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Energy Tomorrow Blog

Fracking Ban Could Cripple U.S., New Study Finds

economic losses  jobs  us energy security  fracking 

Mark Green

Mark Green
Posted February 27, 2020

We’ve been making the point that political chatter about banning safe hydraulic fracturing and ending federal natural gas and oil leasing simply doesn’t make sense when you think about how far the U.S. has come in recent years – economic growth, increased energy security and consumer benefits – because of modern fracking, which is used for 95% of new wells in the U.S. today.

Thanks to a new study, we now know what that America would look like, and the picture isn’t good.

A new economic analysis conducted by OnLocation shows that if some politicians get their way and ban fracking and federal natural gas and oil leasing, the consequences could be crippling.

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Sommers: Fracking Helps Consumers, Environment

fracking  hydraulic fracturing  jobs  economic growth 

Mark Green

Mark Green
Posted February 25, 2020

Listen to API President and CEO Mike Sommers make the case for safe hydraulic fracturing – the chief reason the U.S. is the world’s leading natural gas and oil producer – during an interview with CNBC

Sommers makes the affirmative argument for fracking because some presidential candidates are talking about banning it – as well as federal natural gas and oil leasing. Sommers said millions of good-paying American jobs, U.S. security and significant environmental progress could be at risk if those advocating a ban on fracking get their way.

The CNBC appearance was among interviews Sommers gave while in New York City last week. In each of them Sommers underscored the vast benefits to the U.S. from modern fracking technology. 

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The Crippling Costs of a Fracking Ban

fracking  politics  us energy security  jobs  economic losses 

Mark Green

Mark Green
Posted February 21, 2020

API’s new video, “The Costs of a Fracking Ban,” pulls no punches: Ending the technology most responsible for the U.S. energy revolution – as proposed by some politicians – would harm millions of Americans and weaken the nation’s security. 

With 95% of new natural gas and oil wells developed with hydraulic fracturing, a ban on fracking most likely would end U.S. global leadership in natural gas and oil production and make America weaker, less secure. It would hamstring the economy and could cost millions of jobs. Average household costs could increase, and entire communities could be waylaid in the process.


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Pushing Back Against the 'American Recession Platform'

hydraullic fracturing  fracking  economic losses  oil and natural gas production 

Dean Foreman

Dean Foreman
Posted January 10, 2020

API’s new State of American Energy report illustrates how abundant U.S. natural gas and oil is empowering economic growth and opportunity across the country – and the potential harm to these benefits if fracking is banned, as some presidential candidates have promised to do.

The Washington Post’s Dino Grandoni has an analysis taking exception to the latter point, that banning hydraulic fracturing – the technology most responsible for launching the U.S. energy revolution – would seriously damage the U.S. economy, raise energy costs for American consumers and could likely trigger a recession at home and harm the global economy.

As an economist I would argue that an economic study isn’t needed to validate API’s point about a fracking ban. History shows what would happen if natural gas and oil production from the world’s leading producer was undercut by a fracking ban. According to independent studies, a sudden and enduring return to oil with triple-digit prices is the likely risk.

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Natural Gas is Integral to Climate Solutions in 2020 and Beyond

climate  emission reductions  natural gas  fracking 

John Siciliano

John D. Siciliano
Posted December 18, 2019

At the recent U.N. climate talks in Madrid, former Secretary of State John Kerry kicked off a new bipartisan climate campaign that includes natural gas as part of the answer in an interesting marriage between political campaign and real-world energy solutions. 

The campaign, referred to as World War Zero, will fan out to key battleground states next year to educate voters on climate change policies in the run-up to the November presidential election.

Kerry, a longtime senator and America’s top diplomat under the Obama administration, told the New York Times ahead of the Madrid talks that the campaign wouldn’t endorse one policy over another, and that members are free to support any number of climate solutions, including natural gas. 

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Here’s How to Devastate U.S. Energy and the World Economy: Ban Fracking

hydraulic fracturing  fracking  democrats  consumers  economic growth 

Mark Green

Mark Green
Posted November 14, 2019

Calls for a ban on hydraulic fracturing by some of the Democratic presidential candidates continue to make for discussion on the campaign trail – and boy, that is a discussion everyone should be paying attention to. The stakes are sky-high.

Recently, we highlighted this Michael Lynch analysis warning that a fracking ban could devastate the U.S. economy. Now the Manhattan Institute’s Mark P. Mills has a piece on Real Clear Energy asserting that in the most serious scenarios, banning U.S. fracking could put the global economy in recession – entirely plausible, given that the United States is the leading producer of natural gas and oil, the two energy sources that supply 54% of the globe’s fuel. In all, Mills notes in this report, fossil fuels supply 84% of the world’s energy.

Those are the stakes when candidates kick around the notion of banning hydraulic fracturing, which is used for 95% of new U.S. wells today. Ban fracking and you pull the rug out from under U.S. production – and with it, energy security, global energy leadership and, yes, environmental progress – considering increased U.S. use of natural gas has lowered energy-related carbon dioxide emissions to their lowest levels in a generation.

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Here’s How to Devastate U.S. Energy, Economy: Ban Fracking

hydraulic fracturing  fracking  economic impacts  natural gas 

Mark Green

Mark Green
Posted October 25, 2019

Energy analyst Michael Lynch has a couple of charts in his recent article for Forbes that do a good job of showing the stark repercussions of banning hydraulic fracturing – as a number of Democrats have advocated on the campaign trail.

First, understand that modern, technologically advanced fracking is used for 95% of new wells today. Shale and tight sandstone formations, which need hydraulic fracturing to be economically feasible, accounted for about 69% of total U.S. dry natural gas production in 2018 and 59% of total U.S. crude oil production, according to the U.S. Energy Information Administration. So, yes, a fracking ban or something approaching it would put a major dent in U.S. production.


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Poll: Maryland Plurality Supports Fracking

maryland  hydraulic fracturing  fracking  natural gas  jobs  economic growth 

Mark Green

Mark Green
Posted March 1, 2017

Maryland lawmakers pushing for a permanent state ban on hydraulic fracturing should touch base with their constituents first. A new Goucher College poll finds that among those who have an opinion on fracking, most don’t want the state to make the current fracking moratorium permanent. Goucher surveyed 776 people earlier this month and found 40 percent oppose banning hydraulic fracturing, with 36 percent supporting a ban.

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100 Days: Hydraulic Fracking Driving U.S. Energy Renaissance

100-days  fracking  hydraulic fracturing  energy 

Mark Green

Mark Green
Posted February 7, 2017

The link between hydraulic fracturing and U.S. global leadership in oil and natural gas production is direct: Without fracking, there’d be no American energy renaissance – or the array of benefits it is providing to our economy, to individual households, U.S. manufacturers and other businesses.

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On Fracking, EPA Should Stand With the Science

hydraulic fracturing  fracking  safety standards  epa  water 

Mark Green

Mark Green
Posted December 9, 2016

With EPA’s finalize report expected any day now, Americans should ask what scientific evidence has EPA accumulated since August that would compel the agency to drop or water down its conclusion. The answer is simple: None. The science and the data led to the conclusion in EPA’s 2015 draft report. The agency should stand by it. Any other outcome would be bowing to political arguments, not scientific ones.

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