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Energy Tomorrow Blog

Energy Choices Unlock Energy’s Benefits

lng exports  economic growth  shale benefits  keystone xl  trade 

Mark Green

Mark Green
Posted May 16, 2014

Bloomberg: Dominion Resources (D) Inc.’s plan to export liquefied natural gas cleared a U.S. environmental review, a key step toward final approval as supporters in Congress seek to expedite overseas shipments of the fuel.

U.S. Federal Energy Regulatory Commission approval of Dominion’s proposed Cove Point project on Maryland’s Chesapeake Bay would have “no significant impact” on the environment, as long as proper measures are taken, the staff said today in an environmental assessment.

The full commission is scheduled to issue a final decision on Cove Point by Aug. 13. Cheniere Energy Inc. (LNG)’s Sabine Pass is the only U.S. project so far to win approval from the FERC and Energy Department.

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Domestic Energy Surge is Boosting Refining Sector

refineries  oil and natural gas development  shale energy  trade  economic growth  epa regulation 

Mark Green

Mark Green
Posted May 15, 2014

Another benefit of America’s energy renaissance is seen in the competitive edge North American refiners are gaining because of lower feedstock costs, resulting from surging domestic crude oil and natural gas production.

The latest “This Week in Petroleum” report by the U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) says that U.S. and Canadian refiners are in a stronger position relative to European counterparts because of lower costs for domestic crude oil and natural gas, from which they make a variety of value-added finished products.

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Open Markets, Free Trade = Win-Win for U.S. Energy Security

trade  Energy Security  american energy  Economy  ohio  keystone xl pipeline 

Mary Leshper

Mary Schaper
Posted April 14, 2014

The Hill (Rep. Pete Olson): The Great Recession that began at the end of this last decade has lingered like few others in recent history. Job growth has been sluggish, and unemployment numbers have ticked up only marginally, making this a painfully slow recovery. This is true in almost all sectors—except for energy. There, job growth has been nothing short of explosive. American innovation has allowed us to tap into energy resources previously off-limits and unreachable, creating jobs across the country.

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Sound Analysis Supports Exporting U.S. LNG

lng exports  natural gas benefits  energy department  greenhouse gas emissions  trade 

Mark Green

Mark Green
Posted April 10, 2014

Legislation that would accelerate U.S. exports of liquefied natural gas (LNG) – by approving a backlog of more than 20 export permits pending with the Energy Department and expediting future permit requests for export to World Trade Organization members – cleared an important hurdle in the U.S. House this week.

That’s good news for the United States, good news for U.S. energy development and good news for America’s friends abroad. API President and CEO Jack Gerard:

“In the last few weeks, new proposals have won bipartisan support in both the House and Senate, and we are optimistic that members will come together on efforts to harness the full economic and strategic power of America’s energy exports. The U.S. is the world’s top producer of natural gas, and allies around the globe are looking to America for leadership on energy issues. Now is the time to tear down our own bureaucratic hurdles to trade, create thousands of new American jobs, and strengthen our position as an energy superpower.”

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Free Trade Benefits Consumers and Economy

crude oil  exports  energy exports  job creation  economic growth  trade 

Mark Green

Mark Green
Posted March 31, 2014

new study by ICF International makes the case for lifting trade restrictions that prevent the export of U.S. crude oil – consumer savings, job creation, domestic production growth and more:

  • $5.8 billion in consumer savings a year, on average, between 2015 and 2035 due to falling costs of gasoline, heating oil and diesel fuel.
  • Up to 300,000 additional jobs created in 2020, both due to higher oil production and U.S. consumers having more money to spend on goods and services.
  • As much as a 500,000 barrels-per-day rise in domestic oil production in 2020.
  • A $22 billion decrease in the U.S. trade deficit in 2020.
  • Economic growth totaling as much as $38 billion in 2020, with an average GDP increase of up to $27 billion a year through 2035.
  • An additional $15 billion to $17 billion invested in domestic exploration, development and production between 2015 and 2020.
  • An increase of as much as $13.5 billion in federal, state and local government revenues in 2020.

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Please, Let Us Buy LNG From America

lng exports  lng  trade  energy department 

Mark Green

Mark Green
Posted March 25, 2014

Because Lithuania has a front-row seat to the current Ukraine-Russia crisis, the appearance of the country’s energy minister at a Senate hearing on U.S. liquefied natural gas (LNG) exports was especially timely. Jaroslav Neverovič had a pretty simple message to the United States: We need U.S. natural gas.

Neverovič probably was the most anticipated of the witnesses at the Energy and Natural Resources Committee’s hearing, the first led by Sen. Mary Landrieu, the panel’s new chairman. Neverovič:

“At present, we are completely – 100 percent – dependent upon single supplier of natural gas and, as a result, are forced to pay a political price for this vital energy resource. Lithuanian families and businesses pay 30 percent more for natural gas than citizens in other European countries. This is not just unfair. This is abuse of monopolist position.”

The minister said while Lithuania is taking steps to achieve energy independence, it needs help.

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Energy’s Growing Role in a Stronger America

lng exports  trade  economic growth  keystone xl pipeline 

Mark Green

Mark Green
Posted March 25, 2014

U.S. to Become Top LNG Exporter, Experts Say

Fuel Fix.com: HOUSTON — The U.S. is poised to become the top exporter of liquefied petroleum gas — more commonly known as propane or butane — within just a few years, officials with research analyst IHS said Monday.

By the 2020s, the U.S. likely will displace top LPG exporters including Qatar and the United Arab Emirates, said IHS Senior Director Walt Hart, during the IHS International LPG Seminar in Houston. The domestic supply of propane and butane is on the rise, produced along with the booming output of U.S. shale gas. But the domestic market for propane and butane is relatively flat, several experts said.

That’s not the case abroad. While most U.S. LPG exports go to Latin America today, a growing portion likely will go to Asia as demand there rises, in part due to its use as a fuel source for heating and cooking but also because of its role as a feedstock for the manufacture of petrochemicals.

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Momentum Builds for U.S. LNG Exports

lng exports  natural gas benefits  trade  job creation  innovation 

Mark Green

Mark Green
Posted March 24, 2014

U.S. Energy Boom May Signal New Export Era

Los Angeles Times: In a Louisiana swamp several miles upriver from the Gulf of Mexico, about 3,000 construction workers are building a massive industrial facility to liquefy natural gas, preparing for a new era when the U.S. will begin exporting energy around the globe.

The $12-billion project is one of the largest single industrial investments in the nation, part of a massive transformation of the energy sector that has led to a boom in drilling, transportation and refining from coast to coast.

Five years ago, the idea of exporting U.S. gas and oil was not only unheard of, but, in the case of most U.S. crude oil, illegal. At that time, the United States was facing a future of dwindling domestic supplies and vulnerability to foreign producers. It was anxiously building facilities to import natural gas, worried about ever-higher prices and building much of its foreign policy on the need to secure energy supplies.

But U.S. energy production has boomed with the technological revolution of hydraulic fracturing, known as fracking, and the ability to tap newly accessible massive reserves. The nation surpassed Russia in 2009 as the largest producer of natural gas and is expected to zip past Saudi Arabia next year to become the largest oil producer in the world.

Now, the U.S. energy industry is pushing for a new era of exports.

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LNG Exports, Jobs and Security

liquefied natural gas  lng  energy exports  infrastructure  investments  trade 

Mark Green

Mark Green
Posted March 12, 2014

In a post last week we discussed the way the Ukrainian crisis is focusing a number of U.S. leaders on the potential foreign policy impacts of surging U.S. energy production. With its vast natural gas reserves, the U.S. could be a leader in the global market for liquefied natural gas (LNG), if we took the steps to make that happen – starting with government approval of permits to build LNG export terminals.

Unfortunately, that process is slow. Although the Energy Department has approved six applications since 2011, more than 20 still are pending. And the U.S. isn’t the only country eyeing the global LNG market. More than 60 non-U.S. LNG export projects are planned or under construction. In a number of ways, it’s a race to the rewards stemming from natural gas abundance.

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U.S. Energy’s Impact Continues to Grow

alternative energy  trade  Energy Security  Environment  fracking  keystone xl pipeline 

Mary Leshper

Mary Schaper
Posted February 26, 2014

Surge in Fuel Exports Boosting U.S. Trade Balance

Fuel Fix Blog: HOUSTON — Growing production of U.S. oil and gas is helping to improve the nation’s trade balance, according to a federal report Monday.

 

Dramatic growth in the export of refined petroleum products, such as jet fuel and gasoline, has led the way. The value of net refined exports increased 55 percent in 2013 over the prior year, reaching $33 billion, according to the U.S. Energy Information Administration.

 

U.S. refiners are finding cheaper domestic alternatives to overseas oil, causing a rally in the ratio of refined fuel exports to imports. Overall energy export values increased 8 percent in 2013 over the prior year. Total energy imports to the U.S. fell by 11 percent for the same time period.

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