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Energy Tomorrow Blog

API Opposes Government Intervention in Response to Market Downturn

crude markets  us energy security  opec  trade 

Sam Winstel

Sam Winstel
Posted March 25, 2020

There seems to be no shortage of flawed ideas in response to ongoing crude oil market instability.

Last week, a U.S. senator asked the Commerce Department to impose tariffs on imported crude oil, and a Texas state energy regulator called for statewide oil production quotas – isolating measures that don’t serve the interests of American consumers and don’t help our industry do its job of supplying the country with needed energy.

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For Good Reasons, Industry Doesn’t Want Tariffs or Quotas

oil and natural gas  trade  us energy security 

API CEO Mike Sommers

Mike Sommers
Posted March 23, 2020

As the world grapples with the ongoing spread of the coronavirus, the decision by Russia and the OPEC nations to increase energy supplies while demand is dropping has contributed to ongoing market instability and delivered a shock to America’s evolving energy picture.

Since the late 2000s, the U.S. has emerged as the world’s leading producer of natural gas and oil—last month producing at estimated record levels of 13 million barrels of oil and 96.5 billion cubic feet of natural gas to meet consumer demand. Innovative technologies like hydraulic fracturing have enabled producers to reach abundant U.S. shale reserves, and thus changed America’s trajectory from energy scarcity to abundance and from importing energy to exporting it. 

It is not surprising, then, that some global energy players are threatened by American energy leadership and have actively tried to prevent its progress. Russia and other nations’ push to increase global energy supply despite lower demand in the short term is a reaction to America’s new paradigm as a global energy superpower. This is a challenging situation, compounded by the impact of the coronavirus, but interventions like protectionist trade measures are not the answer.

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Energy Export Growth Hinges on Further Progress in U.S.-China Trade Talks

china  energy exports  trade 

Jessica  Lutz

Jessica Lutz
Posted January 23, 2020

The phase one trade deal between the U.S. and China is a step in the right direction for U.S. energy, increasing market stability and setting the stage for future negotiations. However, much more still needs to be done to restore U.S. energy export growth to China and repair damage brought on by the lengthy dispute – points made by API’s Aaron Padilla, senior advisor for international policy, in a Wall Street Journal interview earlier this week.


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Energy Gains in 2019 Set Stage for 2020

global markets  energy exports  production  trade 

Dean Foreman

Dean Foreman
Posted December 19, 2019

In this year-end edition of API’s Industry Outlook and Monthly Statistical Report (MSR) for December 2019, we make a toast to the natural gas and oil industry’s year of achievement and look forward to what appears to matter the most to U.S. energy consumers, producers and markets. 

Record U.S. natural gas and oil production, demand and exports – coupled with low prices – and regional economic growth have been supported by new resource and infrastructure developments.  Real domestic West Texas Intermediate (WTI) oil prices in 2019 have remained at about half of what they were 2011-2014, but with more than double the amount of home-grown oil production in 2019 compared with 2011. This has been an unabashed win for consumers, and it also has rejuvenated investments in resource development, processing, transportation, manufacturing and petrochemicals, as we discussed here.


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USMCA Advances America’s Energy Security

us trade  Energy Security  imports  exports 

Sam Winstel

Sam Winstel
Posted December 19, 2019

Last week, House Democrats and the Trump administration announced a bipartisan deal on the U.S.-Mexico-Canada Agreement (USMCA), concluding the year-long debate and setting the stage for congressional approval. Today, it heads to the House floor, bringing the agreement one step closer to reality.

From an energy perspective, the case for finalizing USMCA is strong, and as we’ve said, its approval is essential to economic progress and energy security. Because North America’s energy markets are interdependent and multi-directional, integration will result in more affordable energy for consumers in all three countries.

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As We Said – U.S. a Net Exporter of Total Energy

energy exports  trade  us energy security  economic benefits 

Dean Foreman

Dean Foreman
Posted December 12, 2019

In case you missed it, the U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) recently confirmed (see here and here) what API indicated in its Monthly Statistical Report (MSR) for September:  For the first time since the 1950s, the United States is now a net exporter of energy in total. 

Achieving this milestone is important for America. It embodies a slew of economic benefits, including lower energy prices – also those due to supply growth – rejuvenated investment in resource development, processing and transportation. It also has helped U.S. refining, petrochemicals and manufacturing, which have weathered the storm of U.S. trade restrictions and a strong U.S. dollar that made exporting U.S. goods more challenging.

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USMCA Approval Essential to Economic Progress, Energy Security

trade  economic growth  consumers  canada  mexico 

API CEO Mike Sommers

Mike Sommers
Posted October 23, 2019

Given bipartisan consensus on the importance of trade to America and our allies, finalization and approval of the U.S.-Mexico-Canada Agreement (USMCA) in Congress is long overdue. Because North American markets are highly interdependent, maintaining the tariff-free, intracontinental flow of natural gas, oil and refined products will help ensure that American families have continued access to affordable and reliable energy, and to our export markets in Canada and Mexico.

When it comes to the U.S. economy, the advantages of the USMCA are clear. Trade with Canada and Mexico supports 12 million American jobs across every state, according to the Business Roundtable, and totaled nearly $1.3 trillion in 2017. A U.S. International Trade Commission report estimates that approving USMCA could raise real GDP by $68.2 billion and create 176,000 jobs, relative to a baseline, six years after the trade deal enters into force.

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On U.S. Energy Security, Low Energy Prices

monthly-stats-report  exports  imports  trade 

Dean Foreman

Dean Foreman
Posted October 17, 2019

A major milestone for U.S. energy trade appears imminent. For the first time in more than 60 years, the U.S. may be a net exporter of total energy – based on API’s estimates in our latest Monthly Statistical Report (MSR).

The MSR shows that the U.S. petroleum trade balance decreased to net imports of just 818,000 barrels per day in September – and that at a time when domestic demand was at its highest level ever. With the U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) estimating that U.S. net exports of natural gas last month were 5.5 billion cubic feet per day (bcf/d) – more than 900,000 barrels per day in oil-equivalent energy – that would exceed U.S net imports of crude oil and refined products. 


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Additional Energy Tariffs Could Harm U.S., Consumers

trade  consumers  policy 

Mark Green

Mark Green
Posted September 10, 2019

Natural gas and oil, the bellwether of the U.S. economy, continue to be the collateral damage in the administration’s trade war with China – frustratingly ironic given the White House’s stated goal of bolstering American energy.

Important parts for offshore natural gas and oil drilling and production, as well as critical parts and accessories for energy projects are among products imported from China that will be subject to a 30% tariff as of Oct. 1 – an increase from the current 25% tariff.

Higher costs for these needed components could increase the cost of production and, ultimately, energy costs to U.S. consumers.

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Trade Tit-For-Tat Impacts U.S. Energy, Consumers

trade  china  energy exports 

Mark Green

Mark Green
Posted August 26, 2019

News item: China announces retaliatory tariffs on $75 billion worth of U.S. goods, including a first-ever tariffs on U.S. crude oil imports. In response, President Trump says previously announced tariffs on Chinese goods will go up. The U.S.-China trade war churns on and with it, there’s significant collateral damage.

We discussed the impacts before – the way trade restrictions threaten U.S. competitiveness and global energy leadership, the drag on the U.S. economy and how the administration’s tariffs hurt U.S. consumers, not China.  The latest trade tit-for-tat is similarly damaging. 

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