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API: Additional oil and gas regulations unnecessary for reducing emissions

Carlton Carroll | 202.682.8114 |

WASHINGTON, August 18, 2015 – EPA’s proposal for additional methane regulations on oil and gas wells and transmission are duplicative, costly, and undermine America’s competitiveness. The industry has already led the significant reduction in methane through innovation and existing regulations, according to API President and CEO Jack Gerard.

“The oil and gas industry is leading the charge in reducing methane,” Gerard said. “The last thing we need is more duplicative and costly regulation that could increase the cost of energy for Americans. Even as oil and natural gas production has surged, methane emissions from hydraulically fractured natural gas wells have fallen nearly 79 percent since 2005, and CO2 emissions are down to 27-year lows. This is due to industry leadership and significant investments in new technologies.”

EPA’s own analysis shows that methane emissions from hydraulically fractured natural gas wells have fallen dramatically. Total methane emissions from natural gas systems are down 11 percent since 2005 – a direct result of industry innovation at the same time production has increased significantly, according to API.

“API supports a common sense regulatory approach that builds on cost-effective controls already required by EPA for new equipment,” Gerard said. “Combined with smart, voluntary efforts for existing sources, this approach will continue to lower methane emissions. To avoid undermining American competitiveness, we urge the EPA to coordinate its efforts and not add duplicative rules.”

API is the national trade association representing all facets of the oil and natural gas industry, which supports 9.8 million U.S. jobs and 8 percent of the U.S. economy. API’s more than 625 members include large integrated companies, as well as exploration and production, refining, marketing, pipeline, and marine businesses, and service and supply firms. They provide most of the nation’s energy and are backed by a growing grassroots movement of more than 25 million Americans.