports  pricewaterhousecoopers  revenue  wood mackenzie 

Reid Porter

Reid Porter
Posted July 28, 2015

Our series highlighting the economic and jobs impact of energy in each of the 50 states continues today with Illinois. We started the week with a look at North Dakota. All information covered in this series can be found online here, arranged on an interactive map of the United States. State-specific information across the country will be populated on this map as the series continues.

As we can see with Illinois, the energy impacts of the states individually combine to form energy’s national economic and jobs picture: 9.8 million jobs supported and $1.2 trillion in value added.

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Energizing North Dakota

analysis  north dakota  crude oil exports  lng  oil and natural gas development  pricewaterhousecoopers  regulation  wood mackenzie 

Reid Porter

Reid Porter
Posted July 27, 2015

Our series highlighting the economic and jobs impact of energy in each of the 50 states continues today with North Dakota. We started our focus on the state level with Virginia on June 29. All information covered in this series can be found online here, arranged on an interactive map of the United States. State-specific information across the country will be populated on this map as the series continues.

As we can see with North Dakota, the energy impacts of the states individually combine to form energy’s national economic and jobs picture: 9.8 million jobs supported and $1.2 trillion in value added.

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Energizing Oregon

analysis  oregon  crude oil exports  income  lng  oil and natural gas development  pricewaterhousecoopers  regulation  wood mackenzie 

Reid Porter

Reid Porter
Posted July 24, 2015

Our series highlighting the economic and jobs impact of energy in each of the 50 states continues today with Oregon. This week started with Maine and the series began with Virginia on June 29. All information covered in this series can be found online here, arranged on an interactive map of the United States. State-specific information across the country will be populated on this map as the series continues.

As we can see with Oregon, the energy impacts of the states individually combine to form energy’s national economic and jobs picture: 9.8 million jobs supported and $1.2 trillion in value added.

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Action Item: U.S. Oil Exports

analysis  crude oil  energy exports  global markets  domestic production 

Mark Green

Mark Green
Posted July 14, 2015

A potential nuclear deal with Iran that would permit the Iranians to resume exporting crude oil to global markets – short-term and long-term – underscores questions about our own oil export policies. Here are two: What are the implications of Iranian crude oil exports for U.S. production? And: When will our government lift de facto sanctions against the export of U.S. oil?

Bloomberg reports that Iran’s oil minister says the country can increase exports by 500,000 barrels a day as soon as economic sanctions are lifted, then an additional 500,000 barrels a day in the following six months. Richard Nephew of Columbia University’s Center on Global Energy Policy is less optimistic about that kind of ramp-up. The U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) has said Iran could reach 700,000 barrels per day by the end of 2016.

The point is, if there’s a nuclear deal that lifts economic sanctions against Iran, Iranian oil will be getting to market.

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U.S. Oil Exports: ‘The World Will Be a Safer Place’

analysis  energy exports  crude oil  production  economic benefits  american petroleum institute 

Mark Green

Mark Green
Posted July 10, 2015

The compelling case for lifting America’s decades-old ban on exporting domestic crude oil is multi-faceted.

There's the economic case, with NERA Economic Consulting estimated that lifting the ban could add $200 billion to $1.8 trillion to the U.S. economy between now and 2039. There's the case for consumers, with a variety of studies indicating that lifting the ban could lower prices at the fuel pump from 1.7 cents per gallon to up to 12 cents per gallon. There's the foreign policy case and the way home-grown crude oil could affect global relationships, helping allies and potentially neutralizing the ability of adversaries to use energy as a diplomatic weapon. Then there's the energy case. Domestic production, spurred by greater access to global crude markets, could grow by 2.1 million barrels per day to 4.3 million barrels per day over levels under the status quo, according to NERA.  

Certainly, each of these was argued again at a pair of Capitol Hill hearings, one by the House Agriculture Committee (video) and another by the Energy and Commerce Committee’s Energy and Power Subcommittee  (video).

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Energizing California

analysis  california  crude oil exports  energy development  income  oil and natural gas development  regulations  pricewaterhousecoopers  wood mackenzie 

Reid Porter

Reid Porter
Posted July 10, 2015

Our series highlighting the economic and jobs impact of energy in each of the 50 states continues today with California. We started our focus on the state level with Virginia on June 29 and continued this week with Missouri, Indiana, North Carolina and West Virginia. The energy impacts of the states individually combine to form energy’s national economic and jobs picture: 9.8 million jobs supported and $1.2 trillion in value added.

Information covered in this series can be found online here, arranged on an interactive map of the United States. State-specific information will be populated on this map as the series continues. 

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Systematizing Pipeline Safety

analysis  pipeline safety  standards  american petroleum institute  crude oil  petroleum products 

Mark Green

Mark Green
Posted July 8, 2015

A barrel of crude oil or petroleum product shipped by pipeline is safely delivered to its destination more than 99.999 percent of the time, but the industry’s objective remains: zero releases, zero incidents.

Toward that goal, API has just released a new standard to guide operators in the development of a systems approach to safety management – helping them to continuously evaluate their efforts and constantly improve safety. API Midstream Director Robin Rorick:

“Pipelines are safe and efficient, but we are always looking for new ways to make them better, which is why industry is embracing this new standard. It’s also a great example of what can be done when industry, regulators and all key stakeholders work together to achieve a common objective, which is to protect the public, the environment and provide the fuels Americans need.”

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Continuing the Push for Crude Exports

news  crude oil  crude markets  energy exports  president obama  epa 

Mark Green

Mark Green
Posted June 23, 2015

Fuelfix.com President Barack Obama “understands” the argument for exporting U.S. crude, a leading Democratic advocate said Monday.

“He understands,” Sen. Heidi Heitkamp, D-N.D., said on CNBC’s “Squawk Box.” “He is in that category of understanding. I think his State Department understands how significant this could be to soft power. I think his Energy Department understands that this is bad economics and bad for the resource.”

Heitkamp stressed that she couldn’t speak for the administration, but added that “at the highest level, they understand this policy is not a good policy.”

Still, when it comes to the politically treacherous subject of widely exporting U.S. oil — which has been under heavy restrictions since the 1970s — “everybody wants to get together and . . . make a bipartisan decision to do this,” Heitkamp added.

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